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ISi'HJ''SJtHrf^3'TiS<'5*')<(  irio  i  iril' Hili 


EALPH  BEAVER  STRASSBUHGER 


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Kalph  Beaver  Strassburger 


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The  Strassburger  Family 

AND 

ALLIED  FAMILIES 

OF  PENNSYLVANIA 


BEING  THE  ANCESTRY  OF 


Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger,  Esquire 


OF 


MONTGOMERY  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


BY  HIS  SON 

RALPH  BEAVER  STRASSBURGER 


GWYNEDD  VALLEY,  PA. 

Printed  for  Private  Circulation 

1922 


■y 


lASSBURULK. 


li  Evaris. 


Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger. 


This  Book 

is  dedicated  to  my  son 

JOHANN  ANDREAS  PETER  STRASSBURGER 

In  Memory  of  my  Father 

JACOB  ANDREW  STRASSBURGER 


The  glory  of  the  children  is  their  fathers     .      .     .     behold  our 
Heritage  from  them. 

—  William  Maxivell  E'varis. 


,t'i;^<u«3iio.;V?.  iSi^^*l  ?,«vd»nA  ttnartoV 


TABLE  OF  CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Foreword 17 

The  Palatinate 19 

The  Palatines 22 

The  Pennsylvania  Germans S3 

The  Strassburger  Family 47 

The  Yeager  Family 177 

The  Schneider  Family 197 

The  Stout  Family 199 

The  Hartzell  Family 233 

The  Kern  Family 257 

The  Schwenk  Family 281 

The  Bauer  Family 315 

The  Landis  Family 328 

The  Markley  Family 341 

The  Dotterer  Family 353 

The  Shoemaker  Family 375 

The  Kolb  Family 391 

The  Ziegler  Family 414 

The  Clemens  Family 456 

The  Lederach  Family 476 

Genealogical  Chart   493 


LIST  OF  ILLUSTRATIONS 

Owing  to  the  large  number  of  illustrations  used  in  this  work  it  has  been 
impossible  to  place  them  all  opposite  the  page  where  they  are  referred  to  in  the 
text;  but  as  the  illustrations  are  such  an  important  feature  in  a  reference  book 
of  this  character,  they  have  been  placed  as  nearly  consecutive  as  possible,  so 
that  the  subject  and  the  reference  might  be  preserved. 


PHOTOGRAVURES 

PAGE 

Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger 3 

Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger 5 

Normandy  Farm,  Gwynedd  Valley,  Pa 19 

Ober  Ingelheim,  Germany 33 

Ober  Ingelheim,  1640 47 

Strassburger  Homestead,  Ober  Ingelheim 53 

Catharine  Strassburger  Young  Hartzell 70 

Hannah  Strassburger  Berger 79 

Homestead  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  Lehigh  County,  Pa..  .  .     97 

Tohickon  Church  before  it  was  Remodeled 113 

The  Parsonage,  Sellersville,  Pa 119 

Residence  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger,  Perkasie,  Pa 125 

Reuben  Y.  Strassburger 150 

Elizabeth  Z.  Schwenk  Strassburger 152 


Residence  of  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger,  Hilltown,  Pa 157 

Residence  of  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger,  Schwenkville,  Pa..  .  .    158 

Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger 161 

Mary  J.  Beaver  Strassburger 167 

Mrs.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger 169 

Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger 175 

Entrance  to  Driveway,  Normandy  Farm 177 

The  Rose  Garden,  Normandy  Farm 197 

Elizabeth  Kern  Stout 257 

Graters  Ford,  Schwenkville,  Pa 298 

Jacob  Schwenk 305 

Kriesheim,  Germany   375 

The  Shoemaker  Graveyard '. 385 

The  Wissahickon  Creek  and  Mill,  Normandy  Farm 391 

Lower  Salford  Mennonite  Meeting  House 403 

The  Skippack  Mennonite  Meeting  House 415 

Residence  of  Michael  Ziegler  near  Skippackville,  Pa 429 

Site  of  Gerhart  Clemens'  Mill 454 

Residence  of  Jacob  Clemens 467 


LIST  OF  ILLUSTRATIONS 


HALFTONES 

PAGE 

Heidelburg  Castle   22 

Worms  Cathedral 22 

Rotterdam,  Holland 26 

Ursinus  College,  Montgomery  County,  Pa 37 

Treemount  Seminary,  Norristown,  Pa 37 

Market  Place,  Ober  Ingelheim 41 

Circular  Wall,  Ober  Ingelheim 43 

View  of  Normandy  Farm  Taken  from  Airplane 45 

Strassburg,  Alsace-Lorraine   48 

Protestant  Evangelical  Church,  Strassburg 48 

Old  Tower  and  Bridge,  Strassburg 48 

Old  Court  Yard,  Strassburg 48 

Ober  Ingelheim 51 

Ancient  Gateway,  Ober  Ingelheim 51 

Signature  of  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger,  1749 54 


Signatures  of  Passengers  of  the  Ship  Loyal  Judith,  1769 ....  54 

Signature  of  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger 55 

Protestant  Evangelical  Church,  Ober  Ingelheim 59 

Signature  of  John  Andrew  Strassburger 59 

Easton,  Pa.,  about  1840 62 

Bushkill  Street  Bridge,  Easton,  Pa 62 

Draft  of  Land  to  Andrew  Strassburger,  1793 64 

Chinaware  from  Parsonage  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger.  .  .  .66,  67 

Corner  Cupboard  from  Parsonage 74 

Copper  Tea  Kettle  from  Parsonage 74 

Pewter  Plate  from  the  Kern-Stout  Homestead 74 

Books  from  Library  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger 80 

Signature  of  John  Strassburger 84 

Signature  of  John  Engleman 84 

Title  Pages  from  Favorite  Books  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger.  .  86 

Book  Plates  from  Library  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger 93 

Doorway  to  Parsonage  at  Perkasie  and  some  of  its  Furnishings  103 

Tombstone  of  John  Andrew  Strassburger 110 

Tombstone  of  Eva  Yeager  Strassburger Ill 

Tombstone  of  Christina  Strassburger  Wieder Ill 


Certificate  of  Licensure  issued  to  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger .  ...  115 

Certificate  of  Ordination  issued  to  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger.  .  .  117 

Draft  of  Farm,  Perkasie,  Pa 117 

Later  Survey  of  Perkasie  Farm 122 

Family  Record  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger 123 

Resignation  of  Rev,  J.  A.  Strassburger 127 

Pages  from  Sermon  Books  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger 128,  129 

Deed,  Heirs  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger 132 

Mss.  Music  Book,  belonging  to  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger 136 

Pages  from  the  Music  Book 140,  141 

Tombstones  of  Infant  Children  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger.  .  145 

Tombstone  of  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger 146 

Tombstone  of  Catharine  Stout  Strassburger 146 

Marriage  Certificate  of  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  and  Elizabeth 

Z.  Schwenk 148 

Poem  of  Appreciation  by  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger 155 

Heidelburg  Reformed  Church,  Schwenkville,  Pa 162 

Family  Record  of  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger 165 

St.  John's  Church,  West  Wickham,  England 171 

Diploma  awarded  to  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger,  1899 180 


Appointment  of  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  to  Naval  Acad- 
emy, 1901   185 

Signature  of  John  Yeager 186 

Diploma  of  Graduation  to  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger,  1905 .    188 

Draft  of  Land  to  John  Yeager 192 

Stable  Drive,  Normandy  Farm 199 

Commission  as  Ensign,  given  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger, 

1907    201 

Tombstones  of  Jacob  Stout  and  Wife,  Mary  Lacey 205 

Carpenter's  Hall    207 

Germantown  Academy 207 

Certificate  of  Graduation  to  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  from 

Naval  Academy,  1907 212 

Signature  of  Abraham  Stout 215 

Commission  as  Ensign,  given  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  by 

President  Roosevelt,  1908 218 

Tombstone  of  Abraham  Stout 220 

Tombstone  of  Magdalena  Hartzell  Stout 220 

Tohickon  Church 227 

Survey  of  Kern-Stout  Farm,  1854 231 

Indian  Creek  Reformed  Church 233 


Exequator  granted  to  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  by  King 

Carol  I,  1912  236 

Survey  to  Henry  Hartzell,  1767   240 

Tombstone  of  Henry  Hartzell 241 

Signature  of  Henry  Hartzell 243 

Certificate  issued  to  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  by  Lord 

Bristol,  1912 244 

Commission  given  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  by  President 

Taft,  1912    246 

Exequator    granted    Ralph    Beaver    Strassburger    by    King 

Peter  I,  1912 251 

Reproduction  in  Slavic  of  Exequator  granted  by  King  Peter  1 .  253 

Interior  of  Tohickon  Church 260 

Stone  Stable  on  Kern-Stout  Farm 263 

Tombstone  of  Frederick  Kern 268 

Tombstone  of  Christian  Kern 268 

Deed,  Christian  Kern  to  John  Adam  Kern 271 

Deed,  John  Adam  Kern  to  Henry  H.  Stout 272 

Signature  of  Christian  Kern 274 

Organ  in  Tohickon  Church 277 

Tombstone  of  John  Adam  Kern 279 


Tombstone  of  Maria  Kem 279 

Bible  belonging  to  Catherine  Stout  Strassburger 281 

Residence  of  George  Schwenk,  Zieglerville,  Pa 285 

Signature  of  George  Schwenk 285 

Schwenk  Family  Burial  Ground 287 

Residence  of  George  Schwenk  near  Zieglerville,  Pa 290 

Comrnission  from  President  Taft  to  Ralph  Beaver  Strass- 
burger, 1913 292 

Signature  of  Abraham  Schwenk 294 

Signature  of  Jacob  Schwenk 294 

Diplomatic  Passport  issued  to  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger, 

1913    294 

Residence  of  Abraham  Schwenk 296 

Signature  of  Abraham  Schwenk ' 302 

Tombstone  of  Abraham  Schwenk 303 

Tombstone  of  Fronica  Bauer  Schwenk 303 

Schwenkville,  Pa 309 

Signature  of  Jacob  Schwenk 309 

Tombstone  of  Jacob  Schwenk 311 

Tombstone  of  Magdalena  Ziegler  Schwenk 311 


Barns  at  Normandy  Farm 315 

Certificate  issued  to  Lieut.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger,  1919 .  .  320 

Official   Commendation  to   Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger   for 

Services  in  World  War,  1919 324 

Survey  of  Land  to  Heirs  of  Hans  Bower 326 

Passport  issued  to  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  and  Family, 

1920    328 

Signature  of  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  to  Passport 332 

Signature  of  John  Landis 334 

Official  Visas  covering  Continental  Tour,  1920-21 336 

Official  Visas,  1920-21 338 

Residence  of  Major  Jacob  Markley 341 

Official  Visas,  1920-21 344 

Old  Trappe  Church 347 

Interior  of  Old  Trappe  Church 347 

Rev.  Peter  Muhlenberg 347 

Old  Mill,  Normandy  Farm 353 

Survey  of  Land  to  George  Philip  Dotterer 361 

Stable  Court  and  Training  Ring,  Normandy  Farm 364 

Mennonite  Meeting  House,  Germantown,  Pa 376 

Early  Pennsylvania  Habitation 381 

Germantown  Seal 382 


Signature  of  Peter  Shoemaker   389 

Manheim,  Germany 394 

Stable  and  Grounds,  Normandy  Farm 409 

Signature  of  Dielman  Kolb 412 

Deed,  David  Powell  to  Michael  Ziegler,  1717-18 419 

Survey  of  Land  to  Michael  Ziegler,  1734 423 

Deed,  Andrew  Shrager  to  Michael  Ziegler,  1727 424 

Signatures  of  Michael  and  Catherine  Ziegler 428 

Signature  of  Michael  Ziegler 431 

Residence  of  Andrew  Ziegler,  Zieglerville,  Pa 433 

Doorway  to  Residence  of  Andrew  Ziegler 433 

Chair  belonging  to  Ziegler  Family 433 

Signature  of  Andrew  Ziegler,  Sr 439 

Old  Farm  House,  Normandy  Farm 442 

Ziegler's  Mill,  Zieglerville,  Pa 446 

Tombstone  of  Andrew  Ziegler,  Jr 448 

Tombstone  of  Catharine  Lederach  Ziegler 448 

Signature  of  Andrew  Ziegler,  Jr 451 

Zieglerville,  Pa 452 

The  Goshenhoppen  Valley 452 

Signature  of  Matthias  Van  Bebber 456 


Signature  of  Thomas  Fairman 456 

Signature  of  Francis  Daniel  Pastorius 456 

Deed,  Matthias  Van  Bebber  to  Gerhart  Clemens,  1711 457 

Deed,  Gerhart  Clemens  to  Michael  Ziegler,  1722 459 

Survey  of  Land  to  Gerhart  Clemens,  1735 462 

Patent  to  Gerhart  Clemens,  1735 463 

Deed,  Gerhart  Clemens  to  Jacob  Clemens,  1738 464 

Signature  of  Jacob  Clemens 473 

Schoolhouse  on  Normandy  Farm,  built  1858 474 

Residence  of  Andrew  Lederach 477 

Survey  to  Andrew  Lederach 477 

Lederachville,  Pa 480 

Signature  of  Henry  Lederach 486 

Signature  of  Joseph  Tyson 489 

Signature  of  Henry  Lederach,  Jr 489 

Signature  of  Jacob  Clemens 489 

Signature  of  Andrew  Ziegler 489 

Signature  of  Abraham  Shott 489 

Signature  of  Henry  Price 489 

Lederach  Family  Burial  Ground 490 

Genealogical  Chart 493 


FOREWORD 

THERE  is  no  more  attractive  line  of  study  than  that  which 
aims  at  revealing  the  life  and  surroundings,  the  struggles 
and  trials,  the  manners  and  customs,  the  thoughts  and  feel- 
ings of  our  forefathers.  It  is  the  purpose  of  this  book  to  lift  the 
veil  of  the  past  and  to  bring  to  the  present  descendants  an  appre- 
ciation and  realization  of  the  splendid  character  and  enduring 
faith  of  these  worthy  pioneers.  In  the  following  pages  an  effort 
has  been  made  to  present  to  the  reader  a  picture  of  the  individual 
and  a  vision  of  his  home  and  daily  life,  on  the  farm,  in  the  church, 
at  school,  in  his  intercourse  with  his  neighbor,  and  his  services  to 
the  state  and  country.  In  a  work  of  this  magnitude,  it  would  be 
impossible  to  avoid  making  some  errors,  but  a  particular  effort 
has  been  made  to  set  forth  as  correct  and  exact  a  history  of  these 
early  pioneers  and  their  descendants  as  could  be  gleaned  from 
historical  and  genealogical  sources  available  at  the  present  day. 
Except  in  a  few  instances  where  so  designated  as  tradition,  the 
information  and  facts  as  set  down  have  been  collected  from  au- 
thentic sources. 

Farms,  churches,  and  burial  grounds  have  been  visited ;  church 
books  and  tombstones  carefully  scanned;  original  wills  and  deeds, 
both  recorded  and  unrecorded,  have  been  copied;  and  manuscripts 
and  printed  data  of  all  kinds  examined.  And  while  a  very  great 
deal  that  is  both  interesting  and  valuable  has  been  obtained,  very, 
very  much  has  been  lost  for  all  time  through  the  death  of  the  older 
generations  who  had  been  the  link  between  the  past  and  the  present. 
The  historical  data  used  in  both  the  introduction  and  the  main 
part  of  the  book  has  been  compiled  from  the  writings  of  Julius  F. 
Sachse,  Dr.  Oswald  Seidensticker,  Henry  Melchior  Muhlenberg 
Richards,  Dr.  Kuhn,  Samuel  W.Pennyp acker,  and  other  eminent 
writers  and  historians. 


18  THE    STRASSBURGER    GENEALOGY 

I  take  this  opportunity  to  extend  my  thanks  and  sincere  ap- 
preciation to  all  those  who  have  so  cordially  given  their  assistance, 
by  contributing  valuable  information  and  permitting  treasured 
documents  to  be  copied.  Especial  thanks  are  due  Mrs.  W.  L. 
Stauffer  (Margaret  Strassburger),  of  Norristown;  Miss  Annie  C. 
Strassburger,  of  Allentown,  and  Mrs.  Rebecca  Strassburger  Dot- 
terer,  of  Philadelphia,  who,  through  their  interest  and  appreciation 
of  the  value  of  family  history,  many  years  ago  gleaned  and  pre- 
served much  of  the  data  which  has  been  used  in  this  volume ;  also 
to  the  late  Andrew  Strassburger  Hartzell  and  wife,  of  Perkasie; 
John  Lederach,  of  Lederachville;  the  late  Enos  Schwenk;  Albert 
Schwenk,  of  Schwenkville,  and  others,  for  the  loan  of  their  private 
papers. 

I  wish  to  acknowledge  the  gratitude  felt  towards  my  mother, 
Mary  Jane  Beaver  Strassburger,  who  early  in  my  youth  instilled  the 
fundamental  thought  of  reverence  and  love  for  my  family,  which 
has  furnished  a  constant  incentive  for  the  carrying  out  of  this  work, 
and  which  I  know  would  have  given  her  great  pleasure,  as  well  to 
my  father,  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger,  who,  during  his  life,  had 
taken  great  interest  in  historical  and  genealogical  matters. 

I  cannot  give  too  much  praise  and  commendation  to  Miss 
Mame  E.  Wood  for  her  collaboration  in  the  preparation  of  this 
book.  She  has  been  tireless  in  her  efforts,  and  her  work  as  a 
trained  genealogist  in  connection  with  the  research,  merits  the  high- 
est approbation,  and  I  wish  to  extend  not  only  my  thanks,  but 
full  credit  for  her  valuable  assistance. 


Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger. 


Normandy  Farm,   Gwynedd  Valley, 

Montgomery  Co.,   Pennsylvania. 

March,  1922. 


■^m 


TlJi:.   PALATIN-'^K 


;  i;j  a  aame  given  to  a  dis- 

T; .,  V    ..{r^^  lying  west  of  the 

;■    Prussian  Rhine 

'^n.  on  the  west 

ni  the  south 

V. 

-[  . ,  ih  Ui'i)  V  fa 

>:.  >.p.  the  tinxe 

-e  giOh-  :;  roRceraed 

mn  of  thej'nances  of  imperial  lands  or  who 

s<-:  vied  the  iscf?]  duries.     Some  of  these  of&cials, 

mstead  ol  remaianig  iiecir  ih^')t^r;-,oii  of  the  King,  were  sent  to 

'•ari'  empire  teg  act  as  judges  and  governors,  the 

'r  " '  ■'  '   liheing  called  palatinates,     Bcv:>q 

;.     .,  ..^.iiv'cs  of  th*^  '^'^vr reign,  they  were 

.  ore  exttiided  gower  than  iry  counts,  and 

tne  the  more  geneMj  u';e  of  the  word  "Palatine,'  as 

;).«  entrusted  \v]|l)  sjiecial  powers,  j^ad  also  to  dis- 

these  powers  v#fe  exercised.    The  German  counts 

IS,  soon  became  iv  '     nr. 

-"'  of  the  Rhine,  v.  .  -  ,  ,   ;iirie 

-'I  tp-^  r:"':r;ire, 

i?mi,  945-996, 

which  year 

er,  Conrad 

:lo  was  one  of 

'.'.'..  ^.i :../:  ;  -  \s  residence  at 

'■  '--^ibuhel,  near  lie..  ..    ...,.   capital  of  the 

nate.    In  12  J  4,  th  ''en  by  Frederick  .TI  -.o 


ft; 


§1 


THE  PALATINATE 

THE  Palatinate  (German  Pfalz)  is  a  name  given  to  a  dis- 
trict of  Germany,  a  province  of  Bavaria,  lying  west  of  the 
Rhine.  It  is  bounded  on  the  north  by  the  Prussian  Rhine 
Province  and  the  Hessian  Province  of  Rhen  Hessen,  on  the  west 
by  Baden,  from  which  it  is  separated  by  the  Rhine,  on  the  south 
by  Alsace-Lorraine,  and  on  the  west  by  Trier  and  Coblenz,  which 
belong  to  the  Prussian  Rhine  Province. 

The  word  "paladin,"  of  which  palatine  is  a  variant,  is  derived 
from  the  Latin  palatium,  palace,  and  was  first  used  in  the  time 
of  Charlemagne  to  designate  those  officials  who  were  concerned 
with  the  administration  of  the  finances  of  imperial  lands  or  who 
assisted  the  King  in  his  judicial  duties.  Some  of  these  officials, 
instead  of  remaining  near  the  person  of  the  King,  were  sent  to 
various  parts  of  the  empire  to  act  as  judges  and  governors,  the 
districts  over  which  they  ruled  being  called  palatinates.  Being 
in  a  special  sense  the  representatives  of  the  Sovereign,  they  were 
entrusted  with  more  extended  power  than  hereditary  counts,  and 
thus  later  came  the  more  general  use  of  the  word  "Palatine,"  as 
applied  to  persons  entrusted  with  special  powers,  and  also  to  dis- 
tricts over  which  these  powers  were  exercised.  The  German  counts 
palatine,  with  one  or  two  exceptions,  soon  became  insignificant. 
One  exception  was  the  Count  Palatine  of  the  Rhine,  who  became 
one  of  the  most  important  lay  officials  of  the  empire. 

The  first  Count  Palatine  of  the  Rhine  was  Hermann,  945-996, 
and  held  hereditary  until  Count  Hermann  III,  1115,  in  which  year 
the  German  King,  Frederick  I,  appointed  his  step-brother,  Conrad 
von  Hohenstauffen,  as  Count  Palatine.  Conrad,  who  was  one  of 
the  most  enlightened  rulers  of  his  day,  took  up  his  residence  at 
Juttenbuhel,  near  Heidelberg,  which  became  the  capital  of  the 
Palatinate.    In  1214,  this  Palatinate  was  given  by  Frederick  II  to 


20  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Otto,  infant  son  of  Louis  I,  King  of  Bavaria,  who  died  in  1253, 
and  his  possessions  being  divided,  the  elder  son,  Louis  II,  received 
the  Palatinate  and  Upper  Bavaria.  At  a  later  date  Upper  Bavaria 
was  called  Upper  Palatinate  to  distinguish  it  from  the  Rhenish 
or  Lower  Palatinate.  Elector  Frederick  III  succeeded  in  1459. 
He  was  a  keen,  though  not  very  bigoted,  Calvinist;  was  one  of 
the  most  active  Protestant  princes,  and  was  followed,  1583,  by 
his  son,  Louis  VI,  who  was  a  Lutheran,  and  he  in  turn,  1583-92, 
by  Frederick  IV  (Frederick  the  Wise),  who  gave  every  encourage- 
ment to  the  Calvinists.  He  was  founder  and  head  of  the  Evan- 
gelical Union  establishment  to  combat  the  aggressive  tendencies 
of  the  Roman  Catholics.  His  son.  Elector  Frederick  V,  accepted 
the  throne  of  Bohemia  and  this  brought  on  the  Thirty  Years'  War. 
He  was  quickly  driven  from  the  country  and  his  electorate  was 
devastated  by  Bavarians  and  Spaniards.  At  the  Peace  of  West- 
phalia, 1648,  the  Palatinate  was  restored  to  Frederick's  son, 
Charles  Louis,  but  was  shorn  of  Upper  Palatinate,  which  Bavaria 
retained  as  a  prize  of  war. 

Scarcely  had  the  Palatinate  begun  to  recover  from  the  effect 
of  the  war  when  it  was  attacked  by  Louis  XIV,  King  of  France, 
and  for  six  years,  from  1673  to  1679,  the  electorate  was  devastated 
by  French  troops,  and,  even  after  the  Treaty  of  Nizmnegen,  it 
suffered  from  the  aggressive  policy  of  Louis.  Charles  Louis, 
Count  Palatine,  died  in  1680,  and  his  son  and  successor,  five  years 
after,  and  Philip  William,  of  another  branch,  became  Elector 
Palatine,  1685.  The  French  King's  brother,  Philip,  Duke  of 
Orleans,  had  married  Charlotte  Elizabeth,  sister  of  the  late  Elector 
Charles,  whereupon  the  King,  in  1680,  had  claimed,  in  right  of  his 
brother's  marriage,  a  part  of  Charles'  land.  His  troops  took 
Heidelberg  while  Philip  William  took  refuge  in  Vienna,  where  he 
died,  1690.  By  the  Treaty  of  Rhyswick,  King  Louis  abandoned 
his  claim  to  the  Palatinate  for  a  sum  of  money. 

Just  before  this  the  Palatinate  began  to  be  troubled  by  re- 
ligious contentions.     The  great  mass   of  the   inhabitants  w^ere 


THE  PALATINATE  21 

Protestant,  while  the  family  which  succeeded  in  1685  belonged 
to  the  Catholic  Church.  Philip  William,  however,  gave  equal 
rights  to  all  his  subjects,  but  under  his  son  and  successor,  the 
Elector  John  William,  the  Protestants  were  deprived  of  various 
civil  rights  until  the  intervention  of  Prussia  and  Brunswick  in 
1705,  which  gave  them  some  redress.  The  next  elector  was  Charles 
Philip,  who  moved  the  capital  from  Heidelberg  to  Manheim,  1720. 
He  died,  1742,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  kinsman,  Charles  Theo- 
dore, a  prince  of  refined  and  educated  tastes,  and  under  his  long 
rule  his  country  enjoyed  prosperity.  He  died,  1799,  without  sons, 
and  his  successor  was  Maximilian  Joseph,  who  later  became  King 
of  Bavaria  as  Maximilian  I.  Since  1818,  the  Palatinate  has 
formed  a  part  of  Bavaria. 


rr-^ 


THE  PALATINES 


HOSE  Americans  of  German  ancestry  who  wish  to  learn 

.         something  of  the  European  history  of  their  ancestors  who 

-*^       came  to  this  country  in  the  latter  part  of  the  seventeenth 

and  the  first  half  of  the  eighteenth  century  and  the  cause  of  their 

emigration,  must  go  back  to  the  period  of  the  Reformation  and  the 

results  following  that  great  movement. 

The  German  emigrants  who  came  to  Pennsylvania  between 
the  years  1683  and  1776  were  almost  entirely  from  South  Ger- 
many, especially  the  Palatinate,  Wurtemberg,  and  from  Switzer- 
land. 

The  Palatinate  has  a  history  that  is  not  only  interesting  but 
most  important.  Its  inhabitants  are  descendants  of  the  group  of 
German  tribes  called  the  Rhein  Franken,  with  an  admixture  of 
the  Alemanni,  the  latter  of  whom  had  occupied  the  land  until 
496  A.  D.,  when  Chlodowig,  King  of  the  Franks,  defeated  them 
in  a  battle  fought  somewhere  on  the  Upper  Rhine.  Situated  along 
the  great  water  highway  of  Europe,  they  are  said  "to  combine  the 
best  qualities  of  the  North  and  South,  being  distinguished  for 
indomitable  industry,  keen  wit,  independence  and  to  possess  a  high 
degree  of  intelligence."  During  the  Middle  Ages  the  Palatinate 
had  been  among  the  most  powerful  and  influential  of  the  German 
states,  having  benefited  and  advanced  under  such  progressive 
rulers  as  Conrad  von  Hohenstauffen,  Frederick  the  Wise,  who 
recognized  the  Reformation,  and  the  tolerant  and  broad-minded 
Karl  Ludwig,  the  protector  of  the  Swiss  Mennonites.  The  country 
along  the  Rhine  and  Neckar  was  known  as  the  garden  of  Ger- 
many, and  the  University  of  Heidelberg  was  one  of  the  oldest  and 
most  influential  seats  of  learning  in  Europe.  The  yeomanry  were 
in  a  state  of  great  prosperity.  "Their  houses  were  comfortable, 
their  barns  capacious,  their  stables  well  stocked  with  horses  and 
cattle,  their  crops  were  plenteous,  and  many  had  considerable  sums 
of  money  safely  stored  away  against  a  rainy  day,  and  some  even 
boasted  of  silver  plate." 


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THE  PALATINES  23 

The  terrible  disorders  of  religious  wars  dealt  a  deadly  blow 
at  this  prosperity.  The  Thirty  Years'  War  (1618-1648)  was 
one  of  the  most  destructive  in  history.  It  was  the  Elector  Palatine, 
Frederick  V,  himself  who,  by  accepting  the  crown  of  Bohemia, 
precipitated  this  war  and  attracted  to  his  country  the  full  fury  of 
combat.  Cities,  towns,  and  villages  were  devastated  in  turn  by  the 
armies  of  friends  as  well  as  of  foes,  and  poverty,  hardships,  murder 
and  rapine  followed  in  the  wake  of  the  strange  invaders,  till  the 
whole  intellectual,  moral  and  religious  character  of  the  people 
received  a  shock  that  almost  threatened  the  country  with  anni- 
hilation. The  sufferings  of  the  country  folk,  during  these  long 
years  of  warfare,  were  pitiable  indeed.  "Not  only  were  horses  and 
cattle  carried  away  by  the  various  armies  which  shifted  back  and 
forth  over  the  length  and  breadth  of  the  land,  not  only  were 
houses,  barns,  and  even  crops  burned,  but  the  master  of  the  house 
was  frequently  subjected  to  fiendish  torture  in  order  that  he  might 
thus  be  forced  to  discover  the  hiding  place  of  his  gold ;  or,  as  often 
happened,  as  a  punishment  for  having  nothing  to  give.  At  the 
approach  of  a  hostile  army  the  whole  village  would  take  to  flight, 
and  would  live  for  weeks  in  the  midst  of  forests  and  marshes,  or 
in  caves.  The  enemy  having  departed,  the  wretched  survivors 
would  return  to  their  ruined  homes  and  carry  on  a  painful  exist- 
ence with  the  few  remains  of  their  former  property,  until  they 
were  forced  to  fly  again  by  new  invasions.  Many  were  slain, 
many  of  the  young  were  lured  away  to  swell  the  ranks  of  the 
armies,  many  fled  to  the  cities  for  safety  and  never  returned  to 
their  native  villages.  The  country  which  had  shortly  before  been 
so  prosperous  was  now  a  wilderness  of  uncultivated  land,  marked 
here  and  there  by  the  blackened  ruins  which  designated  the  site 
of  former  farms  and  villages." 

The  Thirty  Years'  War  came  to  an  end  in  1648,  and  a  period 
of  comparative  peace  followed,  but  it  was  of  short  duration.  It 
was  in  1685,  while  Philip  William  was  Elector  Count  Palatine, 
that  Louis  XIV  made  the  utterly  unjust  and  unrighteous  claim 
to  a  portion  of  the  Palatinate  in  the  name  of  the  daughter  of  the 
late  Elector,  Elizabeth,  who  had  married  the  Duke  of  Orleans, 
the  dissolute  brother  of  the  French  King,  and  this  despite  the  fact 
that  Elizabeth  had  no  legal  right  to  the  land  and  did  not  herself 
claim  it.    This  move  on  the  part  of  the  French  King  was  opposed 


24  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

by  all  the  princes  of  Northern  Europe,  who  leagued  themselves 
against  him,  England,  Holland  and  Germany  standing  as  a  solid 
mass  against  this  intrigue  of  France.  Louis,  finding  himself  un- 
able to  cope  single-handed  against  this  mighty  combination,  de- 
termined that  "if  the  soil  of  the  Palatinate  was  not  to  furnish 
supplies  to  the  French,  it  should  be  so  wasted  that  it  would  at 
least  furnish  no  supplies  to  the  Germans,"  and  he  therefore  ap- 
proved the  famous  order  of  his  War  Minister  Louvois  to  "briiler 
le  Palatinat."  The  scenes  that  followed  far  surpassed  the  horrors 
of  the  Thirty  Years'  War.  Macaulay,  describing  the  sufferings 
and  trials  of  these  people,  writes:  "The  commander  announced 
to  near  half  a  million  human  beings  that  he  granted  them  three 
days  of  grace,  and  that  within  that  time  they  must  shift  for  them- 
selves. Soon  the  roads  and  fields,  which  then  lay  deep  in  snow, 
were  blackened  by  innumerable  multitudes  of  men,  women,  and 
children  flying  from  their  homes.  .  .  .  Meanwhile  the  work  of 
destruction  went  on.  The  flames  went  up  from  every  market  place, 
every  parish  church,  every  country-seat,  within  the  devoted  prov- 
ince. The  fields  where  the  corn  had  been  sowed  were  ploughed 
up.  The  orchards  were  hewn  down.  No  promise  of  a  harvest  was 
left  on  the  fertile  plains  near  what  had  been  Frankenthal.  Not  a 
vine,  nor  an  almond  tree  was  to  be  seen  on  the  slopes  of  the  sunny 
hills  round  what  had  once  been  Heidelberg." 

It  was  the  desire  of  Louis  not  only  to  seize  the  country,  but 
to  crush  out  heresy  there ;  and  he  entered  upon  a  system  of  oppres- 
sion and  intolerance  that  almost  caused  the  death  of  Protestantism 
in  the  Palatinate. 

The  war  ended,  the  Treaty  of  Rhys  wick  was  signed  in  1697, 
and  John  William,  son  of  Elector  Philip  William,  came  back  to 
his  dominion,  but  his  coming  only  brought  new  trouble  to  his 
already  crushed  and  helpless  people.  Before  the  invasion  of  their 
land  by  the  Catholic  King  Louis,  the  Province  had  enjoyed  re- 
ligious freedom.  After  the  Lutheran,  Otto  Heinrich,  the  land  had 
had  a  succession  of  Calvinist  rulers  until  the  accession  of  Philip 
William,  1685,  who  died  two  years  later;  his  son,  John  William, 
who  succeeded,  had  been  educated  by  the  Jesuits,  and  under  his 
rule  Protestantism  in  the  Palatinate  almost  received  its  death  blow. 
This  Elector,  with  a  show  of  tolerance,  issued  a  decree  that  all 
churches  should  be  open  to  all  three  faiths:  Reformed,  Lutheran, 


THE  PALATINES  25 

and  Catholic.  But  while  the  Protestants  were  obliged  to  give  up 
a  great  number  of  their  church  buildings,  the  Catholics  remained 
in  undisturbed  possession  of  their  own.  The  Protestants  were  re- 
quired to  bend  the  knee  at  the  passing  of  the  Host  and  to  furnish 
flowers  for  the  church  festivals,  while  the  work  of  proselyting  was 
carried  on  publicly  by  the  Jesuits.  The  Swiss  Mennonites,  the 
Walloons,  and  the  Huguenots,  who  for  many  years  had  found  a 
refuge  in  the  Palatinate,  were  now  driven  from  the  land,  and  many 
found  refuge  in  Holland  and  elsewhere. 

Not  only  did  these  intolerable  religious  conditions  prevail, 
but  the  corruption  and  tyranny,  extravagance  and  heartlessness  of 
the  rulers  of  the  Palatinate  were  an  additional  affront  to  an  already 
overburdened  and  sorely  tried  people.  While  the  country  was 
exhausted  and  on  the  verge  of  ruin,  costly  palaces  were  built,  enor- 
mous retinues  maintained;  and  while  pastors  and  teachers  were 
starving,  hundreds  of  Court  officers  lived  in  luxury  and  idleness. 
The  chasm  between  the  upper  classes  and  the  peasant  became  more 
and  more  widened,  one  hardship  after  another  was  placed  upon 
the  latter,  and  he  was  totally  without  means  of  redress.  This  state 
of  affairs  existed  not  only  in  the  Palatinate,  but  in  Wurtemberg 
and  other  petty  principalities  nearby. 

But  the  night  of  oppression  and  wrong  was  nearing  its  zenith, 
the  light  of  a  new  and  better  day  was  breaking.  Columbus,  by 
his  fateful  voyage,  had  changed  the  fate  and  fortunes  of  two  con- 
tinents. The  era  of  great  maritime  adventure  followed.  Western 
Europe,  from  the  Iberian  to  the  Scandinavian  peninsula,  embark- 
ing upon  a  career  of  colonial  enterprise,  England,  Spain,  Sweden 
and  France  at  once  entered  upon  the  work  of  seizure  and  division. 
Colonists  were  needed  to  found  colonies.  Every  available  agency 
was  employed  to  make  the  new  lands  profitable  to  their  new  owners. 
The  most  attractive  inducements  were  brought  into  play  to  set  the 
spirit  of  emigration  in  motion,  and  "wonder  tales"  were  held  up 
before  the  harassed,  war-torn  millions  of  the  old  world  by  land 
companies  and  schemers,  whose  interest  lay  only  in  the  numbers 
they  could  induce  to  cross  the  Atlantic.  Scores  of  small  pamphlets 
were  written,  printed  and  scattered  throughout  almost  every  country 
in  Europe. 


26  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

To  William  Penn,  and  especially  to  his  trusted  agent,  Ben- 
jamin Furley,  must  be  given  the  credit  of  diverting  by  far  the 
largest  part  of  the  German  emigration  to  America  to  his  own 
Province.  To  a  people  ready  to  sacrifice  and  suffer  all  for  con- 
science sake,  the  persecution  by  creed  was  as  intolerable  as  that 
which  despoiled  them  of  their  homes  and  substance. 

There  came  to  these  people  in  1671,  and  again  in  1677,  a 
young  man  of  humble  yet  stately  mien,  who  preached  the  doctrine 
of  good-will  to  men.  It  was  William  Penn,  the  Quaker,  whose 
religious  tenets,  they  found,  differed  so  little  from  those  held  by 
the  followers  of  Menno  Simon.  He  cared  little  to  what  nationality 
his  people  belonged,  provided  they  were  otherwise  desirable.  The 
news  that  he  had  offered  them  a  home  in  his  Province,  where  they 
could  live  without  w^ars  and  persecutions,  and  under  laws  which 
they  should  share  in  making,  brought  cheer  and  hope  to  many  a 
peasant  household. 

As  early  as  March  10,  1682,  Penn  had  sold,  through  his  agent, 
several  5000-acre  tracts  to  merchants  of  Crefeld,  Germany.  In 
1683,  Francis  Daniel  Pastorius,  as  agent  for  a  number  of  German 
friends,  bought  25,000  acres,  and  upon  these  the  town  of  Ger- 
mantown  was  soon  after  located.  This  was  the  beginning  of  that 
mighty  Teutonic  wave  of  immigration  which,  commencing  with 
Pastorius  and  his  little  colony  of  Crefelders  of  less  than  two  score 
members,  continued  to  come  in  an  ever-increasing  volume  until  it 
outgrew  and,  in  a  measure,  displaced  some  of  the  other  nationalities 
which  preceded  it. 

The  principal  port  of  embarkation  was  Rotterdam,  hence  to 
Cowes,  in  the  Isle  of  Wight.  There  were  about  seventy  different 
kinds  of  ships  which  sailed  back  and  forth  from  continent  to  con- 
tinent. Some  of  these  craft  were  called  vessels,  others  ranked  as 
ships,  while  there  were  still  others  known  as  snows,  brigantines, 
pinks,  brigs,  etc.,  names,  apparently  applied  to  small  craft,  no 
longer  current  among  shipbuilders  and  seafaring  men.  The  late 
winter  and  autumn  months  were  generally  chosen  for  the  departure 
from  Europe.  We  accordingly  find  the  ship  arrivals  were  most 
numerous  during  the  months  of  April,  May,  September,  October, 
and  November. 


26  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

To  William  Penn,  and  especially  to  his  trusted  agent,  Ben- 
jamin Furley,  must  be  given  the  credit  of  diverting  by  far  the 
largest  part  of  the  German  emigration  to  America  to  his  own 
Province.  To  a  people  ready  to  sacrifice  and  suffer  all  for  con- 
science sake,  the  persecution  by  creed  was  as  intolerable  as  that 
which  despoiled  them  of  their  homes  and  substance. 

There  came  to  these  people  in  1671,  and  again  in  1677,  a 
young  man  of  humble  yet  stately  mien,  who  preached  the  doctrine 
of  good-will  to  men.  It  was  William  Penn,  the  Quaker,  whose 
religious  tenets,  they  found,  differed  so  little  from  those  held  by 
the  followers  of  Menno  Simon.  He  cared  little  to  what  nationality 
his  people  belonged,  provided  they  were  otherwise  desirable.  The 
news  that  he  had  offered  them  a  home  in  his  Province,  where  they 
could  live  without  wars  and  persecutions,  and  under  laws  which 
they  should  share  in  making,  brought  cheer  and  hope  to  many  a 
peasant  household. 

As  early  as  March  10,  1682,  Penn  had  sold,  through  his  agent, 
several  5000-acre  tracts  to  merchants  of  Crefeld,  Germany.  In 
1683,  Francis  Daniel  Pastorius,  as  agent  for  a  number  of  German 
friends,  bought  25,000  acres,  and  upon  these  the  town  of  Ger- 
mantown  was  soon  after  located.  This  was  the  beginning  of  that 
mighty  Teutonic  wave  of  immigration  which,  commencing  with 
Pastorius  and  his  little  colony  of  Crefelders  of  less  than  two  score 
members,  continued  to  come  in  an  ever-increasing  volume  until  it 
outgrew  and,  in  a  measure,  displaced  some  of  the  other  nationalities 
which  preceded  it. 

The  principal  port  of  embarkation  was  Rotterdam,  hence  to 
Cowes,  in  the  Isle  of  Wight.  There  were  about  seventy  different 
kinds  of  ships  which  sailed  back  and  forth  from  continent  to  con- 
tinent. Some  of  these  craft  were  called  vessels,  others  ranked  as 
ships,  while  there  were  still  others  known  as  snows,  brigantines, 
pinks,  brigs,  etc.,  names,  apparently  applied  to  small  craft,  no 
longer  current  among  shipbuilders  and  seafaring  men.  The  late 
winter  and  autumn  months  were  generally  chosen  for  the  departure 
from  Europe.  We  accordingly  find  the  ship  arrivals  were  most 
numerous  during  the  months  of  April,  May,  September,  October, 
and  November. 


UoUerdani  in   \7A2.  Ir..ii 


Anil.vas  Slrassl.iuyiT  mailed  f..r  1 'hiladclpliia. 


THE  PALATINES  27 

While  many  of  the  early  German  emigrants  had,  at  one  time, 
been  well-to-do,  the  devastations  of  the  Thirty  Years'  War  and 
the  wanton  destruction  ordered  by  Louis  XIV  had  reduced  to 
poverty  thousands  who  had  been  prosperous  farmers  and  trades- 
men. Whatever  property  they  had  been  able  to  gather  together 
was  used  up  in  their  expenses  of  descending  the  Rhine  and  crossing 
the  ocean,  or  was  stolen  on  the  way.  The  vessels,  as  a  rule,  were 
so  overcrowded  with  passengers  and  merchant  goods  that  fre- 
quently the  captain  made  it  a  point  to  leave  behind  the  chests 
and  personal  goods  of  the  emigrant,  or  else  have  them  loaded  on 
vessels  bound  for  another  port.  This  was  one  of  the  greatest  hard- 
ships these  migrating  people  had  to  endure,  as  they  depended  upon 
their  chests  into  which  they  had  put  such  provisions  as  they  were 
used  to  and  had  been  able  to  gather  together  for  the  journey,  such 
as  "dried  apples,  pears,  plums,  mustard,  medicines,  vinegar, 
brandy,  butter,  clothing,  shirts  and  other  necessary  linens,  money, 
and  whatever  they  brought  with  them ;  and  when  their  chests  were 
left  behind,  or  shipped  in  some  other  vessel,  they  had  lack  of 
nourishment." 

Traveling  two  hundred  years  ago,  whether  on  land  or  sea, 
was  no  easy  matter;  it  was,  in  fact,  one  continual  series  of  dis- 
comfort, suffering,  disease,  and  death.  The  food,  even  in  the 
best  of  cases,  would  give  out  or  spoil,  especially  if  the  journey 
was  unusually  long.  Sometimes  the  trip  would  be  made  in  a  few 
weeks,  while  at  other  times  months  would  pass.  From  letters, 
diaries,  narratives,  etc.,  which  have  been  preserved,  we  find  many 
valuable  details  of  the  journey  from  the  Old  to  the  New  World. 
In  the  first  place,  the  prospective  emigrant  must  transport  himself, 
his  family  and  his  goods  to  the  nearest  river,  which,  in  the  majority 
of  cases,  was  the  Rhine,  then  the  great  water  highway.  They  were 
then  shipped  on  boats,  floating  or  sailing  down  stream  until  they 
reached  Holland,  where  the  final  arrangements  for  the  journey 
must  be  made.  One-half  of  the  passage  money  must  be  paid  and 
additional  provisions  secured,  as,  for  instance:  "24  pounds  of  dried 
beef,  15  pounds  of  cheese,  S}i  pounds  of  butter,  garden-seeds, 
agricultural  implements,  linen,  bedding,  table-goods,  powder  and 
lead,  furniture,  earthenware,  stoves,  and  especially  money  to  buy 
seeds,  salt,  horses,  swine,  and  fowls."  This  represents  what  might 
be  considered  a  full  outfit  for  the  intending  settler  at  that  time. 


28  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

However,  the  majority  were  far  from  being  so  well  provided; 
often  they  had  to  depend  upon  the  charity  of  others. 

In  Holland,  the  exiles  were  put  upon  ocean-going  vessels, 
either  with  or  without  their  goods,  and  the  long  sea  trip  began. 
What  must  have  been  their  thoughts  as  their  familiar  homeland 
faded  in  the  distance!  "Sitting  on  boxes  and  bundles,  which 
were  piled  high  in  the  middle  of  the  boat,  could  be  seen  gray- 
haired  men  and  women,  old  and  feeble;  yonder  stood  the  young 
gazing  in  wonder  at  the  shores  as  they  slipped  by.  At  times  they 
were  hopeful,  at  others  sad,  and  their  glances  would  alternate, 
now  to  the  north,  now  to  the  south  toward  their  abandoned  home, 
which  had  driven  them  out  so  unfeelingly,  and  yet  those  green 
hills  and  snow-capped  mountains  they  cannot  forget.  Despite  the 
comforts  of  religion,  their  sadness  could  not  be  overcome,  and 
from  time  to  time  some  one  would  begin  to  sing." 

For  the  first  forty-five  years  no  record  of  the  arrival  of 
foreigners  was  kept,  and  we  cannot,  in  many  instances,  tell  from 
whence,  nor  when,  they  came  into  the  Province.  They  came  from 
every  portion  of  the  German  Empire,  many  from  Switzerland, 
others  of  French  extraction,  who  for  a  generation  or  more  had 
been  settled  in  the  cantons  of  Switzerland  or  the  Netherlands, 
where,  after  acquiring  the  language  of  these  countries,  they  finally 
made  their  way  to  the  shores  of  the  Delaware. 

There  were  three  general  streams  of  the  German  immigration 
to  Pennsylvania  between  the  years  1683  and  1775.  The  first,  in 
1683,  led  to  the  founding  of  Germantown  and  up  to  the  coming 
of  the  Swiss  Mennonites  in  1710;  the  second  from  1710  to  1727, 
when  official  statistics  began  to  be  published;  the  third  period 
extended  to  the  outbreak  of  the  Revolutionary  War,  when  all  im- 
migration ceased  for  the  time  being.  The  emigration  of  the  real 
Palatines  belongs  particularly  to  the  third  period.  By  1727,  the 
influx  of  these  foreigners  into  Pennsylvania  assumed  such  pro- 
portions that  the  authorities  became  alarmed  and  the  Provincial 
Council  adopted  a  resolution  requiring  that  all  masters  of  vessels 
importing  Germans  and  other  foreigners  should,  before  sailing 
from  the  European  port,  make  a  list  of  the  names  of  all  pas- 
sengers, particularly  the  males  over  sixteen;  though  often  the 
names   and   ages   of  all   passengers,    including   the   women   and 


THE  PALATINES  29 

children,  were  set  down.  Then,  upon  reaching  Pennsylvania,  the 
foreigners  were  obliged  to  sign  a  declaration  of  allegiance  and 
subjection  to  the  King  of  Great  Britain  and  of  fidelity  to  the 
Proprietary  of  Pennsylvania.  This  oath  was  first  taken  in  the 
courthouse  at  Philadelphia,  September  21,  1727,  by  109  Palatines. 
If  the  emigrant  could  write,  he  himself  signed  his  name  to  the 
declaration;  in  the  event  that  he  could  not  write,  a  clerk  signed 
for  him. 

Of  the  many  thousands  who  found  their  way  across  the  broad 
Atlantic,  only  a  small  portion  brought  written  records  with  them 
or  took  measures  to  prepare  and  preserve  them  after  their  arrival. 
Some  brought  with  them  that  most  precious  of  all  their  household 
treasures,  the  heavy  old  oak  lidded  German  Bible,  wherein  had 
been  recorded  the  brief  life  and  death  record  of  the  family.  But 
an  infinitely  greater  number  brought  no  record  whatever  by  which 
their  descendants  of  today  can  bind  them  to  their  unknown  kindred 
in  the  Fatherland. 

It  was  not  long  after  the  arrival  of  these  emigrants  in  their 
new  home  before  their  poverty  and  distress  was  changed  into 
prosperity  and  plenty.  This  was  especially  true  of  the  Mennonites 
who  came  when  land  was  cheap  and  they  were  thus  enabled  to 
buy  in  large  quantities.  Later,  property  in  the  immediate  neigh- 
borhood of  Philadelphia  and  adjacent  counties  became  more  and 
more  difficult  to  acquire  and  finally  could  not  be  obtained  at  all. 
Those  who  came  later  were  thus  compelled  to  move  further  out 
upon  the  frontiers,  beyond  the  Blue  Mountain  to  the  north,  or 
across  the  Susquehanna  to  the  west,  many  finding  their  way  south 
into  the  valley  of  Virginia. 

While  many  of  them  were  handicraftsmen,  by  far  the  greater 
number  were  "bauern"  (farmers).  In  fact,  there  was  nothing 
else  to  do  for  many  years.  Even  most  of  those  who  had  mechanical 
trades  were  compelled  to  take  to  tilling  the  fields  because  there 
was  not  much  demand  for  bakers,  printers,  engravers,  etc. 

When  Roman  civilization  first  came  into  contact  with  the  Ger- 
man tribes,  the  latter  were  more  given  to  war  and  the  chase  than 
to  agriculture;  but  they  even  then  grew  corn  and  lived  largely  upon 
the  products  of  the  field.  In  time  they  became  agriculturists,  and 
for  hundreds  of  years  parts  of  Germany  had  been  among  the  best 
cultivated  portions  of  the  Old  World.    In  the  seventeenth  century 


30  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

the  Palatine  and  Rhine  Provinces,  generally,  were  the  gardens 
of  Europe. 

The  first  thing  these  people  did  upon  their  arrival  was  to 
find  out  the  nearest  route  to  the  unsettled  lands  of  the  Proprietary, 
and  thither  they  betook  themselves  at  the  earliest  possible  moment. 
Plunging  into  an  unbroken  wilderness,  often  fifty  or  sixty  miles 
from  the  nearest  habitation,  with  a  skill  inherited  from  thirty 
generations  of  land  cultivators,  these  German  settlers  with  the 
indomitable  industry,  the  earnestness,  and  the  frugality  which 
characterized  them,  soon  changed  the  unbroken  forest  into  beauti- 
ful, thriving,  well-kept  farms.  The  back  woods  had  no  terrors 
for  them.  As  a  race  of  tillers  of  the  soil,  they  were  well  aware 
that  the  character  of  the  timber  was  an  indication  of  the  value  of 
the  ground  on  which  it  stood.  They  were  not  afraid  to  work. 
The  felling  of  the  trees  and  the  clearing  of  the  land  neither  in- 
timidated nor  deterred  them.  The  mightiest  forests  fell  at  the 
resounding  blows  of  the  woodman's  axe.  In  the  fertile  valleys, 
on  the  green  hillsides,  and  in  the  depths  of  the  forest,  wherever 
a  cool  spring  burst  from  the  earth,  their  modest  homes  appeared. 

Sometimes  their  first  shelter  was  a  dugout  in  a  hollow  tree, 
or  a  hastily  constructed  hut,  or  a  rude  tent  beneath  great  trees. 
The  first  house  was  usually  constructed  out  of  logs  and  it  was 
often  a  matter  of  years  before  a  permanent  dwelling  was  built, 
and  frequently  the  second,  and  even  the  third  generation,  assisted  in 
erecting  the  family  homestead.  "These  houses  were  generally  built 
of  stone  (some  of  them  with  dressed  corners),  two  stories  high,  with 
pitched  roof  and  with  cornices  run  across  the  gables  and  around 
the  first  story.  A  large  chimney  in  the  middle,  if  modeled  after 
the  German  pattern,  or  with  a  chimney  at  either  gable-end,  if 
built  after  the  English  or  Scotch  idea.  Many  of  these  imposing 
structures  had  arched  cellars  underneath,  spacious  hallways 
with  easy  stairs,  open  fireplaces  in  most  of  the  rooms,  oak- 
panelled  partitions,  and  windows  hung  in  weights."  Many  of 
these  old  stone  houses  have  inscriptions  set  high  up  on  the 
gable  wall.  Sometimes  this  inscription  may  be  the  initials  of  the 
man  and  wife,  or  perhaps  only  the  date  of  the  building. 

The  farmer's  first  care,  after  getting  his  field  well  cleared, 
was  to  build  an  immense  barn.  This  was  invariably  done  before 
any  steps  were  taken  to  erect  a  permanent  home  for  himself.    These 


THE  PALATINES  31 

great  "Swisser  barns"  were  "two  stories  high,  with  pitched  roof, 
sufficiently  large  and  strong  to  enable  heavy  farm  teams  to  drive 
into  the  upper  story,  to  load  or  unload  grain.  During  the  first 
period  they  were  built  mostly  of  stone,  frame,  or  brick,  from  80  to 
120  feet  long,  and  from  50  to  60  feet  wide,  the  lower  story, 
containing  the  stables,  with  feeding-passages  opening  on  the  front. 
The  upper  story  was  made  to  project  8  or  10  feet  over  the  lower 
in  front,  or  with  a  forebay  attached,  to  shelter  the  entries  to  the 
stables  and  passageways.  It  contained  the  threshing-floors,  mows, 
and  lofts  for  the  storing  of  hay  and  grain," 

Farming  was  a  profession.  The  whole  life  of  the  farmer, 
his  labor,  his  thoughts,  his  hopes  and  fears,  revolved  about  this 
one  thing.  Industry  was  the  highest  virtue;  idleness  and  sin  went 
hand  in  hand.  "When  a  young  man,"  says  Benjamin  Rush,  in 
writing  of  these  early  Germans,  "asks  the  consent  of  his  father 
to  marry  a  girl  of  his  choice,  the  latter  does  not  so  much  inquire 
whether  she  be  rich  or  poor,  but  whether  she  is  industrious  and 
acquainted  with  the  duties  of  a  good  housewife."  In  general,  their 
life  was  uneventful:  "one  common  round  of  daily  task."  The 
three  great  events — birth,  marriage,  and  death — were  the  occasion 
of  more  or  less  celebration,  wedding  and  funeral  being  attended 
by  friends  and  neighbors  from  far  and  near. 

These  German  emigrants  did  not  confine  themselves  to  the 
Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania.  They  moved  to  the  west  and 
the  south  in  all  directions,  until  they  are  to  be  found  in  every 
state  in  the  Union;  and  wherever  they  settled  the  story  of  the 
Pennsylvania  German  piety,  honesty,  industry,  and  success  in  life 
has  been  repeated. 

It  is  interesting  to  follow  these  people  after  reaching  Penn- 
sylvania. The  little  colony  of  thirty-three  persons,  who  settled  in 
Germantown  under  the  leadership  of  Francis  Daniel  Pastorius, 
in  1683,  was  slowly  augmented  during  the  succeeding  years,  and 
they  began  to  penetrate  into  the  regions  beyond.  The  acquisition 
of  land  seems  to  have  been  their  most  prominent  characteristic, 
and  it  may  be  said  to  continue  so  to  be  to  the  present  day.  From 
the  beginning  the  spirit  of  speculation  was  rife  among  them.  The 
earlier  cleared  farms  became  valuable,  and  there  were  always  those 
who,  having  money,  preferred  to  buy  farms  from  which  heavy 
timber  had  been  cleared  and  on  which  good  buildings  were  erected. 


32  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

The  price  for  wild  lands  was  so  reasonable  that  men  would  sell 
their  early  holdings  and,  with  the  aid  of  their  sturdy  sons  and 
daughters,  enter  upon  and  conquer  new  lands  in  the  interior. 
Then,  too,  the  inflowing  tide  of  newcomers  became  so  strong  that 
there  were  no  longer  lands  near  the  older  settlements  to  be  taken 
up,  and  they  were  thus  compelled  to  move  far  into  the  back  woods 
of  what  are  now  the  counties  of  Lancaster,  Berks,  Lebanon,  York, 
Dauphin.  Northampton,  Lehigh,  and  Schuylkill.  Turning  to 
the  south,  they  followed  the  Indian  trails  into  western  Maryland, 
and  down  the  Shenandoah  Valley  into  Virginia  and  the  Carolinas, 
into  Kentucky  and  Tennessee.  Thus  "they  went  to  the  north,  to 
the  south  and  to  the  west.  Soon  they  reached  the  Appalachian 
chain  of  mountains,  climbed  its  wooded  sides  and  debouched  into 
the  wild  regions  beyond  until  the  Ohio  was  in  sight.  But  on,  still 
on,  went  the  resistless  army  of  commonwealth  builders.  Today 
they  are  spread  over  the  most  fertile  lands  of  the  great  West — Ohio, 
Indiana,  Illinois,  Iowa,  Kansas,  Nebraska  and  other  states — the 
entire  continent,  in  fact,  count  among  the  best  of  their  citizens  the 
men  who  went  out  of  Pennsylvania  with  Luther's  Bible  in  their 
hands  and  the  language  of  Schiller  and  Goethe  on  their  lips. 
Wherever  they  went  their  fervent  but  unobtrusive  piety  went  with 
them  and  in  their  quiet  way  brought  credit  on  their  country  and 
on  their  lineage  wherever  they  located  themselves." 


.TC 


I  Ti ' 

■\    :     t: 

he 

its 

full 

pe? 

'■•'■* 

■  .^,.  .  , 

vi'iQ    UD 


Ot    >. 


idin  ^nii 


ui  ci\e  c-iner 


mey  emigrateo.     ^  i\<y  lor.  -' 

perils  of  the  (h^-:  ■■-'  J^ 

of  C^I^?^H;>n"*\  ;A 

Cciriit     VViiii     liiC     jcdl     i"  .f; 

^•n'h .1  ,-.:.     .  ,.-  ;  ^^ 

s..>l».i    .  ■-' 


'■y  did  : 


Old  WorUl.      liii-y 
With  anfi 


me\ 


arging  ih-f  - 

This  Pro. 

■.,<.r.A     Vr--. 

s  n\ 

i 

sveU 

make    t 


mat 


O 


'S" 


•^.»»St;;f:iT»j'--iT:*_<r.,'.i^-'3*Kvi,  •.■-'--•-        '•.-■jiy. '•  ,■-ii'(:^4f56>5^' j?*'.-'.*^  -^'n',.  s'vraip.'iWA^^ivr'A^icSfSiEi^ws';*^ 


The 
PENNSYLVANIA  GERMANS 


IT  IS  only  just  to  say  that  to  all  that  has  gone  to  build  up 
Pennsylvania,  to  enlarge  her  wealth,  to  increase  her  prop- 
erty, to  educate  her  people,  to  give  her  good  government 
from  the  first,  the  German  element  of  the  people  has  contributed 
its  full  share.  It  is  the  religious  spirit,  the  love  of  industry,  the 
peaceful  disposition  of  its  people,  which  has  placed  our  great  State 
of  Pennsylvania  in  the  foremost  ranks  of  the  great  American  nation. 

The  story  of  the  privations,  the  fortitude,  and  the  patriotism 
of  these  early  German  emigrants  is  blended  with  that  of  the  other 
elements  of  the  composite  people  which  formed  the  base  of  the 
grand  structure  of  American  nationality.  They  did  not  leave  the 
Fatherland  to  seek  power  and  glory  in  the  wilderness  to  which 
they  emigrated.  They  forsook  their  native  country  and  braved  the 
perils  of  the  deep  in  search  of  a  land  where  they  might  enjoy  liberty 
of  conscience.  Nor  did  they  come  empty-handed,  being  for  the 
most  part  the  well-to-do,  not  the  paupers,  of  the  Old  World.  They 
came  with  the  fear  of  God  in  their  hearts;  with  energy  and 
industry  in  their  make-up;  with  high  hopes  and  expectations  that 
here  was  freedom  to  worship  as  their  conscience  dictated.  They 
left  us  a  real  inheritance. 

In  1738,  Governor  George  Thomas,  when  urging  the  establish- 
ment of  a  hospital  for  sick  arrivals,  wrote:  "This  Province  has 
been  for  some  years  the  Asylum  of  the!  distressed  Protestants  of 
the  Palatinate  and  other  parts  of  Germany,  and  I  believe  it  may 
with  truth  be  said  that  the  present  flourishing  condition  of  it  is  in 
a  great  measure  owing  to  the  industry  of  these  People ;  and  should 
any  discouragement  divert  them  from  coming  hither,  it  may  well 
be  apprehended  that  the  value  of  their  Lands  will  fall,  and  your 
advances  to  wealth  be  much  slower,  for  it  is  not  always  the  good- 
ness of  the  soil  but  the  number  and  industry  of  the  people  that 
make  a  flourishing  colony." 


34  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

The  name  America  is  of  German  origin.  Little  credit  has 
been  given  to  the  German  people  for  the  part  they  took  in  making 
possible  the  voyage  to  the  unknown  lands  which  resulted  in  the 
discovery  of  America.  Columbus  had  a  teacher,  Martin  Behaim, 
the  great  geographer,  then  living  on  an  island  west  of  Spain,  from 
whom  the  great  discoverer  learned  the  science  which  led  to  the 
discovery  of  the  New  World. 

There  were  many  features  about  the  settlement  of  German- 
town  which  made  it  an  event  of  truly  national  importance.  It  is 
believed  that  no  other  settlement  on  this  side  of  the  Atlantic  had 
so  large  a  proportion  of  men  who  had  won  distinction  abroad  in 
literature  and  polemics.  The  intellectual  thought  of  that  age,  it 
must  be  remembered,  was  mainly  absorbed  in  religious  controversy. 
Francis  Daniel  Pastorius  was  one  of  the  founders  of  Germantown 
and  its  first  schoolmaster.  His  learning  was  probably  not  equalled 
in  any  colony  at  any  time.  He  read  and  wrote  in  the  German, 
Spanish,  English,  French,  Italian,  Greek  and  Latin  languages; 
was  deeply  versed  in  science  and  philosophy;  and  devoted  much 
of  his  life  to  the  pursuit  of  literature.  He  produced  a  number  of 
books,  many  of  which  were  at  the  time  printed.  And  the  great 
Muhlenberg  stands  out  before  us  as  one  of  the  grandest  characters 
that  ever  landed  upon  the  shores  of  the  New  World. 

The  Germans  who  came  to  this  country,  from  the  first,  stood 
for  the  spirit  of  universal  toleration.  Holding  opinions  banned  in 
Europe,  which  only  the  fullness  of  time  could  justify,  standing 
on  what  was  then  the  outer  picket  of  civilization,  they  were  in  the 
front  ranks  of  those  who  best  represented  the  meaning  of  the  colony 
of  Pennsylvania  and  the  principles  lying  at  the  foundation  of  her 
institutions  and  of  those  of  the  great  nation  of  which  she  formed 
a  part. 

On  April  18,  1688,  Francis  Daniel  Pastorius,  Gerhard  Hen- 
dricks, and  the  three  Op  den  Graeff  brothers  sent  to  the  Friends' 
Quarterly  Meeting  at  Philadelphia  the  first  public  protest  ever 
made  on  this  continent  against  the  holding  of  slaves;  a  little  rill 
here  started  which  in  time  became  a  mighty  torrent  and  led  to 
Gettysburg  and  Appomattox. 

The  doctrine  of  the  Anabaptists  (followers  of  Menno  Simon) 
carried  through  Holland  into  England,  resulted  in  the  forming 
of  the  sect  called  Quakers;  and  it  was  the  Anabaptists,  as  Men- 


THE  PENNSYLVANIA  GERMANS  35 

nonites,  who  came  to  Germantown.  The  early  emigrants  were 
intensely  religious  and  their  descendants,  as  a  people,  have  ever 
remained  so.  In  a  literal  sense,  the  Pennsylvania  Germans  are 
in  the  Church.  They  came  here  with  their  German  Bibles,  Liturgy, 
Prayer  Books,  Hymn  Books,  and  Catechisms  and  used  them  well 
Their  sole  dependence  was  prayer  and  supplication  to  the  Deity 
and  an  unbounded  faith  and  trust  in  Providence.  They  had  been 
members  of  the  Christian  Church  in  the  Fatherland ;  all  identified 
with  the  Reformed,  Lutheran,  the  Moravian,  the  Mennonites  or 
some  of  the  Reformation  branches.  Simultaneously  with  their  log 
houses  there  arose  the  log  church  and  the  log  schoolhouse.  The 
plain  log  church,  with  its  pulpit  erected  on  the  stump  of  a  tree, 
with  a  stone  floor,  rude  pews,  and  often  no  stove,  was  dear  to  them. 
The  erection  of  a  church  building  of  stone,  or  brick,  was  a  great 
event;  and  today,  the  many  beautiful  church  buildings,  not  only  in 
towns  and  cities,  but  also  in  rural  districts,  and  the  large  con- 
gregations at  public  services,  testify  to  their  interest  in  the  Christian 
religion. 

The  great  majority  of  these  Germans  who  came  to  Pennsyl- 
vania in  the  early  days  belonged  to  the  Reformed  or  Lutheran 
faith,  the  former  being  chiefly  from  Switzerland  and  the  Palatinate, 
the  latter  from  Wurtemberg  and  other  parts  of  Germany.  While 
jealousies  and  petty  quarrels  had  existed  and  divided  them  in  the 
Fatherland,  the  common  suffering  and  persecutions  had  tended  to 
smooth  over  their  difficulties  and  bring  them  close  together.  The 
members  of  both  congregations  being  poor  and  dwelling  in  thinly 
settled  communities,  were  unable  to  build  separate  churches;  so, 
in  a  majority  of  cases,  they  erected  a  building  in  common  in  which 
they  held  their  services  on  alternate  Sundays,  and  thus  they  founded 
the  Union  Churches,  so  many  of  which  exist  today  throughout  the 
state.  The  old  Trappe  Church  in  Montgomery  County  was  erected 
in  1745.  In  the  graveyard  attached  lies  buried  the  Patriarch 
Muhlenberg,  who  labored  most  faithfully  for  the  spiritual  welfare 
of  his  flock.  And  here,  too,  is  the  last  resting  place  of  his  equally 
great  son,  General  Peter  Muhlenberg,  the  soldier  preacher,  friend 
of  Washington,  and  successful  commander  in  the  Revolutionary 
War. 

As  early  as  1750,  there  were  already  forty  well-established 
German  Reformed  and  thirty  Lutheran  congregations  in  Penn- 


36  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

sylvania.  While,  in  some  cases,  economy  led  to  the  union  of 
Reformed  and  Lutheran,  after  all,  it  testifies  to  the  determination 
of  these  pioneers  to  have  churchly  privileges,  no  matter  what  unique 
and  peculiar  arrangements  had  to  be  made  in  order  to  get  them. 
This  characteristic, — determination  and  tenacity  in  things 
churchly,  religious,  and  spiritual, — made  the  Pennsylvania  Ger- 
mans a  most  valuable  factor  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  body  politic. 
The  Lutheran  and  Reformed  clergy  labored  and  itinerated 
throughout  the  Province  ministering  to  the  sick,  baptizing  chil- 
dren, comforting  the  dying,  catechizing  the  youth,  correcting  the 
erring,  and  establishing  congregations  and  building  churches  wher- 
ever encouragement  was  given.  These  clergymen  were  not  subsi- 
dized by  a  wealthy  corporation;  no  tithes,  government  aid,  or 
perquisites  fell  to  their  lot.  Often  having  to  work  during  the  week 
to  support  their  families,  yet  Sunday  found  them  preaching  to 
congregations  at  far  distant  points.  The  history  of  a  few  of  these 
humble  heroes  has  been  written ;  the  greater  number,  however,  like 
their  flock,  rest  in  unmarked  graves,  while  their  labors  and  teach- 
ings still  live  in  the  influence  engendered  by  their  ministrations. 

In  the  shadow  of  the  church  stood  the  schoolhouse.  The 
Lutheran  and  Reformed  pastors  often  served  as  teachers  during 
the  week,  and,  when  relieved  of  this  duty,  nevertheless  in  connec- 
tion with  the  church  council,  exercised  supervision  over  the  schools. 
Henry  Melchior  Muhlenberg,  the  founder  of  the  Lutheran,  and 
Michael  Schlatter,  the  founder  of  the  Reformed,  churches  in  Penn- 
sylvania, were  both  teachers.  The  latter  came  from  Switzerland, 
in  1746,  and  organized  a  public  school  for  the  promotion  of  edu- 
cation among  the  German  settlers. 

Among  the  various  classes  of  self-sacrificing  heroes  of  the 
early  Province,  none  deserve  more  credit  than  the  German  school- 
master, the  pastor's  helper.  Upon  these  men  devolved  not  alone  the 
education  of  the  youth,  but  in  the  absence  of  a  regular  clergyman, 
or,  in  outlying  districts,  the  spiritual  care  of  the  settlers  as  well. 
His  was  clearly  a  labor  of  love,  as  no  salary  was  attached  to  his 
mission,  his  only  stipend  being  his  board,  obtained  from  the  par- 
ents of  his  scholars.     There  were  frequent  cases  where  a  school- 


Orii^inal  lluildiiig"  of  Ursinus  College. 

This  building  previous  to  1869  was  known  as  the  Pennsylvania  Female 
College,  but  upon  the  organization  of  Ursinus  College  became  the  nucleus  of 
the  present  group  of  buildings. 


Treemount  Seminary.  Xorristown,  Pa. 


THE  PENNSYLVANIA  GERMANS  37 

master  taught  in  two  different  places  at  the  same  time,  serving 
three  days  a  week  in  each.  Francis  Daniel  Pastorius  taught  for 
a  while  in  a  Quaker  school  in  Philadelphia,  and  then  opened  a 
school  in  Germantown,  which  developed  into  the  famous  German- 
town  Academy.  Christopher  Dock,  the  good  "Schulmeister  of  the 
Skibach,"  taught  school  in  the  vicinity  of  Skippack  and  German- 
town  for  half  a  century.  During  this  time  this  quiet,  unassuming 
man  not  only  taught  his  scholars  the  elementary  branches,  but 
moulded  their  morals  and  character  as  well.  He  never  forgot  to 
look  after  the  spiritual  welfare  of  any  scholar  who  had  once  been 
under  his  charge  and  was  wont  to  remain  for  a  short  time  after 
he  had  dismissed  the  school,  to  kneel  in  prayer  and  ask  a  blessing 
upon  his  departing  pupils. 

Although  the  Germans  had  not  established  colleges  before  the 
Revolutionary  War,  they  had  founded  splendid  academies  and 
schools.  Of  all  the  Palatine  colonists  in  Pennsylvania,  the 
Moravians  of  Bethlehem  distinguished  themselves  most  for  edu- 
cation in  its  best  sense.  Their  institutions  of  learning  at  Lititz, 
Nazareth,  and  especially  at  Bethlehem,  were  so  renowned  as  to 
attract  students  from  all  parts  of  the  country,  and  their  educational 
efforts  among  the  Indians  have  never  been  excelled.  Their  labors 
extended  to  the  distant  wilds  of  the  Allegheny  and  Ohio  rivers. 
In  this  self-denying  work  were  engaged  such  missionaries  as  Rauch, 
Beuttnerr,  Senseman,  Martin  Mack,  Christian  Frederick  Post, 
Hacken welder,  David  Zeisberger,  Bishops  Martin  Nitschman, 
Cammerhof,  and  Joseph  Spangenberg. 

In  1749,  a  distinct  boarding  school  for  girls  was  opened  at 
Bethlehem,  probably  the  first  of  its  kind  on  the  continent;  and, 
in  1809,  a  normal  department  was  established  in  Nazareth  Hall. 
It  was  the  first  institution  of  this  kind  exclusively  devoted  to  the 
preparation  of  teachers,  the  oldest  existing  normal  school  in  Amer- 
ica. The  influence  of  these  seminaries  and  schools  is  written  large 
in  the  history  of  education  in  the  country.  No  other  American 
educational  institution,  excepting  a  college,  can  boast  of  such  a 
long  and  honorable  career  as  does  that  of  the  Seminary  at  Naz- 
areth, founded  in  1749,  and  still  flourishing.  At  the  close  of  the 
Revolutionary  War  colleges  were  established:  Franklin,  in  1786, 
and  later  on  Marshall,  Muhlenberg,  and  others. 


38  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

It  has  been  charged  that  the  opposition  to  the  public  school 
system  came  from  the  German  element  in  the  State.  The  system 
of  parochial,  or  congregational,  education  was  in  vogue,  and  those 
opposed  to  the  new  scheme  held  that,  over  and  above  all,  Chris- 
tianity ought  to  enter  into  all  plans  for  educating  the  young.  But 
this  antagonism  was  of  short  duration,  and  these  opponents  came 
to  be  the  heartiest  supporters  of  the  free  schools.  The  earliest 
advocates  and  promoters  of  that  system  which  has  shed  so  much 
lustre  upon  the  State,  were  Governors  George  Wolf  and  Joseph 
Ritner;  while  another  man,  who  more  than  any  one  else  was  the 
originator,  was  William  Audenried,  all  three  of  Pennsylvania 
German  descent. 

After  all,  the  most  conclusive  evidence  of  their  love  of  learn- 
ing, the  early  settlers  gave  when  they  sent  their  children  to  Europe 
in  order  that  they  might  enjoy  the  superior  advantages  offered  by 
the  universities  in  the  Fatherland.  The  eminent  Muhlenberg  edu- 
cated three  of  his  sons  in  this  way,  of  whom  one  became  the  famous 
Major  General  in  the  Revolutionary  War,  one  the  Speaker  of  the 
House  of  Representatives,  and  one  the  eminent  botanist  and  author 
of  the  first  catalogue  of  plants  in  North  America.  A  grandson 
of  the  last  named,  Frederick  A.  Muhlenberg,  was  the  first  President 
of  Muhlenberg  College,  at  Allentown,  and  afterwards  Professor  of 
Greek  at  the  University  of  Pennsylvania. 

The  Pennsylvania  Germans  have  the  honor  of  having  the 
first  printing  press  and  of  the  printing  of  the  first  Bible  in  Penn- 
sylvania, as  well  as  many  other  literary  and  educational  honors. 
Heinrich  Funk  and  Dielman  Kolb,  in  what  is  now  Montgomery 
County,  undertook  to  supervise  the  translation  of  "The  Bloedigh 
Tooniel"  of  Jan  Van  Braght,  the  great  historical  and  biographical 
work  of  the  Mennonites,  which  had  been  written  in  Dutch.  It  was 
published  at  Ephrata,  Lancaster  County,  in  1749,  a  folio  of  1500 
pages.  It  took  thirteen  men  three  years  to  do  the  printing.  The 
paper  was  made  at  Ephrata,  the  binding  done  there,  and  there  was 
nothing  anywhere  else  in  the  colonies  to  compare  with  it  as  an 
illustration  of  literary  and  theological  zeal.  It  was  the  most  ex- 
tensive outcome  of  the  literature  of  the  American  colonists. 


THE  PENNSYLVANIA  GERMANS  39 

The  literature  of  the  Schwenkfelders,  who  came  in  1734,  was 
both  extensive  and  interesting.  It  is  reproduced  for  the  most  part 
in  manuscript,  in  huge  folios  written  on  paper  made  at  the  Ritten- 
house  paper  mill  on  the  Wissahickon,  the  earliest  in  America. 
They  prepared  a  written  description  of  all  writings  of  the  Schwenk- 
felders and  their  authors,  and  is  perhaps  the  first  attempt  at  a 
bibliography  in  this  country.  With  the  establishment  of  the  Print- 
ing Press  by  Christopher  Sauer,  in  Germantown,  in  1738,  there 
began  an  immense  flood  of  German  literature.  Peter  Cornelius 
Plockhoy,  Pastorius,  Telner,  Koster,  Kelpius,  Daniel  Falckner,  and 
Justus  Falckner  all  wrote  books,  some  of  them  of  magnitude  and 
importance.  In  fifty  years  there  must  have  been  produced,  from 
that  press  alone,  two  hundred  and  fifty  books. 

In  Indian  lore  and  language,  none  equalled  Zeisberger  and 
Hacken welder ;  or,  in  diplomacy  with  the  wily  red  men  of  the  forest, 
none  could  compare  with  the  first  Conrad  Weiser  and  Christian 
Frederick  Post.  These  men  all  came  with  the  vanguard  of  civiliza- 
tion. John  Conrad  Weiser  stood  for  ten  years  between  the  Ger- 
man and  English  settlers  in  all  matters  of  dispute.  He  was  officially 
recognized  as  Interpreter  of  Pennsylvania  and  head  of  its  Indian 
Bureau,  and  so  remained  until  his  death.  Many  important  treaties 
were  arranged  and  ratified  by  him  and,  through  his  wise  and  phil- 
anthropic policy,  many  bloody  outbreaks  were  prevented.  His  en- 
tire record  was  ever  above  taint  and  suspicion.  Had  he,  or  the 
splendid  others  who  followed,  failed  in  their  duty  and  allowed  the 
savages  to  pass  their  boundary,  the  progress  of  civilization  and 
development  in  Pennsylvania  would  have  been  delayed  half  a 
century. 

Conrad  Weiser  was  appointed  a  Justice  of  the  Peace  for 
Lancaster  County  in  1741,  and  upon  the  erection  of  Berks  County, 
1752,  was  made  its  first  Judge  of  the  Court,  and  later.  President 
Judge,  which  office  he  held  until  his  death,  1760.  In  1753,  he 
held  the  rank  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  and  was  placed  in  command 
of  the  frontier  between  the  Susquehanna  and  the  Delaware  Rivers, 
his  troops  being  known  as  the  First  Battalion,  Pennsylvania  Regi- 
ment.    Among  the  officers  of  this  regiment  were  Captains  John 


40  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Morgan,  Peter  Trexler,  John  Nicholas  Wetterhold,  John  Jacob 
Wetterhold,  Jacob  Arndt  (later  Major),  Conrad  Weiser  (Jr.), 
Samuel  Weiser,  Wendle  Ury,  Martin  Everhardt,  Andrew  Engle, 
Nicholas  Kern. 

The  Pennsylvania  German,  in  early  Colonial  days,  was  not 
a  great  political  factor  in  the  life  of  the  Commonwealth.  Coming 
from  where  there  was  no  chance  for  political  activity,  from  a  gov- 
ernment that  was  despotic,  and  where  the  country  folk  had  no 
voice  in  the  affairs  of  state,  it  is  not  surprising  that  they  did  not 
seek  public  office,  but,  on  the  other  hand,  preferred  the  quiet  and 
peace  of  these  early  days  in  their  new  homes.  Living  in  com- 
munities of  their  own.,  they  clung  to  their  native  tongue,  some  of 
the  older  ones  never  acquiring  a  knowledge  of  English,  which 
in  a  way  rendered  them  ineligible  for  holding  a  high  public  office 
in  an  English  colony.  Hence,  up  to  the  Revolutionary  War,  the 
political  activity  of  these  people  was  confined  largely  to  local 
affairs. 

They  loved  freedom  more  than  they  hated  war,  these  scions  of 
that  sturdy  race  who,  as  Germans,  overthrew  the  Roman  Empire, 
and  as  Dutch,  broke  the  power  of  Spain.  But  the  loyalty  of  these 
people  to  the  American  cause  was  unquestioned.  The  Mennonites, 
while  opposed  to  war  from  religious  principles,  in  numerous  cases 
furnished  supplies  and  money  to  the  Continental  Army,  though 
they,  like  the  Quakers,  refrained  steadfastly  from  taking  up  arms. 
However,  the  sturdy  Protestant  of  the  Reformed  and  Lutheran 
faiths  were  not  slow  nor  reluctant  to  take  up  arms  against  a  foe 
when  their  homes  and  new-found  liberties  were  endangered. 

As  the  dark  days  of  the  war  approached  and  the  various  con- 
ventions met  in  Philadelphia,  1775-1776,  a  large  proportion  of 
the  delegates  sent  from  Berks,  Lancaster,  Northampton,  and  other 
counties  were  of  German  blood.  They  entered  heartily  into  the 
conflict,  though,  owing  to  their  lack  of  knowledge  of  the  English 
language,  few  rose  to  high  office,  either  civil  or  military;  still  no 
braver  body  of  men  went  forth  from  hillside  and  valley  to  defend 
their  homes  in  the  name  of  God  and  freedom. 

From  Boston  to  Quebec,  in  the  Canada  Campaign,  and  in  the 


b/) 


O 


THE  PENNSYLVANIA  GERMANS  41 

battles  of  that  long  struggle  for  independence,  the  Pennsylvania 
Germans  took  such  a  part  as  makes  for  them  an  indisputable  place 
in  history.  Their  blood  stained  the  soil  of  every  battlefield  during 
the  conflict.  The  gallant  and  patriotic  services  of  the  Hutleys,  the 
Heisters,  the  Muhlenbergs,  Weitzels,  Hausegger,  Klotz,  Nagel, 
Wiedman,  Ziegler,  Kechlein,  Wolper,  and  others  upon  the  well- 
fought  battlefields  at  Trenton,  Princeton,  Long  Island,  Brandy- 
wine,  Germantown,  Monmouth,  and  Yorktown  is  well  established. 
And  since  the  days  of  Independence,  their  descendants,  generation 
after  generation,  have  been  distinguished  upon  every  well-fought 
battlefield  of  the  Republic.  From  Lundy's  Lane,  in  the  swamps 
of  Florida,  through  the  cactus-crowned  plains  of  Mexico,  and  from 
Manassas  to  Appomattox,  on  the  poppy-strewn  fields  of  France, 
they  were  there,  officers  and  men,  reflecting  honor  and  renown  upon 
their  state  and  their  nation. 

When  the  nation  was  being  formed,  it  was  Barons  Steuben 
and  De  Kalb  and  others  who  did  so  much  to  organize  the  army 
and  aid  Washington  in  disciplining  his  troops.  It  was  Michael 
Hillegas,  John  Steinmetz,  Abraham  Bickley,  Joseph  Bliever, 
Heinrich  Keppel,  Frederick  Hassenklever,  Isaac  Melchior,  John 
Schaeffer,  and  Andrew  Doz,  nine  Pennsylvania  Germans,  who 
gave  their  personal  bond  to  buy  provisions  for  Washington's  half- 
starved  army;  and  when  the  subject  was  under  debate,  it  was  an- 
other, Christopher  Ludwig,  a  poor  gingerbread  baker,  who  settled 
the  controversy  by  having  his  name  put  down  for  £200. 

The  influence  of  the  Pennsylvania  German  has  been  felt  in 
every  constitutional  convention  from  July,  1775,  to  the  last  body 
which  gave  us  our  present  fundamental  law.  The  Provincial  Con- 
vention of  1775,  held  at  Philadelphia,  which  approved  the  con- 
duct and  proceedings  of  the  Continental  Congress,  appeared  as 
delegates  from  Pennsylvania  such  representatives  of  the  German 
settlers  as  Hassenklever,  Melcher,  Ludwig,  Schlosser,  Kuhn,  Graaf, 
Hay,  Schultz,  Levan,  Gehr,  Kechlein,  Arndt,  and  Weitzel.  After 
the  constitution  had  been  framed  there  was  a  great  doubt  whether 
it  would  be  accepted  by  the  states.  It  is  generally  conceded  that 
the  adoption  of  the  work  of  the  convention  was  due  to  the  early 


42  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

action  taken  by  Pennsylvania.  She  was  the  first  of  the  colonies 
to  declare  in  favor  of  it.  A  heated  debate  followed,  and,  at  that 
eventful  crisis,  the  very  earliest  effort  in  behalf  of  the  new  gov- 
ernment came  from  the  Pennsylvania  Germans.  The  Constitution 
was  finally  signed  on  September  17,  1787.  On  September  24th, 
there  was  presented  to  the  Pennsylvania  Assembly,  this  petition 
from  two  hundred  and  fifty  inhabitants  of  the  town  of  German- 
town  : 

To  the  Honorable  the  Representatives  of  the  freemen  of  the  Com- 
monwealth of  Pennsylvania  in  General  Assembly  met,  the  petition  and 
declaration  of  the  inhabitants  of  Germantown  respectfully  showeth,  that 
your  petitioners  have  seen  with  great  pleasure  the  proposed  Constitution 
of  the  United  States,  and  as  they  conceive  it  to  be  wisely  calculated  to 
form  a  perfect  union  of  the  States,  as  well  as  to  secure  to  themselves  and 
to  posterity  the  blessings  of  peace,  liberty  and  safety,  they  have  taken  this 
method  of  expressing  their  earnest  desires  that  the  said  Constitution  may 
be  adopted  as  speedily  as  possible  by  the  State  of  Pennsylvania  in  the  man- 
ner recommended  by  the  resolution  of  the  late  honorable  convention. 

The  Assembly  at  that  time  was  composed  of  sixty-two  mem- 
bers. When  the  adoption  of  the  Constitution  came  to  be  determined, 
there  were  forty-three  votes  in  favor  of  it  and  nineteen  against  it. 
Among  the  sixty-two  members  there  were  twelve  Pennsylvania 
Germans.  To  their  everlasting  honor  be  it  said  every  man  voted 
in  favor  of  the  resolution.  They  were  Jacob  Hiltzheimer,  Gerardus 
Wynkoop,  Michael  Schmyser,  Gabriel  Heister,  Philip  Kraemer, 
Joseph  Heister,  Peter  Trexler,  Jr.,  Peter  Burkhalter,  Frederick 
Antes,  Jacob  Pfeiff,  Valentine  Opp,  and  Emanuel  Carpenter. 

By  far  the  greater  majority  of  the  German  emigrants  who 
came  to  these  shores  were  of  a  peaceful  disposition.  They  came 
to  escape  from  feudal  oppression  and  a  state  of  religious  intoler- 
ation  then  existing  in  parts  of  Germany.  The  charge  is  often 
made  that  during  the  Revolutionary  struggle  the  majority  of  the 
Pennsylvania  Germans  were  non-combatant.  Many  of  them  were 
non-combatant  from  religious  conviction  and  refused  to  bear  arms; 
but  this  fact  did  not  make  them  antagonistic  to  the  patriot  cause. 


O 


o 
H 

c 

03 


C3 

1 

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THE  PENNSYLVANIA  GERMANS  43 

The  commissary  stores,  during  the  most  critical  period  of  the 
struggle,  were  almost  all  supplied  by  the  Pennsylvania  Germans. 
The  men  and  farms  supplied  the  substance,  while  the  women  fur- 
nished the  clothing,  quilts,  and  stockings  for  the  soldiers,  and  even 
some  of  them,  too  old  to  sew  or  knit,  picked  lint  and  made  bandages 
for  the  wounded.  And  further,  when  after  disastrous  battles,  the 
buildings  and  institutes  of  these  people  were  seized  by  the  military 
authorities  and  turned  into  hospitals  and  the  peaceful  occupants 
forced  to  seek  shelter  where  best  they  could,  as  was  the  case  at 
Ephrata,  Bethlehem,  Lititz,  and  elsewhere,  both  men  and  women 
nursed  the  sick  and  dying,  no  matter  how  loathsome  or  pestilential 
the  disease;  in  many  cases  sacrificing  their  own  health  and  lives 
for  humanity's  sake. 

And  yet  it  was  not  in  the  times  of  war — "those  times  that 
tried  men's  souls" — so  much  as  in  the  peaceful  times,  when  the 
real  work  of  upbuilding  the  national  character  had  to  be  done, 
that  the  influence  of  these  people  was  strongest  in  the  country. 
In  their  steadfastness  of  purpose,  it  was  the  plodding  patience,  the 
characteristic  that  they  possess  of  settling  down  on  a  farm  some- 
where and  staying  there  instead  of  roaming  about  indefinitely, 
cultivating  it  and  making  it  give  up  its  wealth — it  is  this  char- 
acteristic which  has  done  so  much  in  times  of  peace  for  the  pros- 
perity of  the  country  and  for  the  establishment  of  the  nation. 

Pennsylvania  is  a  great  agricultural  state,  and  the  German 
settlers  have  been  the  leaders  in  that  great  industry  in  the  Com- 
monwealth. It  is  their  industry  and  thrift  that  has  made  the 
Pennsylvania  farms  the  pride  of  the  nation,  and  in  no  section  of 
the  country  can  be  found  better  cultivated  farms,  better  fences, 
better  houses,  better  barns,  a  larger  variety  of  crops. 

It  was  this  people  who  brought  with  them  to  this  country 
their  inborn  love  for  the  masterpieces  of  musical  creation,  and 
they  have  been  largely  instrumental  in  introducing  to  the  American 
churches  the  uplifting  anthems  of  Mozart,  Beethoven,  Haydn, 
Handel,  Mendelssohn,  Bach,  and  others.  They  also  brought  with 
them  that  lofty  style  of  congregational  music  called  chorales. 

The  Pennsylvania  German  has  been  the  leader  in  the  "art 


44  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

preservation  of  all  arts."  In  Germantown  began  the  weaving  of 
linen  and  of  cloth  and  the  manufacture  of  paper.  Christopher 
Sauer,  the  Germantown  printer,  manufactured  the  first  type,  printed 
the  first  Bible  in  a  European  language,  and  issued  the  first  work 
on  the  philosophy  of  teaching,  in,  America.  The  Ephrata  press 
was  a  remarkable  one,  and  more  books  were  issued  by  that  com- 
munity and  by  Sauer,  prior  to  the  Revolution,  than  from  all  New 
England  and  New  York  printing  presses  together.  They  were 
the  first  piano  makers  in  America,  the  first  chemists,  tanners,  glass 
blowers,  and  makers  of  furniture.  The  father  of  the  liberty  of  the 
press,  in  this  country,  was  a  German.  The  first  genealogical  work 
published  in  America  was  issued  by  the  Ephrata  Society.  To 
Gustavus  Peters,  we  are  indebted  for  stereotyping  and  as  the  in- 
ventor of  printing  in  oil. 

In  a  century  of  Governors  of  the  Commonwealth,  one-half 
were  of  Pennsylvania  German  ancestry,  wholly  or  in  part,  men 
equal  in  ability  and  statesmanship  to  any  who  have  filled  the 
executive  chair:  Simon  Snyder,  Heister,  Shultz,  Ritner,  Wolf, 
Shunk,  Hartranft,  all  of  whom  contributed  toward  the  founding 
and  fostering  of  the  Common  Free  School;  James  Addams  Beaver, 
the  gifted,  talented  statesman,  the  brave  and  valorous  soldier,  and 
Christian  gentleman;  Samuel  W.  Pennypacker,  the  scholar  and 
historian. 

The  annals  of  Pennsylvania  are  made  luminous  with  the 
splendor  of  the  services  of  those  heroes  of  the  Gospel  of  Christ: 
Muhlenberg,  the  saintly,  beloved,  and  grandest  patriarch  of  the 
early  church ;  Schlatter,  the  disciple  of  the  Swiss  Reformation,  God- 
fearing and  faithful;  Cammerhoff,  the  zealous  and  devoted  mis- 
sionary; Spangenberg,  the  devout  enthusiast;  and  the  host  that 
followed  them.  In  theological  literature,  we  find  the  names  of 
Rauch,  Schumaker,  and  Krauth,  and  the  religious  leaders:  Otter- 
bein,  who  established  the  United  Brethren;  Winebrenner,  the 
Church  of  God;  Albright,  the  Evangelical  Church.  David  Ritten- 
house,  the  patriot  astronomer,  whose  name  is  a  common  heritage 
of  America.  In  scientific  literature,  there  is  Haldeman  in  arch- 
aeology, Muhlenberg  and  Shaeffer  in  botany,  and  Rathorn  in  ento- 


^ 


THE  PENNSYLVANIA  GERMANS  '     45 

mology,  and  Leidy,  the  scientist;  Ibach  and  Engelman,  the  noted 
almanac  makers.  And  it  was  a  Pennsylvania  German  who  gave 
to  the  world  the  greatest  astronomical  gift,  the  Lick  Observatory, 
in  California.  In  law,  as  jurist,  few  equalled  Pennypacker,  Hey- 
drick,  Albright,  Bittenger,  Bucher,  and  a  score  of  others,  brilliant 
in  the  legal  profession.  The  field  of  medicine  in  Pennsylvania 
is  largely  occupied  by  that  class,  many  of  whom  have  risen  to  high 
positions  in  medical  and  surgical  practice :  Goss,  and  the  brothers 
Leidy,  Wistar,  Kuhn,  and  Seidensticker,  of  the  University  of  Penn- 
sylvania, De  Schweinitz,  and  scores  of  others.  Among  the  his- 
torians: Rupp  and  Hutley,  Harbaugh  and  Reichel,  Egle,  Penny- 
packer,  Biedelman  and  Sachse,  represent  Pennsylvania  Germans 
creditably.  To  Governor  Alter  belongs  the  honor  of  first  putting 
in  actual  practice  the  electric  telegraph.  And  so  we  could  enumer- 
ate indefinitely.  But  back  of  all  that  has  been  achieved  by  these 
worthy  scions  of  a  worthy  race  stands  the  German  mother,  ever 
patient,  self-denying,  devout,  industrious,  thrifty,  her  sole  aim  to 
raise  her  family  in  the  fear  of  the  Lord. 

'Their  monuments  are  their  farms  and  farmhouses,  schools 
and  schoolhouses,  and  their  great  Swiss  barns  which  adorn  the 
hills  and  fertile  vales  which  make  the  land  of  Pennsylvania  an 
earthly  paradise.  Colleges  and  Churches,  Temples  of  Justice, 
Almshouse  and  Orphans'  Homes,  Farmers'  Institute,  Agricultural 
and  Horticultural  Societies  and  their  annual  agricultural  and  in- 
dustrial exhibitions;  manufacturing  enterprises;  their  princely 
mercantile  and  banking  houses,  palatial  markets,  hotels  and  resi- 
dences and  battlefields  near  and  far  and  the  valor  of  Pennsyl- 
vania regiments  there  recorded.  These  are  the  most  fitting  and 
ever-enduring  monuments  to  the  industry,  virtue,  munificence, 
patriotism,  and  intelligence  of  this  great  brave  and  free  people." 

When  Germantown  was  laid  out,  Francis  Daniel  Pastorius 
opened  what  was  called  the  Germantown  Grund  und  Lager  Buch, 
containing  the  records  of  the  conveyance  of  land,  and  he  wrote 
the  following  prefatory  invocation  in  Latin,  which  was  happily 
rendered  into  English  verse  by  John  Greenleaf  Whittier: 


46         THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Emigration  of  German  Quakers  and  Mennonites  to  Pennsylvania 

Hail  to  posterity ! 
Hail,  future  men  of  Germanopolis ! 
Let  the  young  generations  yet  to  be 

Look  kindly  upon  thee 
Think  how  your  fathers  left  their  native  land, 
Dear  German  land,  O !  sacred  hearths  and  homes  1 
And  where  the  wild  beast  roams 

In  patience  planned 
New  forest  homes  beyond  the  mighty  sea, 

There  undisturbed  and  free 
To  live  as  brothers  of  one  family. 

What  pains  and  cares  befell, 

What  trials  and  what  fears. 
Remember,  and  wherein  we  have  done  well 
Follow  our  footsteps,  men  of  coming  years; 

Where  we  have  failed  to  do 

Aright,  or  wisely  live, 
Be  warned  by  us,  the  better  way  pursue. 
And  knowing  we  are  human,  even  as  you, 

Pity  us  and  forgive. 

Farewell,  Posterity; 

Farewell,  dear  Germany; 

Forever  more  farewell! 


i#  r^  r: 


A 

I 

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re 

of 

Gtr- 
it 
f 

e 
t 

j'ihmiiUhidi       ,rger' 

1715,..  '""S*  ""  th«  26tb  of  February' 

I  ;'  "'"*^':'''    However,  it  is  not  believed  that 
S  '"We  ot  this  family,  as  there  is  Jlr      t 

.   ^hn<--*u        T  /'  «-  lucre  IS  evKlence  to 

ihe  citv  ,  i ,,,.?.  1        "  '"■'"'"'  ^"*''^'"'^''  ''"""^  from,  or  near 

■      name  Str^^r  ^^''■'' "'""^^'^''■^°"^'°^- 
name  .Strassburfjer  is  of  nnr^iv.  t    ,     • 

^^  d,,  diird,  those  derived 
they  came,  and  from 

-Ve  r-n  quickly  elimi- 

^^J>d  group,  as 

'■  those  de- 

ttronymic 

■d  not  the 

-^ed  by  the 


•  Pamily  Names  in  }'■ 


fance 


o 


# 


The 
STRASSBURGER  FAMILY 


JOHANN  ULRICH  STRASSBURGER,  a  native  of  Ger- 
many and  the  earliest  known  ancestor  of  the  family  of  that 
name,  was  born  about  1690,  probably  in  the  province  of 
Alsace-Lorraine.  The  first  information  concerning  him  is  the 
record  of  his  marriage,  which  took  place  February  26,  1715,  at 
Ober  Ingelheim,  a  village  in  the  German  Palatinate.  The  pastor 
of  the  Protestant  Evangelical  Church,  who  performed  the  ceremony, 
set  down  upon  the  church  register  that  Johann  Ulrich  Strassburger, 
of  Ober  Diebach,  was  united  in  marriage  on  the  26th  of  February, 
1715,  with  Maria  Elizabetha,  widow  of  Peter  Flucken.  Ober  Die- 
bach  is  a  village  lying  on  the  west  bank  of  the  Rhine,  a  little  over 
nine  miles  northeast  of  Bingen.  However,  it  is  not  believed  that 
this  was  the  original  home  of  this  family,  as  there  is  evidence  to 
show  that  in  all  probability  the  earlier  ancestors  came  from,  or  near, 
the  city  of  Strassburg,  the  capital  of  Alsace-Lorraine. 

The  name  Strassburger  is  of  purely  Teutonic  origin  and  is 
one  of  that  group  of  family  names  which  derived  their  appellation 
from  their  place  of  residence.  There  are  three  general  groups  of 
family  names — first,  those  derived  from  personal  names;  second, 
those  derived  from  a  trade  or  profession;  and,  third,  those  derived 
from  places  where  individuals  lived,  whence  they  came,  and  from 
personal  peculiarities,  physical  or  mental.^  We  can  quickly  elimi- 
nate the  first  and  second,  and  the  latter  part  of  the  third  group,  as 
the  source  of  origin,  which  leaves  us  the  place  names,  or  those  de- 
rived from  localities,  as  the  sub-division  in  which  this  patronymic 
belongs.  That  the  place  gave  the  name  to  the  family  and  not  the 
family  to  the  place,  as  frequently  was  the  case,  is  evidenced  by  the 


^  Robert  Fergueson,  Teutonic  Name  System,  Applied  to  Family  Names  in  France, 
England,  and  Germany. 


48  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

fact  that  the  foundation  of  Strassburg  dates  back  prior  to  the  fourth 
century,  whereas  the  family  names  in  Germany  did  not  come  into 
existence  much  before  the  twelfth  century. 

Strassburg,  a  fortified  city  of  first  rank,  is  situated  at  the  junc- 
tion of  the  Rivers  111  and  Breusch,  about  a  mile  west  of  the  Rhine, 
in  one  of  the  most  fertile  districts  in  the  Upper-Rhenish  plain.  It 
has  always  held  a  conspicuous  place  in  history,  having  been  origi- 
nally built  and  fortified  by  the  Romans,  and  alternately  held  by 
Germany  or  France  since  the  fifth  century.  The  French  form  of 
the  name  is  Strasbourg,  the  German,  Strassburg.  The  original  site 
seems  to  have  been  occupied  by  a  Celtic  settlement,  which  the  Ro- 
mans conquered  about  357  and  fortified  as  a  barrier  against  the 
German  incursion,  giving  it  the  name  of  Argentoratum,  and  it  after- 
wards became  the  headquarters  of  the  eighth  legion.  About  half 
a  century  later,  the  whole  of  the  district  now  called  Alsace  fell  into 
the  hands  of  the  Teutonic  people,  who  retained  it  until  the  time  of 
Clovis  (496),  who  again  drove  them  back  across  the  Rhine.  The 
town  then  passed  to  the  Franks,  who  named  it  Strataburgum,  or 
Strassburg,  which  signifies  a  fortified  town  upon  the  highway,  the 
term  applied  to  the  old  Roman  highways,  or  streets,  being  derived 
from  the  Latin  Stratum,  or  Stratura,  whose  equivalent  in  old  Saxon 
is  Strata;  Lower  German,  Strate;  old  High  German,  Stratza;  North 
High  German,  Strasze;  while  in  the  Latin  burgos  or  burgus,  sig- 
nifies a  castle,  fort,  or  redoubt,  from  which  comes  the  German  word, 
burg  or  bur  gen;  Anglo-Saxon,  beorgem;  the  modern  English,  bor- 
ough, Webster's  definition  of  which  is  to  hide,  save,  defend. 

The  bishopric  of  Strassburg  was  founded  during  the  reign  of 
Clovis,  and  soon  attained  great  wealth  and  importance.  The  early 
history  of  Strassburg,  as  is  the  case  of  most  Episcopal  cities,  con- 
sists mainly  of  a  record  of  the  struggle  between  the  bishops  and  the 
citizens,  the  latter,  as  they  grew  in  wealth  and  power,  endeavoring 
to  throw  off  the  fetters  of  ecclesiastical  rule,  which  they  felt  inter- 
fered with  their  full  development.  The  conflict  was  finally  decided 
in  favor  of  the  citizens  by  the  battle  of  Oberhausenbergen,  in  1262 ; 
and  the  position  of  a  free  imperial  city,  which  had  been  conferred 
upon  Strassburg  by  Philip,  of  Swabia  (1200),  was  not  again  dis- 
puted. Freedom  from  the  domination  of  Catholic  bishops  was  fol- 
lowed by  an  internal  revolution  (1332),  which  admitted  the  guilds 
to  a  share  in  the  government  of  the  city  and  impressed  upon  it  the 


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THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  49 

democratic  character  that  it  bore  down  to  the  French  Revolution. 
It  was  here  in  841  the  famous  Strassburg  Oath  was  taken.  This 
was  an  agreement  entered  into  by  the  three  sons,  and  successors,  of 
Charlemagne  to  refrain  from  making  further  war  upon  each  other. 
As  both  the  Franks  and  Germans  were  signatories  to  this  document, 
Louis,  in  order  to  be  understood  by  the  army  of  Charles,  took  the 
oath  in  a  language  found  to  be  the  beginning  of  modern  French, 
while  his  brother  Charles  subscribed  to  the  same  in  a  German 
dialect. 

Strassburg  early  became  one  of  the  most  flourishing  of  im- 
perial towns.  The  Reformation  found  ready  acceptance  among  its 
people,  foremost  of  whom  was  Martin  Bucer,  and  it  was  skillfully 
piloted  by  its  great  leaders  through  the  many  devastating  religious 
wars  following  the  rise  of  Protestantism.  In  the  Thirty  Years 
War  the  town  escaped  molestation  by  observing  a  prudent  neu- 
trality.' 

Louis  XIV  came  to  the  throne  of  France  and  shortly  after- 
ward began  his  wars  of  conquest  and  entered  Alsace  with  the  in- 
tention of  taking  that  territory  and  forcibly  annexing  it  to  his  do- 
minion. He  captured  a  large  part  of  the  province,  but,  not  content, 
he  determined  to  conquer  the  remaining  free  cities  which  belonged 
to  Germany.  The  Catholic  Bishop  of  Strassburg  was  his  secret 
agent  and  three  of  the  magistrates  of  the  city  were  bribed  to  assist. 
In  the  fall  of  1681,  when  nearly  all  the  merchants  were  absent 
attending  the  fair  at  Frankfort,  a  powerful  French  army  suddenly 
appeared  before  Strassburg.  Between  force  outside  and  treachery 
within,  the  city  surrendered;  on  October  23,  King  Louis  made  his 
triumphant  entry,  being  welcomed  by  the  traitorous  bishop.  The 
great  Cathedral,  which  had  long  been  in  the  possession  of  the  Prot- 
estants, was  given  up  to  this  bishop;  all  Protestant  functionaries 
were  deprived  of  their  offices,  and  the  clergymen  driven  from  the 
city.  French  names  were  given  to  the  streets,  and  the  inhabitants 
were  commanded,  under  heavy  penalties,  to  lay  aside  their  German 
costume  and  adopt  the  fashions  of  France.  No  official  claim  or 
declaration  of  war  preceded  this  move  on  the  part  of  Louis  XIV. 
The  people  of  Germany  had  been  so  long  accustomed  to  violence 


Encyclopedia  Britannica.     Lippincott's  Gazetteer  of  the  World. 


50  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

and  outrage,  and  the  despotic  independence  of  each  state  had  sup- 
pressed anything  like  national  sentiment,  that  this  treachery  pro- 
duced slight  protest  throughout  Germany.  The  Treaty  of  Ryswick 
was  concluded  on  September  20,  1697,  which  brought  comparative 
peace  for  the  time  being.  By  its  provisions  France  retained  Strass- 
burg  and  the  greater  part  of  Alsace  and  it  was  also  decreed  that  the 
districts  which  had  been  made  Catholic  by  force,  during  the  in- 
vasion, should  remain  so.^  This  naturally  brought  about  a  partial 
reaction  in  favor  of  Roman  Catholicism,  but  the  city  remained 
essentially  German  until  the  French  Revolution,  when  it  was  de- 
prived of  its  privileges  as  a  free  town  and  sank  to  the  level  of  a 
French  Provincial  Capital.  It  was  here  Rouget  de  ITsle  wrote  the 
famous  French  national  air  ''La  Marseillaise."  In  the  war  of  1870, 
Strassburg,  after  a  siege  of  seven  weeks,  surrendered  to  the  Ger- 
mans, but  in  1920,  by  the  treaty  of  Versailles,  it  has  again  been 
annexed  to  France. 

Strassburg  is  divided  by  the  arms  of  the  111,  which,  on  its  way 
to  join  the  Rhine  at  a  distance  of  about  a  mile,  intersects  the  town 
in  all  directions  by  canals,  dividing  it  into  three  parts,  of  which 
the  central  is  the  most  important.  A  majority  of  the  streets  are 
narrow  and  irregular,  and  the  quaint  aspect  of  a  free  mediaeval 
town  has,  to  a  certain  extent,  been  maintained.^ 

It  was  near  this  historic  old  town  that  the  ancient  family  of 
Strassburger  no  doubt  originated ;  at  one  time,  perhaps,  taking  part 
in  aggressive  campaigns  of  conquest,  or  again  fighting  desperately 
to  defend  their  homes  and  loved  ones  from  a  ruthless  invader ;  now 
enjoying  a  short  period  of  peace  and  prosperity,  only  to  later  suffer 
untold  agonies  from  religious  persecutions,  unfortunately  carried 
on  by  the  Catholic  Church  against  those  who  had  the  courage  to 
embrace  the  Protestant  faith  at  the  time  of  Martin  Luther  and  the 
Reformation.  It  may  be  that  during  the  last  quarter  of  the  seven- 
teenth century,  when  the  Alsatian  Capital  and  province  were  seized 
by  King  Louis,  some  member  or  members  of  the  family  turned 
their  backs  upon  their  old  home,  of  which  they  no  longer  felt  a  part, 
and  sought  a  new  abiding  place  in  the  Protestant  Palatinate. 


1  Bayard  Taylor,  History  of  Germany,  pp.  324-328. 

2  Murray's  Handbook  of  Northern  Germany. 


Ober  Ingelheim,  Germany. 


Ancient  Gateway,  Ober  Ingelheim. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  51 

The  next,  and  by  far  most  interesting  point,  is  Ober  Ingelheim, 
a  small  village  in  the  Province  of  Rhine  Hesse,  District  of  Bingen, 
on  the  river  Salz,  near  its  confluence  with  the  Rhine,  about  half 
way  between  Mayence  (Mainz)  and  Bingen,  in  the  southern  part 
of  the  old  German  Palatinate.  Nieder  Ingelheim  lies  about  three- 
quarters  of  a  mile  distant,  and  the  name  Ingelheim  is  given  the  sta- 
tion, which  serves  the  two  villages,  on  the  railroad  leading  from 
Coblenz  to  Mayence.  Situated  about  a  mile  and  a  half  from  the 
Rhine  in  the  midst  of  a  rich  wine-producing  district,  the  red  wine 
bearing  the  brand  Ober  Ingelheimer,  is  known  the  world  over. 
Ober  Ingelheim  was  originally  an  imperial  village,  while  Nieder 
Ingelheim  was  once  the  site  of  a  celebrated  palace  of  Charlemagne, 
described  by  ancient  writers  as  an  edifice  of  great  magnificence. 
Some  writers  suppose  it  was  the  birth-place  of  the  great  king.  From 
Bingen  to  Mayence  is  about  seventeen  miles. 

Leaving  Bingen  by  the  less  traveled  road  on  the  left  bank 
of  the  Rhine,  one  ascends  a  long  but  gradual  eminence,  near  the 
top  of  which  stands  a  small  obelisk  erected  by  the  French  bearing 
the  inscription:  "Route  de  Charlemagne,  termine  en  Van  I  du 
regne  de  Napoleon"  (The  Charlemagne  Road,  completed  in  the 
first  year  of  the  reign  of  Napoleon).  From  the  heights  a  little 
further  on  the  view  is  most  beautiful,  extending  out  over  the  Rhine, 
throughout  the  whole  of  the  Rheingau,  as  far  as  the  distant  range 
of  the  Taunus.  It  was  in  this  situation  Charlemagne,  in  768-776, 
built  his  favorite  residence  of  Ingelheim,  or  "angel  home."  This 
magnificent  palace  he  decorated  with  a  hundred  columns  of  marble 
and  porphyry,  rich  mosaics,  sculptures  and  other  works  of  art, 
sent  to  him  for  this  purpose  from  Ravenna,  by  Pope  Hadrian  I. 
It  was  burned  down  in  1270,  but  was  restored  by  Charles  IV  in 
1354.  A  large  part  of  the  palace  is  standing  today.  The  four 
columns  of  Synete  which  adorn  the  covered  well  or  fountain  at  the 
castle  at  Heidelberg,  were  carried  from  the  palace  at  Ingelheim  to 
Heidelberg  by  Count  Palatine  Ludwig. 

Charles  the  Great  (Karl  Magnus),  or  Charlemagne,  as  he  is 
known  in  history,  reigned  for  about  half  a  century  and  stands  out 
as  the  greatest  man  of  Europe  for  a  thousand  years.  Although  he 
could  not  write,  he  was  a  man  of  true  culture.  He  secured  learned 
men  for  the  clergy,  monastic  and  Catholic  schools  were  opened 
throughout  the  empire,  and  he  established  for  the  young  nobles  of 


52  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

the  court  the  famous  school  of  the  Palace.  By  his  magnificent 
basilica  in  Aachen  (Aix  la  Chapelle),  his  favorite  capital,  and  by 
the  palaces  he  built  at  Ingelheim  and  Nimeguen,  he  fostered  a  love 
of  art  among  the  more  advanced  of  his  German  subjects.  He  was 
taken  sick  and  died,  in  814,  on  a  small  island  on  the  Rhine  opposite 
Ingelheim, 

In  the  church  at  Nieder  Ingelheim  is  a  monument  of  one  of 
Charlemagne's  four  queens,  a  rudely  carved  stone  on  which  a 
female  figure,  cro\\Tied  and  in  regal  attire,  is  discernible.  It  was  at 
Ingelheim,  on  December  31,  1105,  that  the  convocation  of  the 
Bishops  of  Mayence,  Cologne,  and  Worms  dethroned  Emperor 
Henry  IV.' 

The  Protestant  St.  Remigiuskirche  was  once  the  chapel  of  the 
palace,  but  as  it  has  been  repeatedly  restored,  nothing  of  the  orig- 
inal is  now  left  except  some  parts  of  the  north  transept. 

The  old  Evangelical  Church  at  Ober  Ingelheim  dates  from 
the  thirteenth  century.  It  is  a  handsome  building,  adorned  with 
painted  windows  representing  scenes  in  the  life  of  Charlemagne.  It 
was  restored  about  1875. 

It  is  upon  the  church  book  of  this  old  Protestant  Evangelical 
Church,  at  Ober  Ingelheim,  that  are  found  recorded  the  first  and 
second  marriages  of  Johann  Ulrich  Strassburger,  and  the  births  of 
all  of  his  children,  ten  in  number,  the  eldest  of  whom  was  Johann 
Andreas,  born  January  19,  1716,  who  came  to  Pennsylvania  in 
1742.  He  went  back  to  Germany,  but  returned  in  1769,  settling  in 
Bucks  County,  where  he  died  a  few  years  later. 

The  following  is  a  copy  of  the  records  concerning  the  Strass- 
burger family,  which  appear  in  this  old  Kirchenbuch,  now  in  the 
public  office  (Standesamt)  at  Ober  Ingelheim,  as  communicated  to 
Mr.  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  of  Philadelphia,  by  Burgermeister  Jacob 
Strassburger  of  Ober  Ingelheim,  in  1896^ 


1  Encyclopcsdia  Britannica.  Lippincott's  Gazetteer  of  the  World.  K.  Baedeker : 
The  Rhine  from  Rotterdam  to  Constance,  p.  126.  John  Murray:  Handbook  of 
Northern  Germany,  4th  Ed.,  London. 

2  In  1896,  Mr.  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  of  Philadelphia,  and  his  wife,  who  is  a  great- 
granddaughter  of  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger,  were  in  Germany.  A  letter  written 
by  Mr.  Dotterer  to  Jacob  Strassburger,  Burgermeister  of  Ober  Ingelheim,  requesting 
information  as  to  his  ancestry,  brought  forth  this  record.  Burgermeister  Strassburger 
was  the  great-grandson  of  Johann  Adam,  brother  to  Johann  Andreas  Strass- 
burger.    In  a  subsequent  letter,  the  Burgermeister  in  reply  to  a  question  asking  if  it 


tm);-  s:  kassbdrger  family  53 

1  Strassburger,  of  Ober  Dieback,  was  united  in  mar- 
oi  February,  1715,  with  Maria  Elizabethan  widow  of  a 
'.:a\  of  this  place,  and  on  the  tith  of  February,  1738, 

■^^''nr'   '."■■■  ■•  •"  'his  place. 

JfhanH  UlHch  Stm.-sb%ir(-er  and 

'\l,  X'Qxn  JatfUary  19, 
A  KOLli, 
24,  1718. 

•^nbtt  13,  17HX 

^         -  8,  1721. 

\.      .    -it  12,  1723. 

mn  May  2o,  1734. 

■Bx  Jnm  4,  1727, 


■<  Smis^itt^i^r  and  Anna  Maria  Hebel: 

•rct^retlia  Stras%l:^r.^r,  born  January  30,  1739. 
ibetlm  Si.ramiJ-ger,  born  April  7,  1740 
|S  ' 

..;::.  r.' 4 c   ^;  <^^|-.BITRGER,  eldest  sob   of 

-  <rst;  wife,  Maria  Elizabeiha 

Ober  l?:i;.;v;--i|;iB  in  the  TmiSjicc  of  Hesse, 

:ui.y,  January  19,  1716, 

itial  stone  bi.uldiiig  two 

dd  the  clber  branch  of 


vama  occurred 
;:s  and  the  like 
etting  forth  the 
»us  liberty,  and 


rated  to  Pean- 
tain  Curl  Wolf 
iiid  after  some 
arger  who  was 
.:Ui-a,  of  whom  one  son 
',.  Dotterer:  ManuiJcripts 


&2 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  53 

Johann  Ulrich  Strassburger,  of  Ober  Dieback,  was  united  in  mar- 
riage on  the  26th  of  February,  1715,  with  Maria  Elizabetha,  widow  of  a 
certain  Peter  Fliicken,  of  this  place,  and  on  the  11th  of  February,  1738, 
with  Anna  Maria  Hebel,  also  of  this  place. 

Children  of  Johann  Ulrich  Strassburger  and 
Maria  Elisabetha  Fliicken: 

1.  JOHANN  ANDREAS  STRASSBURGER,  born  January  19, 

1716,  married  CATHERINA  ROSINA  KOLB. 

2.  Charlotte  Pauline  Strassburger,  born  April  24,  1718. 

3.  Johann  Strassburger,  born  November  13,  1719. 

4.  Maria  Barbara  Strassburger,  born  June  8,  1721. 

5.  Maria  Phillipina  Strassburger,  born  June  12,  1723. 

6.  Johann  Valentin  Strassburger,  born  May  26,  1724. 

7.  Maria  Rosina  Strassburger,  born  June  4,  1727, 

8.  Pauline  Strassburger,  born  June  22,  1737. 

Children  of  Johann  Ulrich  Strassburger  and  Anna  Maria  Hebel: 

9.  Charlotte  Margaretha  Strassburger,  born  January  30,  1739. 
10.     Anna  Maria  Elizabetha  Strassburger,  born  April  7,  1740. 

JOHANN  ANDREAS  STRASSBURGER,  eldest  son  of 
Johann  Ulrich  Strassburger,  and  his  first  wife,  Maria  Elizabetha 
(Fliicken),  was  born  in  Ober  Ingelheim  in  the  Province  of  Hesse, 
in  the  Bavarian  Pfalz,  or  Palatinate,  Germany,  January  19,  1716. 
The  house  in  which  he  was  born,  a  substantial  stone  building  two 
and  a  half  stories  high,  is  still  standing,  and  the  other  branch  of 
the  family  is  still  residing  in  that  town. 

The  greatest  exodus  of  Palatines  to  Pennsylvania  occurred 
about  the  year  1740.  Numerous  pamphlets,  letters  and  the  like 
were  distributed  freely  throughout  South  Germany,  setting  forth  the 
advantages  to  be  derived  from  the  civil  and  religious  liberty,  and 


was  known  in  his  family  that  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger  had  emigrated  to  Penn- 
sylvania replied:  "I  often  heard  my  father  tell  us  children  that  a  certain  Carl  Wolf 
from  here  (whom  I  knew  personally)  travelled  to  North  America  and  after  some 
years  returned,  that  he  had  met  in  Philadelphia  a  man  named  Strassburger  who  was 
a  native  here  and  a  kinsman  of  his.  The  same  had  two  children,  of  whom  one  son 
was  a  minister.  The  father  owned  a  large  farm."  Henry  S.  Dotterer :  Manuscripts 
in  possession  of  the  Genealogical  Society  of  Pennsylvania. 


54  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

privileges  for  Protestants,  to  be  enjoyed  in  Penn's  Colony  over  the 
sea.  Being  young,  unmarried  and  no  doubt  of  an  adventurous 
spirit,  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger,  in  the  late  summer  of  1742, 
set  sail  from  Rotterdam,  in  the  ship  Loyal  Judith,  James  Cowie, 
Captain.  The  vessel  reached  Philadelphia  about  September  1 ,  for 
on  the  third  of  the  month  he  with  the  other  passengers  subscribed 
to  the  oath  of  qualification,  signing  his  own  name 


Upon  the  list  made  out  by  the  Captain  of  the  vessel,  the  entry  reads 
Andrews  Strasburger,  aged  25.'  As  a  matter  of  fact  he  was  over 
twenty-six  and  a  half  years  old,  but  the  ages  of  passengers,  as  given 
by  the  masters,  were  more  or  less  approximate. 

It  does  not  appear  that  he  came  to  America  with  the  view  of 
settling  permanently,  as  we  find  no  further  record  of  him  in  this 
country  until  twenty-five  years  later.  His  name  is  not  found  among 
those  who  took  the  oath  of  naturalization  as  passed  by  Parliament 
in  1740,  which  required  all  those  foreigners  who  had  resided  in  the 
colony  or  colonies  upwards  of  seven  years  to  appear  before  the  Pro- 
vincial Court  at  Philadelphia,  and  upon  producing  a  certificate  of 
having  taken  the  Sacrament  or  Lord's  Supper  in  some  Protestant 
or  Reformed  Church  in  the  Province,  took  the  oath  and  repeated  the 
declaration  which  entitled  them  to  the  benefits  of  natural  born  sub- 
jects of  Great  Britain.  This  practice  was  continued  from  1740 
to  1773.' 

There  is  every  evidence  to  show  that  Johann  Andreas  Strass- 
burger made  but  a  short  stay  in  the  colony,  returning  to  Ober  Ingel- 
heim,  where  he  continued  to  reside  and  where,  in  1751,  at  the  age  of 
thirty-five  years,  he  was  married  to  Catherina  Rosina  Kolb.  Two 
children  were  born  to  them :  Christine  Strassburger,  born  October 
2,  1751,  and  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger,  born  January  24, 
1754.^ 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Volume  XVII,  pp.  228,  229. 
-  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Volume  II,  pp.  344-347. 
3  Kirchenbuch,  Ober  Ingelheim,  Germany. 


54  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

privileges  for  Protestants,  to  be  enjoyed  in  Penn's  Colony  over  the 
sea.  Being  young,  unmarried  and  no  doubt  of  an  adventurous 
spirit,  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger,  in  the  late  summer  of  1742, 
set  sail  from  Rotterdam,  in  the  ship  Loyal  Judith,  James  Cowie, 
Captain.  The  vessel  reached  Philadelphia  about  September  1,  for 
on  the  third  of  the  month  he  with  the  other  passengers  subscribed 
to  the  oath  of  qualification,  signing  his  own  name 


Upon  the  list  made  out  by  the  Captain  of  the  vessel,  the  entry  reads 
Andrews  Strasburger,  aged  25.'  As  a  matter  of  fact  he  was  over 
twenty-six  and  a  half  years  old,  but  the  ages  of  passengers,  as  given 
by  the  masters,  were  more  or  less  approximate. 

It  does  not  appear  that  he  came  to  America  with  the  view  of 
settling  permanently,  as  we  find  no  further  record  of  him  in  this 
country  until  twenty-five  years  later.  His  name  is  not  found  among 
those  who  took  the  oath  of  naturalization  as  passed  by  Parliament 
in  1740,  which  required  all  those  foreigners  who  had  resided  in  the 
colony  or  colonies  upwards  of  seven  years  to  appear  before  the  Pro- 
vincial Court  at  Philadelphia,  and  upon  producing  a  certificate  of 
having  taken  the  Sacrament  or  Lord's  Supper  in  some  Protestant 
or  Reformed  Church  in  the  Province,  took  the  oath  and  repeated  the 
declaration  which  entitled  them  to  the  benefits  of  natural  born  sub- 
jects of  Great  Britain.  This  practice  was  continued  from  1740 
to  1773.' 

There  is  every  evidence  to  show  that  Johann  Andreas  Strass- 
burger made  but  a  short  stay  in  the  colony,  returning  to  Ober  Ingel- 
heim,  where  he  continued  to  reside  and  where,  in  1751,  at  the  age  of 
thirty-five  years,  he  was  married  to  Catherina  Rosina  Kolb.  Two 
children  were  born  to  them:  Christine  Strassburger,  born  October 
2,  1751,  and  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger,  born  January  24, 
1754.' 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Volume  XVII,  pp.  228,  229. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Volume  II,  pp.  344-347. 

3  Kirchenbuch,  Ober  Ingelheim,  Germany. 


i 


•  4   ^\s; 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  55 

This  marriage  does  not  seem  to  have  been  a  very  congenial 
one,  or  else  having  decided  to  return  to  America,  he  failed  to  win 
consent  of  his  wife  to  accompany  him,  as  we  find  him  in  the  fall  of 
1769  again  setting  sail  from  Rotterdam  in  the  good  ship  Min- 
erva,^ Captain  Thomas  Arnott  in  command,  bringing  with  him 
his  two  children,  Christine,  now  a  young  woman  of  eighteen,  and 
Johann  Andreas,  a  lad  of  fifteen  years. 

The  Minerva  landed  at  Philadelphia  in  October,  where  on 
the  13th,  he,  with  the  other  male  passengers,  subscribed  to  the 
Declaration  and  again  he  signed  his  name  to  the  document  in  a 


QcrA^      <^LS^-^/3^v^<:> 


handwriting  that  did  not  vary  from  that  he  had  put  to  a  like  instru- 
ment twenty-five  years  before.^ 

Very  little  is  on  record  concerning  Johann  Andreas  Strass- 
burger  after  he  arrived  in  Pennsylvania  the  second  time.  For  a 
year  or  two  he  seems  to  have  resided  in  or  near  Philadelphia,  though 
the  tradition  is  he  settled  permanently  in  Hilltown  Township,  Bucks 
County.  In  1770,  we  find  him  as  a  communicant  of  the  First  Re- 
formed Church  in  Philadelphia.  On  the  original  record  his  name 
appears  abbreviated  thus:  "Joh:  Andr:  Strasburger.'" 

On  January  1,  1777,  his  daughter,  Christine,  was  married  by 
the  Reverend  Caspar  Weyberg,  pastor  of  this  church,  to  Alexander 
Smith,  an  Englishman,  who  resided  in  Philadelphia.  And  on 
November  29,  1803,  Elizabeth,  the  daughter  of  Andrew  and  grand- 
daughter of  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger,  was  married,  by  Rev- 
erend Samuel  Helffenstein,  to  Christian  Berger. 

Altho  we  find  "Andreas  Strasburger,"  Jr.,  listed  among  the 
married  communicants  of  the  church,  at  this  date  he  was  living 
near  Allentown,  Lehigh  County,  Pennsylvania. 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Volume   XVII,  p.  490. 

2  From  Original  Papers  in  possession  of  Department  of  Public  Records,  Harris- 
burg,  Pennsylvania. 

3  Records  First  Reformed  Church,   Philadelphia,   Pennsylvania. 


56  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

The  entries  thus  referred  to  read : 

1770.     Joh.  Anclr.  Strasburger  (Communicant). 

1817.     Andreas  Strasburger   (Married). 

1777.     Jan.  1,  Alex.  Smith  and  Christin:  Strasburger,  by 

Rev.  Caspar  Weyberg. 
1803.     Nov.  29,  Christian  Berger  and  Elisab.  Strasburger,  by 

Rev.  Samuel  Helffenstein. 

Very  little  is  known  of  Christine  Strassburger  and  her  hus- 
band, Alexander  Smith.  He  owned  during  the  Revolutionary  War, 
and  probably  lived  in,  a  house  on  Third  Street,  but  having  espoused 
the  cause  of  Great  Britain,  Alexander  Smith,  on  October  13,  1778, 
was  attainted  of  high  treason,^  and  being  convicted,  in  pursuance 
of  the  treason  laws  then  in  force,  his  house  was  confiscated.  After 
the  death  of  Alexander  and  Christine  Smith,  in  1794,  an  unsuc- 
cessful effort  was  made  to  recover  this  property.  In  September, 
1791,  Christine  and  her  children  went  to  live  with  her  brother, 
Andrew  Strassburger,  who  was  then  residing  on  his  farm  in  Upper 
Milford  Township,  then  Northampton,  but  now  Lehigh  County, 
forty-eight  miles  from  Philadelphia.  Here  they  remained  until 
June,  1792,  when  they  returned  to  Philadelphia,  having  made  the 
trip  both  ways  in  a  wagon. 

Alexander  Smith  died  about  November,  1793,  as  shown  by 
the  following: 

Letters  of  Administration  dated  7th  Dec.  1793  on  the  estate  of  Alex- 
ander Smith  late  of  Philadelphia  deceased,  were  granted  to  "Andrew 
Strasburg,"  of  Northampton  County,  Pa.,  Farmer.  Godfrey  Haga,  of 
Philadelphia,  Merchant,  and  John  Jordan,  Philadelphia,  Merchant, 
Sureties.- 

The  estate  was  valued  at  £500  and  an  inventory  and  account 
was  to  be  rendered  to  the  Court  before  January  17  following. 
Before  anything  was  done  towards  the  settling  of  the  estate,  the 
widow,  Christine,  died,  so  that  when  the  inventory  was  finally 
returned  to  the  Court,  September  10,  1794,  it  included  the  personal 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Fourth  Series,  Volume  III,  pp.  699,  944. 

2  Administration  Book  H,  p.  151.     Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  .57 

effects  of  both  Alexander  Smith  and  his  wife.    The  j&nal  account 
was  not  rendered  until  May  24,  1803. 

As  most  of  the  foregoing  information  concerning  this  family 
was  found  in  the  original  papers  bearing  on  this  estate,  which  are 
on  file  in  the  office  of  the  Register  of  Wills,  Philadelphia,  a  copy 
of  the  inventory  and  account  is  here  given  in  full.^ 

Inventory  of  Alex''  Smith's  Estate,  1794 

Inventory  taken  this  lO'*"  Day  of  September  1794  of  the  Personal 
Estate  of  Alexander  Smith  and  Christina  wife  of  said  Alexander  both 
Dece<^  Viz — 

£     s.  d. 

to    Cash 50—  0—0 

to    9j^  yrds  of  Calico  at  2/6  pr  yard 1 —  3 — 9 

to     an  old  Suet  of  Cortens 0 —  7 — 6 

to    a  bead  spread 1 — 10 — 0 

to    6  old  Shifts 0—  5—0 

to     5  shortcounds 1 — 10 — 0 

to     12  hanekichfrs  0—15-0 

to    2  aprans  &  three  Caps 0 — 12 — 0 

to     Black  Cloak 0—  7-0 

to    6  old  Counds  one  pare  of  Steas 1 — 10 — 0 

to     a  nombrella    A — 10 — 0 

to    a  Banbocks  &  2  Boneds — old 0 —  5 — 0 

to    a  Moff  &  Bocks 0—  7—6 

to    a  Coat  0—  7—6 

to     a  half  Doz  tea  spoons  &  old  barkels 1 — 10 — 0 

to     3  puter  spoons 0 —  1 — 6 

to     2  tea  Canesters  &  Cofife  pot  Candestick  &c 0 —  5 — 0 

to     a  lot  of  Cookery  wher 0 —  5 — 0 

to     a  lukenglass  0 —  3 — 9 

to    2  iron  pots  &  2  flat  iron 0 — 10 — 0 

to    a  tranch    0 — 10 — 0 


£68—  5—6 
Appraised  by  us  the  Subscribers  the  day  and  year  aforesaid. 

Henry  Hooken 
Peter  Linn 


1  Original  Papers  No.  268,  Register  of  Wills,  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


58 


THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


Northampton  County  ss 

On  the  10th  Day  of  September  Ann  D""  1794,  Before  me  the  Sub- 
scriber one  of  the  Justices  o.f  the  Peace  in  &  for  sd  Co.  Northampton  came 
the  above  named  Henry  Hooken  and  upon  his  solemn  Affirmation,  Doth 
Depose  &  say  that  he  together  with  the  said  Peter  Linn  did  Estimate  & 
appraize  the  Articles  Contained  in  the  above  Inventory  to  the  best  of 
their  Knowledge  &  ability,  Witness  my  Hand  &  Seal  on  the  Day  &  year 

aforesaid.  t  ^ 

James  Gile 

D^    The  account  of  Andrew  Strassburger  Adm'  &c  of  Alexander  Smith 
dec'^.  Cr. 

The  said  accomptant  charges  himself  with  all  and  singular  the  Goods  & 
Chatties  of  the  s'^  dec'^  as  per  Inventory  &  appraisement  thereof  filed  in 

the  Registers  Office  at  Philad=*  Amounting  to £68.  5.  6. 

Balance  due  the  Adm*" 4.12. 


£72.17.  6 


The  said  Accomptant  craves  Allowance  as  follows  to  wit — 


1793  For  this  sum  due  the  Accomptant  for  Board- 
ing and  Lodging  the  decedents  Wife  &  Chil- 
dren in  the  life  time  of  the  intestate  say  from 
9^^  September  1792  to  June  13'^  1793  is  39 
weeks  @  4  Dolls  per  week 


£58.  10 


For  this  Sum  p"^  for  Waggon  Hire  to  take  the 
decedents  Wife  &  Children  to  the  Accomptants 
House  at  the  distance  of  48  miles  &  back 
again,  all  which  in  the  lifetime  of  the  intestate 


4.  10 


Oct.  10         P<^  Godfrey  Haga  for  money  lent  the  intestate 
in  his  life  time   


1.    2.  6 


Dec  17         P<i  for  Letters  of  Adm" 

P'^  for  Advice  &  drawing  Petition  to  the  said 
Legislature  praying  for  restoration  of  House 
and  Lot  in  3^'^  S*  which  had  been  confiscated 
but  the  prayer  of  which  was  not  granted. . .  . 


18.  9 


2.     5. 


1803 


P'^  for  filing  Inventory. 


2.  6 


Protestant  Evangelical  Church.  Oher  Ingelheim. 


<«??-      ■    &'^r  X^  .' 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  59 


May  24  P*^  Register  for  examining  &  passing  this 
Account  with  Copy  Seal  &  Certificate  Allow- 
ance to  the  Adm''  for  his  Care  &  Trouble  in 
the  Adm'"   


4.  10 


£72.  17.  6 
The  above  named  Adm""  on  his  Solemn  Affirmation  doth  declare  &  say 
that  the  above  Account  as  it  stands  stated  &  settled  both  as  to  the  charge 
&  discharge  thereof  is  Just  and  true  to  the  best  of  his  knowledge  &  belief. 
Affd  the  24'^  day  of  May  1803 
Before 

I  Wampole     Dep  Reg. 


^^^nMi/'/^'^^^^^^ 


So  far  we  have  record  of  but  two  children  of  Alexander  and 
Christine  Strassburger  Smith.  The  eldest  was  Emma,  who  mar- 
ried Samuel  Krause,  a  merchant  of  Philadelphia,  who  had  business 
interests  in  South  America.  In  1877  they  were  living  on  Sixth 
Street,  above  Poplar,  and  both  are  buried  in  Union  Cemetery,  at 
532  Washington  Avenue;  and  Addie  Smith,  of  whom  nothing  is 
known.  ^ 

Johann  Andreas  Strassburger  was  a  school  teacher,  and  shortly 
after  his  arrival  in  this  country  some  of  the  leading  people  of 
Central  Hilltown,  Bucks  County,  secured  his  services  as  a  teacher, 
and  immediately  set  to  work  to  build  a  schoolhouse  for  his  own 
especial  use.^  He  died,  however,  suddenly  and  unexpectedly.  The 
building  was  completed  and  took  the  name  of  Seiples  Schoolhouse. 
It  was  built  of  logs  and  had,  in  addition  to  the  schoolroom,  apart- 
ments for  the  residence  of  the  teacher.  The  location  was  a  little 
to  the  north  of  what  was  Yost's  Mill  on  the  old  Bethlehem  Road 


1  (The  Dotterer  Papers.  Volume  XIV,  pp.  361,  ^(^1),  364.  Mss.  Collection  in 
possession  of  the  Genealogical  Society  of  Pennsylvania.) 

2  This  account  concerning  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger  and  the  building  of  the 
schoolhouse  was  handed  down  to  her  great-grandchildren  by  Mrs.  Kern,  the  mother 
of  Elizabeth  Kern  Stout,  who  was  the  grandmother  of  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger. 
Mrs.  Kern  died  in  1841  at  an  advanced  age.  "The  Central  News,"  Perkasie,  Bucks 
County,  Pa.,  Thursday,  May  27,  1886. 


60  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

not  far  from  the  present  village  of  Blooming  Glen.  Among  the 
many  who  taught  here  was  Gideon  S.  Strassburger,  a  great-grand- 
son of  the  man  for  whose  especial  benefit  it  was  originally  designed. 
The  building  was  torn  down  about  the  close  of  the  Civil  War, 
after  having  stood  nearly  one  hundred  years. 

It  is  not  known  when  nor  where  Johann  Andreas  Strass- 
burger died.  He  left  no  will  nor  were  any  letters  of  administration 
issued  upon  any  estate  he  may  have  acquired;  no  deeds  are  on 
record,  nor  does  his  name  appear  upon  the  tax  lists  of  the  Province 
between  1769  and  1785,  nor  do  we  find  him  listed  as  a  householder 
in  the  census  of  1790,  all  of  which  would  seem  to  prove  that  his 
death  occurred  shortly  after  his  coming  to  this  country.  While 
it  is  said  that  he  was  buried  in  the  graveyard  of  old  Tohickon 
Church  in  Rockhill  Township,  Bucks  County,  there  is  no  record 
of  his  death  appearing  upon  the  church  books,  nor  is  there  any 
gravestone  marking  his  last  resting  place.  Catherina  Rosina  Kolb, 
his  wife,  died  at  Ober  Ingelheim,  Germany,  March  15,  1771.^ 

Children  of  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger  and  Catherina  Rosina  Kolb: 

1.  Christine  Strassburger,  born  October  2,  1751,  at  Ober  Ingelheim, 

Germany;  died  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  1793-94;  married  Janu- 
ary 1,  1777,  Alexander  Smith,  of  Philadelphia,  who  died  in 
1793. 

2.  JOHANN  ANDREAS  STRASSBURGER,  born  January  24, 

1754,  at  Ober  Ingelheim,  Germany;  died  April  25,  1825, 
Upper  Mil  ford  Township,  Lehigh  County,  Pa. ;  married 
EVA  YEAGER,  of  Easton,  Pa. 

JOHANN  ANDREAS  STRASSBURGER,  only  son  of 
Johann  Andreas  Strassburger  and  his  wife,  Catherina  Rosina  Kolb, 
was  born  in  Ober  Ingelheim,  Germany,  January  24,  1754.  In 
1769,  when  fifteen  years  of  age,  he  accompanied  his  father  and 
only  sister,  Christine,  to  Pennsylvania.  It  is  not  known  where 
they  resided  during  the  lifetime  of  the  father,  but  it  was  either  in 
Philadelphia  or  Hilltown  Township,  Bucks  County. 


1  Kirchenbuch,  Ober  Ingelheim,  Germany. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  61 

After  the  death  of  his  father,  young  Strassburger  was  appren- 
ticed to  a  tanner,  but  where  and  under  whom  he  learned  this  trade 
is  unknown.    Owing  to  the  many  and  peculiar  forms  under  which 
this  name  appears  upon  the  public  records,  it  has  been  very  diffi- 
cult to  locate  data  concerning  either  the  father  or  the  son  for  some 
years  after  the  arrival  of  the  family  in  the  Colony.     So  far  we 
have  been  unable  to  find  any  references  to  Johann  Andreas  Strass- 
burger, Junior,  upon  any  records  to  which  we  have  had  access, 
prior  to  1781.     In  the  last-named  year  we  find  "And'w  Stros- 
berger"  listed  as  a  "single"  man,  in  Springfield  Township,  Bucks 
County,  Pa.^     Springfield  is  in  the  extreme  northwest  part  of  the 
county,  adjoining  both  Northampton  and  Lehigh.     In  the  same 
year  he  was  married"  at  Easton,  Northampton  County,  by  Rev. 
Frederick  Ernst,  pastor  of  the  Lutheran  Church  of  that  place,  to 
Eva  Jager,  or  Yeager,  daughter  of  John  Yeager  and  his  wife,  Eva 
Elizabeth  Schneider,  who  were  early  settlers  of  "the  Forks,"  as 
Easton  was  called  in  the  early  days.     The  entry  in  the  church 
book  reads:  "1781,  Oct.  9,  Andreas  Strasburger  and  Eva  Jagerin."^ 
She  was  born  in  what  is  now  Montgomery  County,  Pennsylvania, 
November  24,  1754,  and  died  in  Allentown,  Pennsylvania,  July 
16,  1835. 

Johann  Andreas  Strassburger,  or  Andrew  Strassburger,  as  he 
was  thereafter  known,  and  his  wife,  Eva,  resided  in  Springfield 
Township,  Bucks  County,  where  he  acquired  several  tracts  of 
land,  one  of  which  he  still  held  at  the  time  of  his  death.  He  also 
owned  at  one  time  a  farm  in  Haycock  Township,  same  county. 
The  Bucks  County  tax  transcripts  for  1782  record:  "And'w  Stras- 
berry,  Springfield  Township,  tan  yard,  eight  acres  of  land,  one 
horse,  and  one  cow;"*  in  1783,  as  "And'w  Strosberger"  he  paid  a 
state  tax  of  ten  shillings;^  the  following  year  we  find  "And'w  Shas- 
berger,"  tanner,  paying  taxes  on  eight  acres,  one  horse  and  two 
cows;**  in  1787  we  still  find  "And'w  Strasberry  "  in  Springfield 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XIII,  p.  171. 

2  Records  of  Williams  Township  and  Easton  Reformed  and  Lutheran  Churches, 
Pennsylvania  German  Magazine,  Volumes  18-20. 

3  The  German  termination  in,  added  to  a  proper  name,  denotes  the  feminine. 
*  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XIII,  p.  271. 

■5  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XIII,  p.  398. 

6  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XIII,  pp.  603,  700. 


62  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Township  paying  taxes  amounting  to  three  shillings  and  eight 
pence/  The  following  year,  1788,  he  appears  on  the  assessment 
lists  of  Moore  Township,  Northampton  County,  as  owner  of  a 
sawmill  and  fifty-two  acres  of  land,  upon  which  he  paid  a  tax  of 
seven  shillings  and  six  pence.' 

This  last  is  evidently  the  year  in  which  he  removed  to  Upper 
Milford  Township,  Northampton  County,  for  we  find  a  deed  on 
record  at  Easton,  dated  May  23,  1789,  which  recites  that  Andreas 
Strassburger,  "late  of  Springfield  Township,  Bucks  County,  tan- 
ner," purchased  two  tracts  of  land  in  Upper  Milford  Township, 
then  a  part  of  Northampton  County,  containing  in  all  two  hundred 
and  twenty-eight  acres/ 

Deed:  Peter  Shuler  to  Andrew  Strassburger,  1789 

^lii^  KnD0ntllt0  made  the  twenty  third  day  of  May  in  the  year 
of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  eighty  nine  Between  Peter 
Shuler  of  Upper  Milford  Township,  Northampton  County  and  State  of 
Pennsylvania,  yeoman,  and  Mary  Catherine  his  wife  of  the  one  part  and 
Andreas  Strassburger  late  of  Springfield  Township,  County  of  Bucks 
and  state  aforesaid,  Tanner,  of  the  other  part.  WHEREAS  the  Honor- 
able the  Proprietaries  o.f  the  then  Province  of  Pennsylvania  in  and  by 
their  patent  or  grant  dated  October  1,  1760,  did  grant  and  confirm  unto 
Adam  Shuler  (alias  Shouler)  two  tracts  of  land  situate  in  the  Township 
of  Upper  Milford  before  mentioned  adjoining  each  other  the  one  con- 
taining two  hundred  and  ten  acres  and  the  other  seventeen  acres  and 
thirty  four  perches  (Patent  Book  AA,  Vol.  2,  p.  76),  AND  WHEREAS 
the  said  Adam  Shuler  being  thus  lawfully  seized  of  and  in  the  said  two 
tracts  of  land  in  his  lifetime,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  died  Intestate 
leaving  a  Widow  and  thirteen  children  and  agreeable  to  the  prayer  of  the 
above  named  Peter  Shuler  eldest  son  and  heir  at  law  of  the  said  Adam 
Shuler  deceased  A  Writ  of  Partition  or  Valuation  was  issued  by  an 
Orphans'  Court  held  at  Easton  March  24,  1785,  WHEREAS  a  valua- 
tion of  the  above  tract  of  land  the  real  estate  of  the  said  Adam  Shouler 
deceased  was  made  according  at  law.  *  *  *  And  the  above  Peter  Shuler 
being  then  and  there  present  declared  himself  ready  and  willing  to  accept 
the  said  land  and  premises    *  *  *    at  said  valuation    *  *  *    and  the  said 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XIII,   p.   809. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XIX,  p.  353. 

3  Deed  Book  F,  No.    1,  p.  595.     Easton,   Pennsylvania. 


Bushkill  Street  Bridge,  Easton,  Pa..  al)out  1840. 


Easton,  Pa.,  about  1840. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  63 

land  and  premises  with  appurtenances  was  confirmed  unto  the  said  Peter 
Shuler  *  *  *  NOW  THIS  INDENTURE  WITNESSETH  that  the 
said  Peter  Schuler  and  Mary  Catherine  his  wife  for  and  in  consideration 
of  the  sum  of  nine  hundred  pounds  in  gold  and  silver  to  them  in  hand 
paid  by  the  said  Andreas  Strassburger  *  *  *  DO  grant,  bargain,  sell, 
enfoefif,  release  and  confirm  unto  the  said  Andreas  Strassburger  All 
that  above  recited  tract  of  land  lying  and  being  in  the  township  of  Upper 
Milford  aforesaid  adjoining  lands  of  John  Johnson,  Michael  Smith  and 
George  Ohldwine  *  *  *  Together  with  all  and  singular  the  Buildings, 
Edifices,  Ways,  Woods,  Water,  Water-courses,  Meadows,  fields.  Improve- 
ments, Rights,  Liberties,  Priviledges,  Hereditaments,  Members  and 
Appurtenances  whatsoever,  unto  the  two  described  tracts  of  land  *  *  * 
and  all  the  Estate,  Right,  Title,  Interest,  Claim  and  demand  of  them  the 
said  Peter  Shouler  and  Mary  Catherine  his  wife  of  in  and  to  the  same  (a 
burying  place  only  excepted  of  five  poles  square  in  the  place  now  Occupied 
for  the  same  which  the  said  Peter  Shuler  reserves  for  himself  and  his 
Heirs  forever)  *  *  *  j^  WITNESS  whereof  the  parties  to  these  pres- 
ents have  interchangeably  set  their  hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year 
first  above  written. 

Jacob  Shuler 

her 
Mary  Catherine    X    Shuler 
mark 

On  August  10  of  the  same  year,  1789,  he  purchased  of  Jo- 
hannes Dubler,  for  the  sum  of  thirty  pounds,  a  house  and  lot  in 
the  town  of  Easton,  described  in  the  town  plot  as  No.  154,  situated 
on  a  street  "going  from  the  Tavern  of  Jacob  Opp  to  the  Bushkill 
Creek,"  and  by  the  additional  payment  of  four  pounds  eighteen 
shillings  and  nine  pence  he  acquired  two  cows,  one  mare  and  a 
colt,  which  were  on  the  premises.' 

Deed:  Johannes  Dubler  to  Andrew  Strassburger,  1789 

TO  ALL  PEOPLE  to  whom  these  Presents  shall  Come  Johannes 
Dubler  of  Moor  Township  in  the  County  of  Northampton  and  State  of 
Pennsylvania  SENDETH  GREETING  KNOW  YE  that  the  said 
Johannes  Dubler  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  Thirty  pounds 
Specie  Now  Lawful  money  of  Pennsylvania  unto  him  in  hand  well  and 


1  Deed  Book  F,  No.  1,  pp.  568,  570.    Easton,  Pennsylvania. 


64  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

truly  paid  by  Andrew  Strassburger  of  Upper  Milford  Township  in  the 
county  aforesaid  tanner  *  *  *  Hath  granted,  bargained,  sold,  aliened 
and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  his  heirs  and  assigns 
A  certain  Lot  of  ground  and  Tenement  thereon  erected  situate  and  being 
in  the  Town  of  Easton  in  Northhampton  County  marked  in  the  plot  of 
said  town  No.  154  adjoining  lot  of  ground  now  occupied  by  Jacob  Wey- 
gand  on  the  north  and  on  the  south  by  the  lot  of  ground  now  occupied  by 
John  Tiegman  on  the  west  by  a  street  going  from  the  Tavern  of  Jacob 
Opp  to  the  Bushkill  Creek.  IN  WITNESS  whereof  the  said  Johannes 
Dubler  Hath  hereunto  set  his  hand  and  seal  this  tenth  day  of  August 
Anno  Dom.  one  thousand  Seven  hundred  and  eighty  nine. 

Johannes  Dubler. 

Agreement:  Johannes  Dubler  and  Andreas  Strassburger,  1789 

Johannes  Dubler,  in  consideration  of  four  pounds  eighteen  shilling 
and  nine  pence  paid  by  Andreas  Strassburger  of  Upper  Milford  Town- 
ship, Northampton  County,  Pennsylvania,  for  all  the  goods  and  chattels 
hereafter  particularly  mentioned  that  is  to  say  two  cows,  one  mare  and 
colt,  all  and  singular  which  said  Premises  are  now  remaining -standing 
and  being  now  on  the  Premises  at  Present  in  the  occupation  of  the  said 
Johannes  Dubler  of  Moor  Township.  In  Witness  whereof  I  have  here- 
unto Subscribed  my  name  and  seal  this  tenth  day  of  August,  1789. 

Johannes  Dubler, 

It  would  seem  from  an  examination  of  these  early  deeds  that 
Andrew  Strassburger  lived  part  of  the  time  on  his  farm  in  Upper 
Milford  and  part  in  his  house  at  Easton,  as  on  October  19  of  the 
same  year  John  Penn,  Junior,  and  John  Penn,  Senior,  late  Pro- 
prietaries of  the  Province,  granted  or  confirmed  to  Andrew  Strass- 
burger, "of  the  Town  of  Easton,"  all  former  Proprietary  right  to 
this  lot  of  gound,  which  is,  in  this  later  deed,  described  as  No.  154 
and  situated  on  the  east  side  of  Hamilton  Street  about  sixty  feet 
from  Bushkill  Street.^ 

Deed:  John  Penn,  Sr.,  &  John  Penn,  Jr.,  to  Andrew  Strassburger, 

1789 

tlL\ii$  KnDCntUtC  Made  the  nineteenth  day  of  October  in  the  year 
of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  eighty  nine.  Between  the 


1  Deed  Book  G,  No.  1,  p.  21.     Easton,  Pennsylvania. 


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THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  65 

Honorable  John  Penn  the  younger,  Esquire,  one  of  the  late  Proprietaries 
of  the  Province  of  Pennsylvania  *  *  *  by  Anthony  Butler  of  the  North- 
ern Liberties  of  the  City  of  Philadelphia  in  the  Commonwealth  of  Penn- 
sylvania, Gentleman,  his  Attorney  *  *  *  and  the  Honorable  John  Penn, 
the  Elder,  Esquire,  late  the  other  Proprietor  of  said  Province  of  Pennsyl- 
vania *  *  *  by  John  F.  Mifflin  o.f  the  City  of  Philadelphia,  Attorney  at 
law,  his  Attorney  *  *  *  of  the  one  part  and  Andrew  Strassburger  of 
the  Town  of  Easton  in  the  County  of  Northampton  in  Pennsylvania,  tan- 
ner, of  the  other  part.  WITNESSETH  that  the  said  John  Penn  the 
Younger  by  his  attorney  Anthony  Butler  and  the  said  John  Penn,  the 
Elder,  by  his  attorney  John  F.  Mifflin  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum 
of  Twenty  Five  Pounds  Current  Money  of  Pennsylvania  in  specie  unto 
them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  ****** 
DO  grant,  sell,  release,  and  confirm  unto  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger 
and  to  his  heirs  and  assigns  a  Certain  piece  of  land  Situate  in  the  said 
town  of  Easton  in  the  County  of  Northampton  aforesaid  on  the  East 
side  of  Hamilton  Street  at  a  distance  of  sixty  five  feet  from  Bushkill 
Street,  Containing  in  breadth  on  Hamilton  Street  sixty  feet  and  in  depth 
two  hundred  and  forty  feet  bounded  on  the  southward  by  lot  number  155, 
westward  by  Hamilton  Street  Northward  by  lot  Number  153,  and  east- 
ward by  an  Alley,  (It  being  the  same  lot  of  ground  which  is  marked  in 
the  General  Plan  of  said  Town  of  Easton  number  154.  IN  WITNESS 
whereof  the  said  Parties  to  these  presents  have  interchangeably  set  their 
hands  and  seals  hereunto  dated  the  day  and  year  first  above  written. 

Andrew  Strassburger 

John  Penn,  Jr 

By  his  Attorney  Anthony  Butler. 

John  Penn,  Sen'' 

By  his  attorney  John  F.  Mifflin. 

He  retained  possession  of  this  house  and  lot  until  September 
29,  1804,  when  he  and  his  wife,  Eva,  sold  it  to  Jacob  Mixell,  of 
Easton,  for  three  hundred  and  seventy-five  pounds/ 

As  before  stated,  we  find  him  on  the  assessment  lists  of  Moore 
Township,  as  the  owner  of  a  sawmill  and  fifty-two  acres  of  land. 
This  mill  with  a  house  and  three  small  tracts  of  land  he  purchased 
at  sheriff's  sale,  it  being  the  estate  of  Daniel  Junt,  deceased.  On 
September  9,   1789,  Andrew  Strassburger  sold  the  premises  to 


1  Deed  Book  A,   No.   3,   p.  4.     Easton,   Pennsylvania. 


66  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Frederick  Alderholt,  of  New  Britain  Township,  Bucks  County, 
who  died  intestate;  so,  in  order  to  secure  to  Daniel  Alderholt,  son 
of  Frederick,  full  and  complete  title  to  this  property,  Andrew 
Strassburger  and  his  w^fe,  Eva,  on  May  25,  1792,  signed  the  fol- 
lowing deed:^ 

Deed:  Andrew  Strassburger  to  Daniel  Alderholt,  1792 

Cf)I0  3n Denture  Made  the  twenty  fifth  day  of  May  in  the  year 
of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety  two  Between  Andrew 
Strassburger  of  Upper  Milford  Township  in  the  County  of  Northampton, 
Tanner,  and  Eva  his  wife  of  the  one  part  and  Daniel  Aderholt  of  New 
Brittain  Township  in  the  County  of  Bucks  in  the  State  of  Pennsylvania 
aforesaid  of  the  other  part.  WHEREAS  Frederick  Beck  then  of  Moore 
township,  county  of  Northampton,  miller  and  Margareth  his  wife  by  a 
certain  Indenture  dated  31st  day  of  March,  1784,  did  grant  and  convey 
unto  one  Daniel  Junt,  a  certain  Alessuage,  Tenement,  Grist  Mill  and  tract 
of  land  adjoining  lands  late  of  Casper  Erb  and  others,  containing  fifteen 
acres  and  one  hundred  and  thirty  perches.  And  also  by  a  Deed  Poll  of 
the  same  date  he  the  said  Frederick  Beck  did  grant  and  assign  unto  the 
said  Daniel  Junt  two  certain  other  tracts  or  pieces  of  Warranted  or 
Located  land  situated  in  Moore  township  aforesaid  one  of  them  adjoining 
land  now  or  late  of  Frederick  Shonberger  and  others,  containing  twenty 
four  acres  and  thirty  perches  and  the  other  containing  twelve  acres  and 
thirty  four  perches.  AND  WHEREAS  George  Graif,  Esquire,  late 
Sheriff  of  the  County  of  Northampton  by  virtue  of  a  writ  of  Vendition 
Exponar,  did  *  *  *  expose  the  same  for  sale  at  public  auction 
and  sold  the  said  above  recited  Messuage,  Grist  Mill  and  three  recited 
tracts  of  land  situated  in  Moore  township  aforesaid  to  the  said 
Andrew  Strassburger  *  *  *  AND  WHEREAS  by  certain  articles 
of  agreement  in  writing  duly  executed  and  dated  the  9th  day  of 
September,  1789,  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  for  certain  considerations 
therein  mentioned  did  grant  and  sell  unto  Frederick  Alderholt  aforesaid, 
all  the  aforesaid  Messuage,  Tenement  and  Grist  Mill  and  Tract  of  Land 
*  *  *  And  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  in  the  said  writing  further 
agreed  to  give  the  Rights  to  all  the  said  Lands  to  the  said  Frederick 
Aderholt  in  fee  simple,  he  having  patented  such  parts  thereof  as  were 
yet  unpatented.  AND  WHEREAS  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  after 
executing  the  said  agreement  did  actually  become  vested  in  the  said  two 


1  Deed  Book  No.  2,  p.  402.     Easton,  Pennsylvania, 


Saucer     belongin.cr     to     Rev. 
John     Andrew    Strassburger. 


Lafayette  Dish,  1824,  belong- 
ing to  Rev.  John  Andrew 
Strassburger. 


Cream      Jug      belonging      to 

Rev.    John    Andrew 

Strassburger. 


Cup  belonging  to   Rev.  John 
Andrew    Strassburger. 


Strawberry     Bowl     used     by 
Rev.   John   Andrew   Strass- 
burger for  baptismal 
purposes. 


6 

Cup    (Rose    Colonial)    belong- 
ing to   Rev.  John  Andrew 
Strassburger. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  67 

then  unpatented  Tracts  of  Land  as  of  fee  simple,  vizt:  by  Indenture  of 
Michael  Swarz  and  Veronica  his  wife  dated  August  2,  1790,  for  the 
aforesaid  twenty  four  acres  and  thirty  perches  *  *  *  and  by  Indenture 
of  George  Palmer,  dated  October  1,  1790,  for  the  aforesaid  twelve  acres 
and  thirty  four  perches.  AND  WHEREAS  the  said  Frederick  Alder- 
holt  since  and  before  the  actual  accomplishment  of  the  said  agreement 
died  Intestate  and  the  Honorable  the  Judge  of  the  Orphans'  Court  in 
and  .for  the  County  of  Northampton  did  order  and  award  all  the  said 
premises  as  described  (as  estate  of  Frederick  Alderholt,  deceased)  unto 
the  said  Daniel  Alderholt  *  *  *  NOW  THIS  INDENTURE  WIT- 
NESSETH that  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  sixty  pounds 
lawful  money  unto  them  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  and  Eva  his  wife 
to  them  in  hand  well  and  truly  paid  by  the  said  Daniel  Alderhold  and  for 
other  valuable  considerations  thereunto  moveing  them,  they  the  said 
Andrew  Strassburger  and  Eva  his  wife  have  given,  bargained,  sold,  re- 
leased and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Daniel  Alderholt  all  the  above  de- 
scribed Messuage,  Tenement  and  Grist  Mill  and  tract  of  land  situate, 
lying  and  being  in  Moore  township  aforesaid.  IN  WITNESS  whereof 
the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have  interchangeably  set  their  hands 
and  seals  the  day  and  year  first  above  written. 

Andreas  Strassburger 
her 

Eve    X    Strassburger 
mark 

The  first  census  of  the  United  States  was  taken  in  1790,  and 
among  those  residing  in  Upper  Milford,  Northampton  County,  Pa., 
we  find  the  name  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  whose  household  con- 
sisted of  himself,  a  son  over  sixteen  and  five  females.^ 

In  1812,  Lehigh  County  was  erected  out  of  the  western  part 
of  Northampton  County,  and  the  township  of  Upper  Milford  fell 
into  the  new  subdivision,  and  thereafter  Andrew  Strassburger  is 
designated  as  of  Upper  Milford,  Lehigh  County.  The  tax  returns 
for  Upper  Milford,  for  1812,  show  the  following  living  within  its 
precincts:  "Andrew  Straszberger,"  and  John  Strassburger,  his  son, 
who  was  then  unmarried ;  Henry,  John  and  Peter  Engleman,  Adam 
Wieder,  Sr.,  Adam  Wieder,  Jr.,  and  Casper  Wieder.^ 


1  Heads  of  Families  in  Pennsylvania,  1790,  p.   179. 

2  Charles  R.  Roberts,  History  of  Lehigh  County,  Pennsyhwiia,  Volume  I,  p.  775. 


68  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

In  February,  1817,  Andrew  Strassburger  purchased  six  con- 
tiguous tracts  of  land  in  East  Penn  Township,  Northampton 
County,  containing  in  all  nearly  three  hundred  acres,  for  which 
he  paid  seven  thousand  dollars/  His  last  purchase  was  made  in 
January,  1825,  when  he  bought  of  Jacob  Reeser  and  wife,  of 
Upper  Milford,  a  house  and  farm  in  Lower  Mt.  Bethel  Township, 
also  in  Northampton  County." 

Andrew  Strassburger  continued  to  buy  large  tracts  of  land, 
a  great  deal  of  which  lay  in  Bucks  County.  He  retained  most  of 
this  land  until  his  death.  Besides  acquiring  this  large  amount  of 
real  estate,  as  shown  by  the  above  records,  Andrew  Strassburger 
w^as  interested  in  several  public  ventures  in  Allentown,  the  capital 
city  of  Lehigh  County,  and  he  soon  became  a  man  of  affairs  and 
prominence,  and  was  rated  one  of  the  wealthiest  men  in  the  com- 
munity. He  was  a  member  of  the  first  Grand  Jury  called  to  serve 
after  the  organization  of  the  county.  The  jury  consisted  of  twenty- 
four  members  representing  the  different  townships,  and  Andrew 
Strassburger,  tanner,  was  one  of  four  chosen  from  Upper  Milford, 
one  of  the  others  being  John  Engleman,  farmer.^ 

He  was  also  a  director  and  large  stockholder  in  the  North- 
ampton Bank,  the  oldest  financial  institution  in  Lehigh  County. 
The  borough  of  Northampton  was  incorporated  into  a  city  March 
18,  1811,  the  name  being  later  changed  to  Allentown,  and  the 
Northampton  Bank  was  chartered  by  Act  of  Legislature,  July  11, 
1814.  Directors  were  elected  on  August  12,  and  the  following 
gentlemen  were  chosen:  Peter  Dorney,  Esq.,  John  Wagner,  Jacob 
Blumer,  William  Eckert,  Jacob  Stein,  George  Schaeffer,  Andreas 
Strassburger,  John  Krauss,  Peter  Rhoads,  Jr.,  Peter  Ruch,  Stephen 
Balliet,  Jr.,  Joseph  Frey,  Jr.,  and  George  Keck.  Peter  Rhoads 
was  elected  president  and  James  A.  Sinton  cashier.  The  bank 
began  business  almost  immediately  after  its  organization  with  a 
capital  of  $123,375.00.  The  building  in  which  it  opened  and,  for 
that  matter,  occupied  during  its  entire  existence,  was  a  small  two- 
story  stone  structure  which  stood  upon  the  site  of  the  present  Allen- 
town Bank.    The  affairs  of  the  Northampton  Bank  were  prosperous 


1  Deed  Book  C-4,  pp.  428-29.     Easton,  Pennsylvania. 

"  Deed  Book  B-5,  p.  128.     Easton,  Pennsylvania. 

3  Charles  R.  Roberts,  History  of  Lehigh  County,  Pennsylvania,  Volume  I,  p.  214. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  69 

and  uneventful  until  about  1843,  when  the  then  president,  through 
his  bad  management,  brought  about  his  failure/ 

At  the  time  of  his  death,  Andrew  Strassburger  had  stock  in 
the  Bank  of  North  America,  Bank  of  Pennsylvania,  Philadelphia 
Bank,  Easton  Bank  and  Reading  Bank. 

Andrew  Strassburger  died  April  27,  1825,  on  his  farm  in 
Upper  Milford  and  was  buried  in  the  graveyard  of  the  Reformed 
Church  at  Zionsville,  in  the  same  township,  of  which  congregation 
he  and  his  wife  were  no  doubt  communicants,  although  she  was 
born  and  reared  a  Lutheran.  Despite  the  fact  that  he  was  possessed 
of  so  much  real  estate,  bank  stock,  mortgages,  bonds,  etc.,  he 
neglected  to  make  a  will,  and  so  upon  his  death  his  estate,  valued 
at  over  $60,000,  was  carried  into  the  Orphans'  Court  and  settled 
by  the  intestate  laws  of  the  state. 

On  May  3,  1825,  six  days  after  his  death,  letters  of  adminis- 
tration were  issued  to  John  Strassburger,  eldest  son,  and  John 
Engleman,  son-in-law,  the  widow,  Eva  Strassburger,  renouncing, 
as  shown  by  the  following:^ 

Know  all  men  by  these  presents  that  I  Eva  Strassburger  of  Upper 
Milford  Township,  widow  and  Relict  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  yeoman, 
deceased,  have  renounced  released  and  quit  claimed  and  by  these  Pres- 
ents do  release  and  quitclaim  all  my  right  and  Title  to  the  said  adminis- 
tration of  the  goods  and  chattels  rights  and  credits  whatsoever  which 
were  o.f  the  said  deceased  and  desire  that  the  same  may  be  committed  to 
my  son  John  Strassburger  and  John  Engleman.  In  Witness  whereof  I 
have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and  seal  this  third  day  of  May,  1825. 

her 
Eva    X    Strassburger 
mark 

On  May  16,   1825,  Andrew  Engleman  and  Henry  Seibert 
made  an  appraisement  of  the  estate,  a  copy  of  which  follows : 

The  following  Bank  Stock  apreast 

2  shares  Bank  of  Pennsylvania $800.00 

"    North  America  800.00 

50     "          "       "    Easton    1500.00 


1  Charles  R.  Roberts,  History  of  Lehigh  County,  Pemusylvania,  Volume  I,  p.  425. 

2  Original  Papers  No.  1056,  Orphans'  Court,  Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


70  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

50  shares  Bank  of  Reting 1500.00 

403     "           "       "  Northampton    18135.00 

Dividends  in  same  Banks 544.05 

Deposits  in  Bank  of  Northampton 168.81 


$23447.86 

Book  Debts. 

Against  Caspar  Wieder 20.91 

Against  David  Dishler 12.00 

Adam  Wieder,  Jr 3.43 


$36.34 

Bonds  &  Notes  against  the  heirs.  Int 

Bond  against  Andrew  Strassburger $344.13  $800.00 

John  Engleman   880.00  1600.00 

Christian  Young   800.00            800.00 

246.80            266.67 

215.51            266.67 

135.51            266.67 

1.65              24.33>4 

1.2                18.44 

Ditto  he  charges  him  for  rent  of  farm 20.00 

John  Engleman,  charges  himself  for 4091.97^           29.19 


Note,  remains  a  balance  against  Adam 

Wieder,  Sr 629.87  629.87 

165.00 

Credit  said  note  .for  ballance 410.95  464.87 

Bond  Against  Adam  Wieder 773.50  1066.67 

Christian  Berger 169.64  169.64 

800.00  800.00 

337.39  368.67 


4491.48  2869.85 

Note  against  Richard  Weitzel 200.00 

200.00 

"       Abraham   Sibert    18.00 

"           "       Henry  Hunsberger   1320.00 

"       Abraham  Dieht    73.33 

"       73.33 

"       73.33 


Catharine  Strassburger  Young  Hartzell. 


.\\9Sltv»H  SW"o"f  tJStu«:i?.?.tit)i?^  9it*niM\tnO 


:-:-i(fj 


•  --^lAS, 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY 


71 


Lehigh  County  SS  Came  before  me  the  Subscriber  one  of  the  Jus- 
tices of  the  Peace  in  and  for  the  said  County  of  Lehigh,  the  above  said 
Andrew  Engleman  and  Henry  Seibert  and  took  their  oath  as  the  law 
directs  fare  the  foregoing  apreasment.  In  witness  whereof  I  have  here- 
unto set  my  hand  and  seal  this  sixteenth  day  of  May,  1825. 

LoHRENS  Stahler,  Esq. 


Personal  and  moveable  estate. 


Bonds  and  Notes. 

Judgment  against  Peter  Mussleman 

Peter  Beisel   

2  Bonds  with  judgment  against  Hecht  &  Ehret. 

Judgment  against  John  Hause 

"       Jacob   Schill    

John  Hause,  et  al 


149.38 

117.03 

14.25 

60.25 


$340.91 

$388.94 
1600.00 
597.06 
474.00 
300.00 
800.00 


3562.94 


John   Hause    

"  "        Jacob    Bintner    . . .  . 

"  "        Jacob  Shankenbank 

Bond  against  Mathias  Stein 

Peter  Young  

Christian  Young  Miller. 

Henry   Martz    

Jacob  Strettel    


John    Spinner    , 

Jacob   Krihlein    

John  Reisse  

John  Eruz  and  others, 


45.00 

133.33 

10.00 

1000.00 

3950.00 

3050.00 

950.00 

500.00 

398.53 

300.00 

407.43 

1200.00 

101.33 


12145.62 


John  Eruz  and  others 

Philip   Zeishall    

Leonard  N.  Nazel  &  Peter  Franz. 


101.33 

50.00 

250.00 

250.00 


72  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


P.nnrl    cio-ainct   T  pnmrrl    M     TSIn  7pl    and    Pctcr    FrSll^        

250.00 

u                 I,                       a                              a         a           <'              <' 

250.00 

1151.33 

Int. 

Bond  and  judgment  against  Daniel  Schwartz  .  .     1114.00 

93.95 

Peter  Train   .  . . 

1066.67 

76.44 

Geang  Train   .  . 

466.67 

29.00 

George  Garr   , . 

150.00 

13.29 

Caspar  Reuter  . 

172.00 

.43 

<(           (I 

172.00 

Jacob  Ruhlein  . 

25.00 

.83 

John   Zehring    . 

200.00 

11.80 

William  Bass    • 

200.00 

.63 

Joseph  Rue   .  . . 

200.00 

35.40 

Cornelius  Reinhall 

50.00 

3.30 

John  M.  Raulay  . 

25.00 

.35 

PhiHp  Deiy   

61.67 

.44 

Simon   Shaffer 

15.71 

1.10 

3923.86 


266.97 


A  year  later,  during  the  negotiations  pending  the  settlement, 
John  Strassburger  signed  a  bond  insuring  to  his  mother,  Eva,  her 
widow's  dower  rights/ 

Bond:  John  Strassburger  to  Eve  Strassburger,  1827 

KNOW  ALL  MEN  by  these  presents  That  I  John  Strassburger  son 
of  Andrew  Strassburger,  late  of  Upper  Milford  Township  in  the  County 
of  Lehigh,  deceased,  am  held  and  firmly  bound  unto  Eve  Strassburger, 
widow  and  relict  of  said  deceased,  in  the  sum  of  $205.20  to  be  paid  unto 
the  said  Eve  or  to  her  certain  attorney  executors,  administrators  or 
assigns,  To  which  payment  well  and  truly  to  be  made  I  do  bind  myself 
my  heirs,  executors,  administrators  firmly  by  these  presents.  Sealed  with 
my  seal  dated  the  second  day  o.f  February  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  1827. 

WHEREAS  such  proceedings  were  had  on  the  eighth  day  of  Decem- 
ber last  past  and  the  second  day  of  February  instant  in  the  Orphans' 


1  Original  Papers  No.  1056,  Orphans'  Court,  Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  73 

Court  of  the  said  County  of  Lehigh  respecting  the  real  estate  whereof 
the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  died  seized  intestate  that  the  inquisition 
awarded  by  the  said  Court  did  value  and  appraise  Portion  number  two 
and  the  said  John  accepted  the  same  at  the  sum  of  three  hundred  and 
forty  one  dollars  and  fifty  six  cents  lawful  money  aforesaid  and  the 
above  bounden  John  Strassburger  was  ordered  to  enter  into  bonds,  and 
recognize  for  the  payment  of  the  widow's  dower  and  of  the  shares  and 
dividends  of  the  other  children  of  the  said  intestate  of  and  in  the  valua- 
tion money  aforesaid ;  That  sealing  and  delivery  of  which  bonds  he,  the 
said  John  Strassburger,  shall  hold  and  enjoy  the  real  estate,  viz.  Por- 
tion number  two  thereof  as  aforesaid,  to  him,  his  heirs  and  assigns  for- 
ever according  to  law. 

NOW  THE  CONDITION  OF  THIS  OBLIGATION  IS  SUCH 
THAT  if  the  above  bounden  John  Strassburger  his  heirs,  executors  and 
administrators  do  and  shall  well  and  duly  pay,  or  cause  to  be  paid  unto 
the  above  Eve  Strassburger  or  to  her  certain  attorney,  executors  or 
administrators  or  assigns  the  just  and  full  sum  of  six  dollars  and  fifteen 
cents  and  a  half  lawful  money  aforesaid  on  the  second  day  of  February 
which  shall  be  in  the  year  of  our  Lord,  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and 
twenty  eight  and  the  like  sum  of  six  dollars  and  fifteen  cents  and  one 
half  yearly  and  every  year  during  her  natural  life,  she  being  the  widow 
of  the  said  deceased,  (the  said  sum  of  six  dollars  and  fifteen  cents  and 
one  half  being  the  Dower  of  her  the  said  Eve  Strassburger  of  and  in  the 
valuation  money  aforesaid)  without  fraud  or  further  delay,  then  the 
above  obligation  to  be  void  and  of  none  efifect,  otherwise  to  be  and  remain 
in  full  force  and  virtue.  x 

At  the  same  time  he  entered  into  a  bond  with  his  brother, 
John  Andrew  Strassburger,  and  with  each  of  the  other  heirs 
individually. 

Bond  John  Strassburger  to  John  Andrew  Strassburger.  .. .   34.20     17.10 

Catherine  Young   34.20     17.10 

Mary  Wieder  (full  sum  10.00)     6.84      3.42 

Eliza  Wieder 10.00 

Hannah   Berger    34.20     17.10 

Hannah  Egner   6.84      3.42 

Caroline  Wieder 

Mary  Fugleman  34.20     17.10 

Paul  Wieder  

Caroline  Wieder  


74  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Two  years  later  John  Strassburger  presented  to  the  Judges 
of  the  Orphans'  Court  of  Lehigh  County  a  petition  that  the  Court 
would  partition  the  real  estate,  lying  in  Lehigh  and  Northampton 
Counties,  among  the  heirs.  This  document  names  all  the  children 
and  grandchildren  of  Andrew  and  Eva  Strassburger. 

To  the  Honorable  the  Judges  of  the  Orphans'  Court  of  the  County 
of  Lehigh : 

The  Petition  of  John  Strassburger  one  of  the  sons  and  heirs  of 
Andrew  Strassburger  late  of  Upper  Milford  Township  in  said  County, 
yeoman,  Most  respectively  showeth 

That  in  the  Month  of  April  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand 
eight  hundred  and  twenty  five  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  died  intes- 
tate leaving  a  Widow  and  five  children,  to  wit :  John,  Andrew,  Catherine 
intermarried  with  Christian  Young,  Mary  intermarried  with  John  Engle- 
man,  Hannah  intermarried  with  Christian  Berger  and  your  said  Peti- 
tioner and  also  five  Grand  Children  (the  Children  of  Christina  a  Daughter 
of  the  said  deceased,  which  said  Christina  is  also  now  deceased,  but  was 
in  her  lifetime  intermarried  with  John  Adam  Wieder  and  died  leaving 
issue,  to  wit:  Catherine,  Saul,  Eliza  and  Hannah  intermarried  with 
Thomas  Egner,  all  of  which  said  Grand  Children  are  still  in  their  minor- 
ity. And  that  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  died  seized  in  his  demesne 
as  of  fee  of  and  in  three  tracts  of  Land  with  the  Buildings  and  appur- 
tenances situate  in  the  said  County  of  Lehigh,  to  wit:  One  Tract  situate 
in  the  aforesaid  Township  of  Upper  Milford  in  said  County  bounded  by 
lands  now  or  late  of  William  Brunner,  Abraham  Smith,  John  Weikel, 
Abraham  Shuler,  the  Heirs  of  John  Reisson,  Philip  Zeisluff  and  others 
containing  one  hundred  and  fifty-three  acres  and  one  hundred  perches. 
*  *  *  One  tract  situate  in  Macungie  Township  in  said  County  bounded 
by  lands  of  Peter  Haas,  John  Mare,  John  Shares  and  others  containing 
thirty-two  acres  *  *  *  and  one  other  Tract  being  a  Lot  of  ground  Sit- 
uate on  the  north  side  of  Lehigh  Street  in  the  Borough  of  Northampton 
in  said  County  adjoining  lot  No.  772  and  other  Lands  and  numbered  on 
the  plan  of  said  Borough  No.  771,  extending  in  length  one  hundred  feet 
in  width  one  hundred  feet. 

Your  Petitioner  therefore  prays  the  Court  to  award  an  inquest  to 
make  partition  of  the  aforesaid  Lands  *  *  *  to  and  among  the  children 
and  Representatives  of  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  in  such 
manner  and  in  such  proportions  as  by  the  laws  of  this  Commonwealth  is 
directed,  if  such  partition  can  be  made  without  prejudice  to  or  spoiling 


Copper    Tea    Kettle    from 
Parsonage. 


Corner   Cupboard   which   stood   in   the 
Parsonage  at   Perkasie,   Pa. 


Pewter   Plate   from    the    Kern- 
Stout  Homestead. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  75 

the  whole,  but  if  such  partition  cannot  be  made  a  aforesaid  then  to  value 
and  appraise  the  same.  And  further  to  inquire  and  ascertain  if  whether 
the  said  Real  Estate  will  conveniently  accommodate  more  than  one  of  the 
said  children  or  Representatives  and  if  so  how  many  of  them  it  will  con- 
veniently accommodate  and  make  report  of  their  proceedings  to  the  next 
general  Orphans'  Court. 

At  the  same  time  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  the  second  son, 
made  a  similar  petition  to  the  Orphans'  Court  at  Doylestown^ 
asking  that  partition  be  made  of  such  lands  as  lay  within  the 
bounds  of  Bucks  County,  as  he  had  been  appointed  administrator 
of  such  estate  as  lay  within  the  jurisdiction  of  that  Court. 

To  the  Honorable  John  Ross,  Esquire,  President,  and  his  Associate 
Judges  now  composing  an  Orphans'  Court  in  and  for  the  County  of 
Bucks. 

The  Petition  of  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  the  second  son  of 
Andrew  Strassburger  late  of  Lehigh  County,  deceased. 

HUMBLY  SHEWETH  that  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  lately 
died  intestate  leaving  a  widow  named  Eve  and  issue  five  children  and  the 
representatives  of  a  sixth  who  is  deceased,  namely,  John  Strassberger,  the 
eldest  son;  John  Andrew  (your  petitioner)  ;  Catherine  intermarried  with 
Christian  Young;  the  representatives  of  Christiana  Wieder,  deceased,  for- 
merly Christiana  Strassberger  the  second  daughter  of  said  deceased, 
namely,  Hannah  intermarried  with  Thomas  Egner,  Caroline  Wieder, 
Eliza  Wieder  and  Jane  Wieder,  all  of  whom  are  in  their  minority;  Mary 
a  daughter  of  the  intestate  intermarried  with  John  Engelman,  and  Hannah 
a  daughter  of  the  intestate  intermarried  with  Christian  Berger,  being  all 
the  heirs  of  the  deceased.  And  that  the  said  deceased  seized  in  his 
demesne  as  of  fee  of  and  in  certain  real  estate  in  the  County  of  Bucks,  to 
wit:  two  certain  tracts  of  land  one  of  them  situated  in  Haycock  Town- 
ship, containing  24  acres  and  30  perches  of  land.  The  other  situated  in 
Springfield  Township  containing  23  acres  and  62  perches. 

Therefore  praying  the  Court  to  award  an  inquest  to  make  partition 
of  the  said  premises  to  and  among  the  widow  and  heirs  above  named  in 
such  manner  and  in  such  proportion  as  by  the  laws  of  this  Commonwealth 
is  directed,  but  if  partition  cannot  be  made  thereof  without  prejudice  to 
or  spoiling  the  whole,  then  to  inquire  into  how  many  parts  it  can  be  so 
divided  and  value  and  appraise  each  and  every  part  into  which  it  may  be 


7^  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

so  divided  specially  and  distinctly  and  make  report  of  their  proceedings  to 
the  next  Orphans'  Court.     November  6,  1827.^ 

In  pursuance  of  the  petition,  the  Court  of  Lehigh  County 
named  twelve  neighbors  and  friends,  "free,  honest  and  lawful 
men,"  who,  on  the  2nd  of  January,  1827,  visited  the  lands  and 
tenements  in  question  and  made  a  valuation  and  partition  of  the 
various  tracts." 

Inquisition  intended  and  taken  at  the  dwelling  house  of  Andrew 
Strassburger  late  of  Upper  MiLford  Township  in  the  County  of  Lehigh 
and  State  of  Pennsylvania,  on  the  second  day  of  January  in  the  year  of 
our  Lord  One  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty-seven,  before  Daniel 
Mertz,  Esquire,  High  Sherifif  of  said  County  of  Lehigh  by  virtue  of  a 
certain  writ  of  partition  and  valuation  to  him  directed  and  to  this  inquisi- 
tion annexed  by  the  oath  of  Lorenz  Stackler,  Daniel  Stackler,  Christian 
Brobst,  John  Nerfer,  Martin  Ritter,  John  Ritter,  Henry  Ritter,  Jacob 
Krauss,  Henry  Leibert,  Daniel  Mohr,  Daniel  Klein  and  Peter  Schwartz, 
twelve  free  honest  and  lawful  men  of  his  bailiwick  who  upon  their  oaths 
same  lands  and  tenements  with  their  appurtenances  could  not  be  parted 
and  divided  to  and  among  all  the  children  of  the  said  deceased,  without 
prejudice  to  or  spoiling  the  whole  and  the  Inquest  aforesaid  on  their 
aforesaid  respectively  do  say  that  on  the  day  and  year  aforesaid  they  went 
to  and  upon  the  lands  and  tenements  oi  which  Andrew  Strassburger  in 
the  said  writ  mentioned  died  seized  and  then  and  there  did  find  that  the 
oaths,  *  *  *  did  then  and  there  further  find  that  the  said  lands  and 
tenements  will  accommodate  five  of  the  children  of  the  said  deceased 
that  is  to  say  that  that  part  of  the  said  lands  and  tenements  included  in 
and  bounded  by  the  following  courses  and  distances  to  wit:  adjoining 
lands  of  Daniel  Wickert,  William  Brunner,  John  Riesser,  Abraham 
Shuler,  containing  two  hundred  and  thirty-four  acres  and  three  perches 
and  situate  in  Upper  Milford  Township  will  accommodate  one  of  the 
children  of  the  said  deceased,  which  the  Inquest  aforesaid  have  numbered 
No.  1.  And  that  that  other  part  of  the  said  lands  and  tenements  sit- 
uate and  being  in  said  township  adjoining  above  described  lands,  lands  of 
Abraham  Shuler,  Philip  Zeislufif  and  those  lands  marked  No.  3,  contain- 
ing sixteen  acres  and  forty-seven  perches  will  accommodate  one  other 


1  Orphans'  Court  Papers,  No.  3634,  Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Original  Papers  No.  1056,  Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  77 

o.f  the  children  of  said  deceased,  which  the  Inquest  aforesaid  have  num- 
bered Portion  No.  2.  And  that  other  tract  of  land  situate  in  said  Town- 
ship of  Upper  Milford  adjoining  lands  No.  1  and  2,  lands  late  of  John 
Vaght,  lands  late  of  Lawrence  Kern,  containing  seventeen  acres  and 
sixty-five  perches  will  accommodate  one  other  of  the  children  of  said 
deceased,  which  the  Inquest  aforesaid  have  numbered  portion  No.  3. 
And  that  that  other  tract  of  land  with  appurtenances  situate  in  Macungie 
Township,  said  County  of  Lehigh,  bounded  by  lands  of  Peter  Haas,  John 
Moore,  John  Sharer  and  others  containing  thirty-two  acres  of  land  will 
accommodate  one  other  of  the  children  and  heirs  of  the  said  deceased 
which  the  said  Inquest  have  numbered  portion  Number  Four.  And  that 
that  certain  messuage  and  lot  of  land  situate  in  the  Borough  of  Northamp- 
ton in  said  County  of  Lehigh,  situate  on  Lehigh  Street,  adjoining  lot  of 
William  Tilgman,  extending  one  hundred  feet  in  length  on  Lehigh  Street 
numbered  on  the  plan  o.f  said  Borough  771  will  accommodate  one  other 
of  the  children  and  heirs  of  said  deceased,  which  said  messuage  and  lot 
the  Inquest  aforesaid  have  numbered  portion  No.  5.  And  the  Inquest 
aforesaid  upon  their  oaths  do  value  and  appraise  that  part  of  the  said 
property  contained  in  portion  No.  1  at  and  for  the  sum  of  nineteen  dol- 
lars and  seventy-five  cents  per  acre  for  each  and  every  acre  the  said 
portion  No.  1,  contains,  and  *  *  *  they  do  value  that  part  of  said  prop- 
erty contained  in  Portion  No.  2  at  and  for  the  sum  of  twenty-one  dollars 
per  acre  for  each  and  every  acre  the  said  portion  No.  2  contains.  No.  3 
valued  at  and  for  the  sum  of  six  dollars  and  fifty  cents  for  each  and 
every  acre  said  portion  No.  3  contains,  No.  4  eleven  dollars  and  fifty  cents 
per  acre,  and  the  Inquest  aforesaid  upon  their  oaths  aforesaid  do  value 
and  appraise  that  part  of  the  said  property  contained  in  partition  No.  5, 
for  the  sum  of  two  dollars  and  fifty-six  cents  IN  WITNESS  whereof 
the  said  Sheriff  as  the  Inquest  aforesaid  to  this  Inquisition  in  the  presence 
of  the  parties  interested  have  set  their  hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year 
aforesaid. 

Daniel  Mertz,  Sheriff.  John  Ritter 

Daniel  Stahler  Henry  Ritter 

Lehrens  Stabler  Jacob  Krauss 

Christian  Brobst  Henry  Leibert 

Johannes Daniel  Mohr 

Martin  Ritter,  Jr.  Peter  Schwartz 

This  partition,  however,  did  not  meet  with  the  approval  of 
the  heirs,  who  all  refused  to  accept  it,  whereupon  the  Court,  on 
February  2,  1827,  ordered  the  estate  sold. 


78  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

On  December  4,  1826,  John  Strassburger  and  John  Engleman 
had  rendered  the  first  account  of  their  administration. 

The  account  of  John  Strassburger  and  John  Engleman,  Administra- 
tors of  all  and  singular  the  goods,  Chattels,  Rights,  Credits,  which  were 
of  Andrew  Strassburger,  late  of  Upper  Milford  Township,  in  the  County 
of  Lehigh,  deceased. 

The  said  Accountants  charge  themselves  with  all  and 
singular  the  goods,  chattels,  rights  and  credits  which  were 
of  the  said  deceased  agreeably  to  an  Inventory  thereof  filed  in 
the   Register's   office   in    and    for   the   County   of   Lehigh, 

amounting  to   $58990.62 

Inventory  calculated  thus : 

Articles  of  husbandry  and  household  goods.  .         383.91 

Book  Debts   36.34 

Bonds  &  Notes  with  interest 23364.59 

Bank  stock  two  shares  in  the  bank  of  North 

America    800.00 

stock    two    shares    in    the    bank    of 

Pennsylvania   800.00 

stock  fifty      do  in  Reading  Bank.  .  .        1500.00 
"     "  Easton        "    ...       1500.00 
"  "      four  hundred  and  three  in  the 

Northampton  Bank   18135.00 

"         stock  dividend  of  Northampton  Bank         344.05 
"         deposit  in  said  "  "  168.81 

47223.07 
Bonds  and  Notes  due  by  the  heirs, 

John  Andrew  Strassburger,  principal  and  interest  1124.13 
John  Engleman,  principal  and  interest  &  $29.19 

rent 2209.19 

Adam  Wieder's         do       do       do    1840.17 

Ditto        Note        do      do     875.82 

Christian  Berger       do       two  Bonds   2645.34 

Christian  Young  4  Bonds  2  Notes 3063.27>4 

To  total  amount  of  Inv 38990.62^^ 

To  the  Increase  of  the  sale  of  Bank  Stock, 

On  the  shares  of  the  Phila  Bank 277.00 

"     "       "         "    "     Easton  "     ....     287.50 

564.50 


THE  STI:Ai::i.u.-.^.avj;v  i /..vULY 


79 


To  Dividends  reireived  on  Eanl-.:  Stock  of  the 
two  rhiladelphia  Banks  ..       ^tS.lX) 

Eastoii  Bank- .  .        60.(X) 

Reatsiog  Bank 


^$M 


ines 


.75 


68.07 


770.57 


$59761. i9K 

i'o  the  increase  of  the  sale  of  goods . .      7.85 

To  Rents  received  of  the  following  peiiou.v,  viz, 

John  Remhardt  -..^^^a  i9»{-,wki»il?c  s^onitftH       25,CX> 

Deitrich  Gaumer 40.30 

Gottlieb  Beck  15.00 

Phiitp  Hahn .  15.0*3 

George  Neice    .,...-.  26.(X) 

_  Funk  .  .  ices'       1.31.30 

To  '  of  ^mndiy  persons 368,03' 

>...  U^'}2m.37yz 


ana 

the  estate, 

ti- rough  the 

th.at  v;^e  we, . 

Yeager,  as  slie 

Odenwelder. 


•.  Berts^er,  one 

hter, 

'nail, 

re  of 

3  it  was 

.vt  this  time, 

■  aage  of  Eva 

:,  Maria  Yeager 


■M. 


Hannah  Strassburger  Berger. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  79 


To  Dividends  received  on  Bank  Stock  of  the 

two  Philadelphia  Banks 48.00 

Easton  Bank 60.00 

Reading  Bank   30.00 


138.00 
To  Cash  received  of  the  following  persons  not 
Inventories, 

0.f  Jacob  Schanzebach  for  sundries 52.00 

"    Philip  Zeissloff,  Book  Debt 5.32 

"    Andrew  Martin      "        "     3.90 

"    Henry  Romig 3.10 

"    Benj.  Ludwig  for  a  bark  mill  stone.  . .  .  3.00 

"    Adam  Wieder,  stones  .75 


68.07 


770.57 


$59761. 19>^ 

To  the  increase  of  the  sale  of  goods 7.85 

To  Rents  received  of  the  following  persons,  viz. 

John  Remhardt 25.00 

Deitrich   Gaumer    40.30 

GottHeb  Beck    15.00 

Philip  Hahn    15.00 

George  Neice    26.00 

Funk 10.00        131.30 

To  Interests  received  of  sundry  persons 368.03 

.       Dec.  4.  1826 $60268.37^^ 

Exceptions  to  the  account  were  filed  by  Christian  Berger,  one 
of  the  sons-in-law,  who  had  married  Elizabeth,  the  eldest  daughter. 
She  died  leaving  no  children.  He  then  married  her  sister,  Hannah, 
and  thus  there  was  some  question  as  to  Christian's  exact  share  of 
the  estate.  The  following  paper  is  of  unusual  interest,  as  it  was 
through  the  affidavit  of  Philip  Oden welder,  Jr.,  taken  at  this  time, 
that  we  were  able  to  positively  identify  the  parentage  of  Eva 
Yeager,  as  she  was  a  sister  to  young  Philip's  mother,  Maria  Yeager 
Odenwelder. 


80  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

In  the  Orphans'  Court  County  of  Lehigh  of  April  Term,  1827 

In  the  matter  of  the  settlement  of  the  second  act  of  John  Strassburger 
and  John  Engleman,  administrators  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased. 

Exceptions  filed  May  4,  1827.  On  motion  of  A.  Runk  Rule  to  show 
cause  why  the  sum  of  sixteen  hundred  dollars  charged  against  Christian 
Berger  as  part  of  said  $2645.34  in  the  report  shall  not  be  struck  out 
according  to  the  tenor  of  said  exceptions  and  the  said  $475  charged  for 
thereon  in  settling  said  Estate  be  reduced  to  a  reasonable  allowance. 

July  23,  1827.  Rule  on  the  part  of  Christian  Berger  the  Exceptor  to 
take  the  deposition  of  witnesses  before  any  Judge  Justice  appointed  by 
the  Court  in  the  County  of  Lehigh  to  be  read  in  Evidence  and  the  Argu- 
ment of  the  above  rule. 

A  true  copy  of  the  Original  is  filed. 
July  23,  1827. 

Frederick  Hyneman,  Clk. 

July  23,  1827. 

To  John  Strassburger,  John  Engleman,  John  Andrew  Strassburger, 
Christian  Young  and  Catherine  his  wife,  John  Dillinger,  guardian  of 
Caroline  Weider,  John  J.  Krauss,  guardian  for  Hannah  Egner  late  Weider, 
Henry  Meyer,  Guardian  for  Mary  Ann  Weider,  Jacob  Diess,  guardian 
for  Eliza  Weider,  Adam  Weider  guardian  for  Silas  Weider  and  the 
Widow  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased. 

You  will  Please  to  take  notice  that  the  above  rule  of  Court  the  de- 
position of  witnesses  to  be  read  in  evidence  on  the  part  of  Christian 
Berger,  the  exceptor  on  the  argument  of  the  above  rule  will  be  taken  at 
the  house  of  George  Rhoads  in  the  Borough  of  Northampton,  County  of 
Lehigh  before  George  Rhoads  examiner,  appointed  by  the  Court  for 
Lehigh  County. 

In  the  Orphans'  Court  of  the  County  of  Lehigh  May  4,  1827.  Rule 
to  take  the  depositions  of  Witnesses  in  the  matter  of  the  administrators' 
account  of  the  Estate  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  relating  to  the 
settlement  and  distribution  of  the  personal  estate  of  said  deceased.  And 
now  to  wit,  September  1,  1827,  in  pursuance  of  the  said  will  the  following 
depositions  were  taken,  viz : 

Philip  Odenwelder,  Jr.,  sworn  deposeth  and  saith  at  and  during  the 
time  (but  I  do  not  recollect  the  time  when  Christian  Berger  had  Mr. 
Andrew  Strassburger's  first  daughter  for  his  wife)  Mr.  Strassburger  in 
going  to  and  passing  from  Easton,  frequently  stopped  at  my  father's 
house,  with  whom  I  live,  Mr.  Strassburger  told  my  father  in  my  pres- 
ence and  to  me  too,  that  he  had  given  to  Mr.  Berger  or  his  wife  about  $800 


Books  from  the  Library  of  Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  81 

towards  on  account  of  her  Erbshaft  and  that  he  had  taken  of  him  one  or 
two  bonds  for  the  money  I  think  it  was  one,  but  I  am  not  sure,  that  he  had 
given  about  the  like  sum  to  Wieder's  wife  and  to  Young's  wife  and  that 
he  had  taken  bonds  from  every  of  them,  if  in  case  they  would  not  keep 
good  house  that  he  could  get  it  back  again  and  that  after  his  death  it 
might  be  sure  what  each  one  had.  Mr.  Strassburger  frequently  praised 
Mr.  Berger  as  a  good  housekeeper.  After  the  decease  of  Mr.  Berger's 
first  wife  I  heard  old  Strassburger  say  if  he  had  thought  Mrs.  Berger  was 
to  die  without  issue  he  would  not  have  given  her  so  much  money.  After 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  Berger  with  Mr.  Strassburger's  second  daughter  I 
heard  him  (Mr.  Strassburger)  say,  that  he  was  now  satisfied,  and  that  he 
might  keep  the  money  and  that  now  he  had  his  other  daughter  and  that 
he  thought  he  would  keep  house  as  well  with  this  one  as  with  the  other. 

Philip  Odenwelder,  Jr. 
Sworn  and  subscribed  September  1,   1827,  before  me,  George  Rhodes, 
Examiner. 

Lorentz  Stabler,  sworn  saith,  Andrew  Strassburger  had  been  often 
with  me.  Mr.  Strassburger  frequently  told  me  that  he  had  given  money 
to  Berger  and  they  got  no  children  together  and  had  no  heirs;  at  one 
time  Strassburger  came  to  me  complained  of  Mr.  Berger  and  said  only 
think  what  a  bad  man  Mr.  Berger  was.  I  have  been  up  with  him,  Mr. 
Berger,  and  demanded  of  him  another  writing  as  they  had  no  children 
when  Berger  ordered  or  put  him  out  of  doors,  this  was  in  the  time 
Berger's  first  wife  was  living.  One  other  time  Mr.  Strassburger  came 
to  me  and  told  me  that  he  had  now  given  his  son  Andrew  I  think  not  less 
than  $800  and  that  they  were  all  even.  After  Berger's  second  marriage 
Mr.  Strassburger  came  to  my  house  and  I  heard  him  say  that  he  was 
satisfied  with  him,  that  they  had  now  children  and  very  fine  children  too. 
Sworn  and  subscribed  September  1,  1827,  Lohrens  Stabler 

George  Rhodes,  Examiner. 

Rev.  John  Conrad  Yeager  sworn  deposeth  and  saith,  In  the  year 
1812  in  harvest  time  Christian  Berger's  first  wife  was  buried  and  I 
preached  the  funeral  sermon.  Sometime  in  the  fall  following  of  the 
same  year,  I  married  Christian  Berger  to  Hannah,  a  daughter  of  Andrew 
Strassburger.  The  Christian  name  of  Berger's  first  wife  was  Elizabeth. 
She  had  been  sent  to  me  after  her  marriage  to  be  confirmed.  She  also 
had  been  a  daughter  of  said  Strassburger. 

Sworn  and  subscribed  September  1,  1827,      John  Conrad  Yeager. 
George  Rhodes,  Examiner. 


82  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Frederick  Hyneman,  Esquire,  sworn  deposeth  and  saith,  it  was 
shortly  before  the  death  of  old  Mr.  Strassburger,  he  was  in  town,  I  be- 
lieve it  was  the  last  time  I  have  seen  him  in  town.  He  came  to  my  office 
to  the  stove  to  warm  himself.  Christian  Young,  his  son-in-law,  was  with 
him  in  town  and  had  been  transacting  his  ordinary  business,  while  Young 
was  doing  the  business  in  the  Prothonataries  Office,  I  mentioned  to  Mr. 
Strassburger  that  Young  was  a  great  help  to  him,  he  then  replied  they 
can  well  assist  me.  I  have  given  to  each  of  my  Children  three  hundred 
pounds  as  Erbshaft  and  some  wanted  more,  but  said  that  they  may  wait 
he  would  not  give  them  any  more. 

Sworn  and  subscribed  September  1,  1827,  Fred'^  Hyneman. 

George  Rhodes,  Examiner. 

Deposition  of  witnesses  taken  January  8,  1827,  at  the  house  of  George 
Rhodes  in  the  Borough  of  Northampton,  Lehigh  County. 

John  Conrad  Yeager.  In  the  month  of  July,  1812,  Christian  Berger's 
wife  Elizabeth,  who  was  a  daughter  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  was  buried 
and  I  preached  the  funeral  sermon.  In  the  fall  of  the  same  year  I  mar- 
ried Christian  Berger  to  another  daughter  of  Mr.  Strassburger  by  the 
name  of  Hannah,  who  is  still  alive  and  has  children  living.  Elizabeth 
the  first  wife  had  been  married  to  Christian  Berger.  He  sent  her  to  me  to 
be  christened  and  confirmed  in  the  Lutheran  Church. 
Sworn  and  subscribed  January  27,  1827,  John  Conrad  Yeager, 
George  Rhodes,  Examiner. 

William  Horsfield.  Mr.  Strassburger  mentioned  to  me  that  he  had 
given  to  his  son-in-law  Christian  Berger  three  hundred  pounds  that  he 
had  taken  his  bond  and  had  given  it  to  him  as  part  of  his  wife's  inherit- 
ance That  he  had  made  it  a  rule  to  take  bonds  from  each  of  his  children, 
that  he  had  advanced  toward  their  inheritance  happening  to  be  in  conver- 
sation with  Mr.  Strassburger  after  the  death  of  Berger's  first  wife  Eliza- 
beth, Mr.  Strassburger  told  me  the  three  hundred  pounds  which  he  had 
given  Berger,  was  now  gone  and  Mr.  Strassburger  told  me  that  Berger 
after  that  wanted  more  money  but  as  Berger  had  been  in  a  good  way  of 
making  money  he  thought  it  not  necessary  and  did  not  give  him  any  more. 
This  conversation  all  happened  before  the  second  marriage  of  Christian 
Berger. 

Will.  Horsfield. 

Frederick  Hyneman,  Esq.  Mr,  Andrew  Strassburger  shortly  before 
his  death  came  to  me  into  my  office  and  among  other  conversation  we  then 
had  told  me  that  he  advanced  each  of  his  children  three  hundred  pounds  as 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  83 

"Erbshaft"  and  that  some  of  them  wanted  more  but  that  he  gave  them 
no  more. 

Fred.  Hyneman. 

Phihp  Odenoulder,  Jr.  Mr.  Andrew  Strassburger  and  my  father 
were  brothers-in-law  and  Mr.  Strassburger  generally  on  his  way  to  Easton 
called  at  our  home  near  Easton  and  I  heard  Mr.  Strassburger  tell  my 
father  that  he  had  given  Christian  Berger  about  $800  towards  his  wife 
Elizabeth's  portion  and  that  he  would  also  give  to  his  other  sons-in-law 
the  like  towards  their  portions.  That  he  had  taken  a  Bond  of  Berger  for 
the  money  payable  with  interest  and  that  he  was  determined  to  do  so 
with  every  one  of  his  children  that  he  gave  in  advance  if  in  case  they 
would  not  make  good  use  with  that  money  he  had  it  in  his  power  to  get 
it  back  again.  After  the  decease  of  Berger's  first  wife,  Mr.  Strassburger 
told  me  that  if  Berger  would  marry  again  to  his  satisfaction  that  he  would 
not  have  the  money  back  again  that  he  gave  him  towards  his  said  de- 
ceased wife  Elizabeth's  portion.  I  also  know  that  Christian  Berger  had 
been  married  to  said  Elizabeth  Strassburger,  the  daughter  of  Andrew 
Strassburger. 

Philip  Oldenwelder,  Jr. 

In  the  meantime  the  lands,  including  a  house  and  lot  in  Allen- 
town,  were  advertised  for  sale  and  disposed  of  as  purchasers 
presented  themselves/ 

To  the  Honorable  the  Judges  within  named : 

We  the  within  named  John  Strassburger  and  John  Engleman,  Admin- 
istrators of  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  DO  humbly  report  that  in 
pursuance  of  the  within  order  of  Court  (after  having  given  due  public 
and  timely  notice  of  the  time  and  place  of  sale)  we  did  on  the  said  several 
days  as  within  directed,  expose  the  lands  and  premises  within  mentioned 
to  sale  by  public  vendue  or  outcry,  and  did  sell  on  Saturday  the  tenth  day 
o.f  March  last  past  purport  No.  3  being  a  certain  lot  or  piece  of  land  sit- 
uate in  Upper  Milford  Township,  containing  sixteen  acres  and  sixty-five 
perches  and  allowance  with  a  log  house  and  stable,  thereon  erected  unto 
Joseph  Mill  for  the  sum  of  two  hundred  and  ninety-five  dollars  and  fifty- 
three  cents  *  *  *  and  on  the  third  Thursday  of  the  same  Month  being 
the  twentieth  day,  did  sell  purport  No.  5,  being  a  Certain  Tenement  and 
lot  of  ground  situate  on  North  side  of  Lehigh  Street  in  the  Borough  of 


1  Original  Papers  No.  1056,  Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


84  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Northampton  unto  John  Nunemacher,  of  the  said  Borough  for  the  sum  of 
two  hundred  and  one  dollars  to  be  paid  respectively  as  follows,  to  wit: 
one  third  on  confirmation  of  sale,  one  third  in  one  year  thereafter,  with 
lawful  interest,  and  the  remaining  third  thereof  at  and  immediately  after 
the  decease  of  Eve  Strassburger,  the  widow  of  the  said  deceased  with 
interest  payable  annually  to  the  said  wadow.     May  4,  1827. 

December  Term  Orphans'  Court,  1827.     December  13. 

We  the  withinnamed  administrators  do  Humbly  Report  that  after 
giving  due  public  and  timely  notice  of  the  time  and  place  of  sale  we  ex- 
posed the  within  mentioned  premises  to  sale  by  public  vendue  or  outcry 
and  sold  one  lot  thereof  to  wit :  No.  4  situate  in  Macungie  Township,  to 
Jacob  Fry  for  the  sum  of  three  hundred  and  thirty-seven  dollars  and  fifty 
cents  on  the  conditions  in  the  said  order  set  forth. 


Mn  ^r^ 


ciyrxJ 


Fifth  day  September,  1828,  Orphans'  Court  of  Lehigh  County. 

We  the  subscribers  do  humbly  report  that  after  having  given  due 
public  and  seemly  notice  o.f  the  time  and  place  of  sale  we  did  on  the  day 
and  at  the  place  in  the  said  order  set  forth  expose  the  premises  in  the 
said  order  mentioned  to  public  vendue  or  outcry  and  sold  the  same  to 
Christian  Young  for  the  sum  of  sixteen  dollars  and  seventy-seven  cents 
per  acre  for  each  and  every  acre  that  the  same  contains  (two  hundred 
and  thirty-four  acres  and  three  perches)  on  the  conditions  in  the  said 
order  set  forth  he  being  the  highest  and  best  bidder  that  bid  for  the  same 
and  that  being  the  highest  and  best  price  bidder  for  the  same  which  sale 
so  made  thereof  as  aforesaid 

We  pray  may  be  confirmed.    December  5,  1828. 

John  Strassburger  and  John  Engleman,  Administrators  of  Andrew 
Strassburger,  Deceased,  to  John  Nunnemacker,  1827 

Cl)i0  3n Denture  Made  the  fourth  day  of  May  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty-seven,  Between  John  Strass- 
burger and  John  Engleman,  administrators  all  and  singular  the  goods 
and  chattels  rights  and  credits  which  were  of  Andrew  Strassburger  late 
of  Upper  Milford  Township  in  the  County  of  Lehigh  in  the  State  of 
Pennsylvania,  yeoman,  deceased,  who  died  intestate,  o,f  the  one  part,  and 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  85 

John  Nunnemacker  of  the  Borough  of  Northampton  in  the  County  of 
Lehigh  and  State  of  Pennsylvania,  aforesaid,  of  the  other  part.  WIT- 
NESSETH that  the  said  John  Strassburger  and  John  Engleman  for  and 
in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  sixty-seven  dollars  as  hereinafter  men- 
tioned and  reserved  and  for  the  further  sum  of  one  hundred  and  thirty- 
four  dollars  to  them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  John  Nunnemacker  Have 
granted  bargained  sold  released  and  confirmed  and  by  these  presents  by 
virtue  of  the  Power  and  authority  to  them  given  by  an  order  of  the 
Orphans'  Court  hereinafter  recited  and  pursuant  to  the  directing  thereof 
Do  grant  bargain  sell  release  and  confirm  unto  the  said  John  Nunne- 
macker and  to  his  heirs  and  assigns  ALL  that  tenement  and  tract  of 
ground  situate  on  the  northwest  side  of  Lehigh  Street  in  the  Borough  of 
Northampton  aforesaid  bounded  and  described  as  follows,  to  wit:  ad- 
joining lot  No.  772  fronting  southwest  one  hundred  feet  running  back 
northeast  one  hundred  feet  on  the  southeast  side  one  hundred  feet  in 
breadth  one  hundred  feet  in  depth  being  numbered  on  the  plan  of  said 
Borough  771,  Being  the  same  lot  and  premises  which  Jacob  Mertin  and 
others  assigned  to  John  Wagner  by  Indenture  under  their  hands  and 
seals  bearing  date  December  18,  1823,  duly  acknowledged  and  intended 
to  be  recorded  did  grant  and  convey  unto  said  Andrew  Strassburger  who 
being  so  seized  thereof  died  intestate  and  after  his  death  on  due  applica- 
tion to  the  Orphans'  Court  of  the  County  o.f  Lehigh  the  said  lot  of  ground 
and  premises  was  duly  valued  and  appraised  and  at  an  Orphans  Court 
held  at  the  Borough  of  Northampton  in  and  for  the  County  of  Lehigh  the 
ninth  day  of  February  past  all  the  heirs  and  legal  representatives  of  said 
intestate  appeared  in  open  court  and  severally  and  respectively  refused  to 
take  the  same  at  the  valuation  thereof  and  desired  that  the  same  among 
other  real  estate  might  be  sold  *  *  *  and  it  was  therefore  ordered  by 
the  said  Court  that  the  administrators  aforesaid  should  proceed  to  make 
sale  of  the  said  before  mentioned  and  described  lot  of  ground  and  prem- 
ises by  public  vendue  or  outcry  on  the  twentieth  day  of  March  then  next. 
IN  PURSUANCE  of  which  said  order  the  said  administrators  did  on 
the  day  and  in  the  manner  prescribed  sell  the  said  lot  of  ground  and  prem- 
ises to  the  said  John  Nunnemacker  .for  the  sum  of  two  hundred  and  one 
dollars  being  the  highest  bidder  and  best  price  bidder.  *  *  *  TO  HAVE 
AND  TO  HOLD  the  said  tenement  and  lot  of  ground  hereditaments  and 
premises  hereby  granted  unto  the  said  John  Nunnemacker  his  heirs  and 
assigns  forever.  Subject  nevertheless  to  the  payment  of  the  sum  of  sixty- 
seven  dollars  the  part  of  the  consideration  Money  above  mentioned  pay- 
able immediately  after  the  decease  of  Eve  Strassburger,  widow  of  the 
said  Intestate,  and  the  yearly  interest  thereof  unto  the  said  widow  or  her 


86  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

order  during  the  time  of  her  natural  life  and  under  the  payment  of  the 
yearly  ground  rent  of  two  dollars  lawful  money  of  the  United  States  now 
due  and  which  will  hereafter  come  due  and  payable  thereunto  to  the  heirs 
o.f  James  Allen  deceased  on  the  first  day  of  June  yearly  forever.  In  Wit- 
ness whereof  the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have  hereunto  set  their 
hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year  just  above  written/ 

John    Strassburger 
John  Engleman 

As  noted  above,  Christian  Young  purchased  lot  No.  1  as 
designated  in  the  partition  proceedings,  which  was  the  homestead 
farm. 

Deed  :  John  Strassburger  et  al  to  Christian  Young,  1827 

Cl)i0  3lnDCntUt0  Made  the  twenty-fourth  day  of  December  in  the 
year  of  our  Lord  One  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty-eight  Between 
John  Strassburger  and  John  Engleman,  administrators  of  the  Estate  of 
Andrew  Strassburger,  late  of  Upper  Milford  Township  in  the  County  of 
Lehigh  and  State  of  Pennsylvania,  yeoman,  deceased,  and  who  died 
intestate  of  the  one  part  and  Christian  Young  of  Lower  Milford  Town- 
ship in  the  County  of  Bucks  in  the  State  of  Pennsylvania  aforesaid  ol 
the  other  part,  WITNESSETH  that  the  said  John  Strassburger  and 
John  Engleman  as  well  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  thirteen 
hundred  and  eight  dollars  and  sixteen  cents  with  its  annual  interest  to  be 
paid  as  hereinafter  mentioned  and  reserved  as  also  for  the  sum  of  twenty- 
six  hundred  and  sixteen  dollars  and  thirty-three  cents  lawful  money  of 
the  United  States  HAVE  granted  bargained  sold  released  and  confirmed 
and  by  these  presents  by  virtue  of  the  Power  and  authority  to  them  given 
by  an  Order  of  the  Orphans'  Court  hereinafter  recited  and  pursuant  to 
the  directions  thereof  Do  grant  bargain  sell  release  and  confirm  unto  the 
said  Christian  Young  his  heirs  and  assigns  all  that  certain  Messuage 
Tenement  Plantation  and  tract  of  land  situate  lying  and  being  in  Upper 
Milford  Township  in  the  County  of  Lehigh  aforesaid  bounded  and 
described  as  follows,  to  wit:  Beginning  at  the  corner  of  the  said  John 
Strassburger's  land  thence  by  land  of  David  Wickert,  William  Brunner, 
land  late  of  John  Rieser,  and  Abraham  Shuller.  Containing  two  hun- 
dred and  thirty-four  acres  and  three  perches  (Being  the  same  Messuage 
Plantation  and  greater  part  of  the  lands  thereto  belonging  which  Peter 


^Deed  Book  No.  10,  p.  211.     Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


grniiDMartinlufe/®!; 

mtt  Mini 

ten  g:d{^t\f)ntm<^m  /aiiffi  viden  bunlHTf  cri  I-ocis  ParalleK^ ., 
failK  S^tbiWftm  unS  >;ju^i<^  Pummarim ;  3ttm  /  gans  nciK  .    J 

VlitmMKn  jMUirB /  oBKiiiioi  MUrMfflcwnScsMitr/ IJMlrtiUt  'i 

\r  -  xi  I  iitf  — ~-*;f'^ 


The    Bible   being   the   entire 

Holy    Scriptures 

Old 

and 

New  Testaments 

in   German 

Martin   Luther 

Anno 

1700. 


rebiotm/ 


^)bct  fo  (net  ^crt  ^diBO'Bcfirtfc/ 

<Bci?4ttnun{>  in  Cru*  wfcrtf3«/ 

D.l  IICA  GRRNLERO.fcl 

in  &«n  5rucf  Ofgjjn!K-'"n  'l>iit'!3t™/ 
jiif«mmtn  aettucti  / 

ncfjftrm&ia'it  afgilitinwwn- 


l1 


(Translation) 
One  Hundred  and  Ten  Sermons  with  instruc- 
tion, comfort  and  admonition  upon  many  texts 
of  Holy  Scripture,  for  funerals  and  other  oc- 
casions, preached  and  printed  by  D.  Luca 
Gernlero,  deceased,  formerly  chief  minister  and 
professor  of  the  Holy  Scriptures  in  Basle. 
Printed   in   the  year   1685. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  87 

Shuller  and  Mary  Catherine  his  wife  by  Indenture  bearing  date  the 
twenty-third  day  of  May  A.  D.  1789,  of  record  in  the  Office  for  Recording 
Deeds  at  Easton  in  and  for  the  County  of  Northampton  in  Book  F,  p.  595. 
*  *  *  did  grant  and  confirm  unto  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger  in  fee 
and  who  being  so  thereof  seized  died  intestate  and  after  his  death  on  due 
application  and  legal  proceedings  having  first  been  had  in  the  Orphans' 
Court  for  Lehigh  County  was  by  an  inquest  duly  valued  and  appraised 
and  designated  in  an  Inquisition  thereof  as  portion  No.  1,  of  which  said 
portion  No.  1  all  the  heirs  and  legal  representatives  of  said  Intestate  have 
severally  and  respectively  refused  to  accept  the  same  at  the  valuation 
thereof  made  and  desired  that  the  same  should  be  sold  according  to  law. 
Whereupon  in  pursuance  of  a  decree  of  the  said  Orphans'  Court  and  by 
an  order  of  Sale  the  administrators  aforesaid  on  the  first  of  November 
last  by  public  Vendue  or  outcry  sold  the  said  premises  unto  the  said  Chris- 
tian Young  for  the  sum  of  three  thousand  nine  hundred  and  twenty-four 
dollars  and  forty-nine  cents  he  being  the  highest  and  best  price  bidder  for 
the  same.  *  *  *  Together  with  all  and  singular  the  houses  outshouses, 
barns,  stables,  Ways,  Woods,  Waters,  Water  courses,  rights,  liberties 
privileges,  hereditaments  and  appurtenances  whatsoever  thereunto  belong- 
ing. *  *  *  To  have  and  to  hold  the  said  Messuage  Tenement  Plantation 
and  tract  of  land  hereby  granted  to  the  said  Christian  Young,  SUBJECT 
nevertheless  to  the  payment  of  an  annual  Interest  of  seventy-eight  dollars 
and  forty-eight  cents  unto  Eve  Strassburger  the  widow  and  relict  of  said 
Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  during  her  natural  life  and  at  and  im- 
mediately  after  her  decease  the  sum  of  thirteen  hundred  and  eight  dollars 
and  fifteen  cents  the  above  recited  part  of  the  consideration  money  unto 
the  heirs  of  said  Intestate  and  to  their  heirs  and  assigns'  and  to  each  of 
them  his  or  their  respective  portions  thereof.  IN  WITNESS  Whereof 
the  said  parties  have  hereunto  set  their  hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year 
above  written.^ 

John    Strassburger 
John  Engleman 

The  administrators  rendered   a  second   account   September, 

1827:^ 

The  account  of  John  Strassburger  and  John  Engle- 
man,  administrators   of    estate   of   Andrew    Strassburger, 


iDeed  Book  No.  6,   p.  511.     Allentown,   Pennsylvania. 

2  Original  Papers  No.  1056,  Orphans'  Court,  Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


88  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

deceased,    as    corrected    by    the    Orphans'    Court    of    the 

County  of  Lehigh,  September  Term,  1827 4753.56>4 

Disbursements,   debts,   charges,   etc 2663.47 

Balance  brought  forward 44390.09 >4 

To  the  following  Sums  due  by  the  following  named  Heirs, 

Christian    Berger    amount    of    his 

Bond    169.64 

Int.  from  May  27,  1805,  to  Sept.  5, 

1828,  23  yrs.  3  mo.  8  d 236.86 

Amount  of  his  Note 368,67 

Int.  from  Feb.  15,  1810,  to  Sept.  5 

1828,  18  yrs.  6  mo.  20  d 410.45 

538.31     647.31 

538.31       1185.62 
Christian  Young,  Amount  of  his  Bond, 

No.   1    266.67 

Int.  from  Dec.  13,  1809,  to  Sept.  5, 

1828,  18  yr.  8  mo.  2d 299.64 

Bond   No.   2 266.67 

Int.  from  Nov.  27,  1815,  to  Sept.  5, 

1828,  16  yr.       mo.  7  d 268.40 

Bond   No.   3 266.67 

Int.  from  Nov.  27,  1816,  to  Sept.  5, 

1828,   11  yr.       9     188.40 

Note  No.  1    24.33y2 

Int.  from  March  27,  1824,  to  Sept.  5, 

1828,  4  yrs.  5  mo.  8  d 6.48 

Note  No.  2 18.44 

Int.  from  June  11,  1824,  to  Sept.  5, 

1828,  4  yr.  2  mo.  24  d 4.67 

Rent  as  of  Inventory   20.00 

Int.  from  May  16,  1825,  to  Sept.  5, 

1828,  3  yr.  3  mo.  19  d 3.96 

862.78>^  862.78      1634.33 
John  Engleman,  amount  o.f  part  of  his 

Bond    800.00 

Int.  from  May  1,  1819,  to  Sept.  5, 

1828,  9  yr.  4  mo.  4  d 448.53 

Amount   charged   on   the   Inventory      29.19 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  89 

Int.  from  May  16,  1825,  to  Sept.  5, 

1828,  3  yr.  3  mo.  19  d 5.77 

829.19    454.30 

829.19      1283.49 
To  interest  accrued  on  the  several  payments  made 
to  the  Widow  of  said  Intestate  on  account 

of  her  share  of  said  estate 1930.55 

To  the  Interest  accrued  on  the  several  pay- 
ments made  to  the  children  of  said  Intestate 
on  account  of  their  respective  shares  of  said 
Estate,  viz : 

John  Andrew  Strassburger  account  annexed.     888.93 
John  Strassburger,  do  822.33 

Christian  Berger  and  Hannah  his  wife        do     659.78 
Christian  Young  &  Catherine    "      "  do     707.38 

John  Engleman  &  Maria  "      "  do     483.22 

The  children  of  Christina,  the  late  wife  of 

Adam  Wieder    396.25 

3957.89 


Amount  carried   forward 54381.98 

Amount  brought   forward 54381.98 

Deduct  widow's  third 18127.32 


Balance  to  be  divided  among  the   six  children  x 

of  the  said  Intestate  and  their  legal  repre- 
sentatives, viz. :  John  Andrew  Strassburger, 
John  Strassburger,  Catherine,  the  wife  of 
Christian  Young,  Hannah  the  wife  of  Chris- 
tian Berger,  Maria  the  wife  of  John  Engle- 
man, and  the  children  of  Christina,  the  late 
wife  of  Adam  Wieder 36254.66 

The  following  advancements  made  by  the  said 
Intestate  in  his  life  time  to  the  following 
named  of  his  children,  viz : 

John   Engleman    800.00 

John  Andrew  Strassburger 800.00 

Christian  Young 800.00 


90                      THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 
Christian  Wieder   1066.67 


3466.67 


39721.33 

John  Andrew   Strassburger's  share 6620.22  1/6 

Advancement    800.00 

Cash    received    of    the    Adm"    in    sundry 

payments    5177.00 

Interest  accrued  thereon 888.93 

6865.93 

Amount  of  his  share 6620.22 

Amount  over  paid  him 245.71 

John  Strassburger's  share 6620.22  1/6 

Cash  received  of  Adm  in  Bank  stock  as  acct 

annexed    4339.50 

Interest  accrued  thereon 822.33 

Balance  due  him 1458.39 

6620.22 

Christian  Young  and  Catherine  his  wife's  share  6620.22  1/6 

Advancement    800.00 

Sundry  payments  made  them  by  the  Intestate 

as  .foregoing  account 862.78 J^ 

Interest  accrued  thereon    771.55 

Sundry  payments  made  to  them  by  Adm''^  as 

acct  annexed    3719.35 

Interest  accrued  thereon 707.38 

6861.06 

Their   share    6620.22 

Overpaid  them    240.84 

Christian  Berger  &  Hannah  his  wife  share.  . .  .  6620.22  1/6 
Sundry  payments  made  to  them  by  Intestate 

as  foregoing  account 538.31 

Interest  accrued  thereon 647.31 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY 


91 


Sundry  payments  made  to  them  by  Adm  as 

account  annexed    500.00 

Interest  accrued   thereon 659.78 

Balance   due   them 274.82 

6620.22 

John  Engleman  &  Maria  his  wife's  share 

Advancement    800.00 

Sundry  payments  made  to  them  by  the  Intes- 
tate as  foregoing  account 829.19 

Interest  accrued  thereon 454.40 

Cash  received  of  the  Adm'" 2550.00 

Interest  accrued  thereon 483.22 

Balance  due  them   1503.41 


6620.22  1/6 


6620.22 


The  children  of  Christiana  the  late  v^^ife  of  Adam 

Wieder  share   6620.22  1/6 

Advancement    1066.67 

Cash  received  by  their  guardian  of  the 
administrators  in  sundry  payments  as  of 
the  account  annexed .     4440.00 

Interest  accrued  thereon 396.25 

Balance  due  them 757.30 

6620.22    39721.33 

Widow    Eve    Strassberger's    portion    as    above 

stated     18127.32     18127.32 

Cash    received    of    the    administrators     as 

account  annexed    13609.89 

Interest  thereon  of  ditto 1930.55 

Balance  due  her 2586.88 


18127.32 


Dr.  Eve  Strassburger  to  the  Administrators  of  the  Estate  of  Andrew 

Strassburger,   deceased. 
July  8,  To  178  shares  in  the  Northampton  Bank    8010.00 


92  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

1825  Interest  to  Sept.  5,  1828,  3  yrs.  1  mo. 

27  d 1517.90 

May  25,         Cash    58.89 

1826  Interest  2  yr.  3  mo.  10  d 8.18 

June  25,         Cash  in  two  payments  $3000  &  $2000.  .  .     5000.00 

1827  Interest  1  yr.  3  mo 375.00 

Sept.  13,        Cash    89.00 

Interest  11  mo.  22  d 5.22 

Sept.  25,        Cash    30.00 

Interest   11  mo.   10  d 1-70 

Oct.  3,  Cash    50.00 

Interest  11  mo.  2  d 2.77 

Oct.  15,         Cash    371.00 

Interest  10  mo.  20  d 19.78 

13609.09    1930.55 
Dr.  John  Strassburger  to  said  adm""® 

1825 
July  8,  To  50  shares  of  Easton  Bank 

stock    1787.50 

To  15     shares     Northampton 

Bank    675. 

To  2    shares    North    America 

Bank    934. 

To  2  Pennsylvania  Bank 943. 

4339.50 

Interest  to  Sept.  5,   1828,  3  yr.   1   mo. 

27  d 822.33 

Dr.  John  Andrew  Strassburger  to  said  Admrs. 

July  8,  To  50  shares  Northampton  Bank  stock     2250.00 

1825  Interest  to  Sept.  5,  1828,  3  yr.  1  mo.  27  d.  426.37 
Sept.  13,        Cash  in  two  payments  $827  &  $100. .  . .       927.00 

Interest  to  Sept.  5,  1828,  2  yrs.  11  mo. 

22  d 165.63 

Nov.  15,        Cash    1000.00 

1826  Interest  to  Sept.  5,  1828,  2  yrs.  9  mo. 

20  d 168.33 

March  23,      Cash  two  payments  $500  &  $200 700.00 

1826  Interest             ''          2  yrs.  5  mo.   12  d.  102.90 
Dec.  1,           Cash    100.00 

1827  Interest,  1  yr.  9  mo.  5  d 10.57 


Book  Plates  from  Library  of 
Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  93 

June  1,  Cash    200.00 

Interest,  1  yr.  3  mo.  4  d 15.13 


5177.00      888.93 
Dr.  Christian  Berger  to  said  Admrs. 

July  8,  50  shares  Northampton  Bank 

1825  stock    2250. 

20  shares  of  Reading 600.        2850.00 

Interest  to  Sept.  5,   1828,  3  yr.   1  mo. 

27   d 540.07 

May  23,         Cash    650.00 

1826  Interest  to  Sept.  5,  1828,  2  yrs.  3  mo. 

12  d 89.05 

March  1,       Cash    1000.00 

1827  Interest  to  Sept.  5,  1828,  6  mo.  4  d. . .  .  30.66 

4500.00      659.78 
Dr.        John  Engleman  to  said  Admrs. 
July  8,  50  shares   Northampton   Bank 

1825  stock    2250. 

10  shares  Reading 300.        2550.00 

Interest  thereon  to  Sept.  5,  3  yrs.  10  mo. 

27  da 483.22 

Dr.  The  children  of  Christian  Wieder,  deceased,  to  the  said  Admrs. 

Dec.  21,  To  Cash  paid  John  Dillinger,  guardian 

1826  of  Caroline  Wieder   600.00 

Interest  to  Sept.   5,   1828,   1  yr.   1  mo. 

14  d 61.40 

Cash  paid   Henry   Meyer,   guardian   of 

Marianna  Wieder 600.00 

Interest  to  Sept.  1  yr.  8  mo.  14  d 61.40 

Cash    paid    Jacob    Deiss,    guardian    of 

Eliza  Wieder 600.00 

Interest    61.40 

May  8,  Cash    paid    John    J.    Krauss,    guardian 

Hannah  Egner   600.00 

Interest     61.40 

May  8,  Cash  paid  Silas  Wieder 850.00 

1827  Interest,  1  yr.  3  mo.  27  d 67.50 


94  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

May  8,  Cash    paid    John    J.    Krauss,    guardian 

1827  Hannah  Egner   250.00 

Interest,  1  yr.  3  mo.  27  d 19.87 

To  Cash  paid  Henry  Meyer,  guardian 

of  Marianna  Wieder 250.00 

Interest,  1  yr.  3  mo.  27  d 19.87 

May  9,  To  Cash  paid  John  Dillinger,  guardian 

1827  of  CaroHne  Wieder   250.00 

Interest  to  Sept.  5,  1828,  1  yr.  3  mo.  26  d.  19.83 

May  19,  To  Cash  paid  Jacob  Diess,  guardian  of 

1827  Eliza   Wieder    250.00 

Interest  1  yr.  3  mo.  16  d 19.41 

March  21,      Cash  paid  John  J.  Krauss,  guardian  of 

Hannah  Egner    150.00 

Interest,  5  mo.  14  d 4.10 

4400.00      396.25 
Dr.  Christian  Young  to  said  Admr, 

July  8,  60  shares   Northampton   Bank.  .     2700 

1825  20  shares  Reading  "     ..       600    3300.00 

Interest  Sept.  5,  3  yr.  27  d. 625.25 

May  24,         Cash    400.00 

1825  Interest  3  yr.  3  mo.  11  d 78.73 

Nov.  22,        Cash    10.00 

Interest,  2  yr.  9  mo.  13  d 1.67 

Sundries  bought  at  Vendue  yr.   1  mo. 

interest  thereon 1.63 


3719.35      787.38 
To  the  Honorable  the  Judges  of  the  Court  of  Lehigh, 
Approved  by  auditors 

Charles  Beitel 
Peter  Rhodes 
John  Rice 

The  final  account  was  filed  with  the  Court  July  29,  1830. 

The  Account  of  John  Strassburger  one  of  the  Administrators  of 
Andrew  Strassburger  late  of  Upper  Milford  Township  in  the  County  of 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  95 

Lehigh,  yeoman,  deceased,  Accounting  for  the  Real  Estate  sold  by  order 

of  the  Orphans'  Court. 

The  Accountant  charges  himself  with  the  monies  received  of  the 

sale  of  the  several  tracts  of  land  in  the  County  of  Lehigh  sold  by  order 

of  the  Orphans'  Court  in  the  said  respective  counties,  to  wit: 

For  the  lands  sold  in  Northampton  County. 

To  Joseph  Kock,  Bushkill  Township 245.74 

One  year's  Interest  on  half  of  said  money 7.^7      253.11 

To  Daniel  Stapp,  Lower  Mt.  Bethel 178.74 

One  year's  interest  on  J^  of  said  money 5.36       184.10 

To  Daniel  Heimback  &  Son  East  Penn 997.34 

One  year's  Interest  on  Yz  of  said  money 29.92     1027.26 

To  John  Hagenbach,  East  Penn  Wood  land. . .  83.34 

For  lands  sold  in  Bucks  County,  to  wit : 

To    Joseph    Arnold    for    land    in    Springfield 

Township     214.16 

To  Isaac  Schwartz,      do      do      Haycock  Tp.        80.62      294.78 

For  land  &c.  in  Lehigh  County,  viz: 

To  John  Nunemaker  for  lot  in  Northampton 

Borough     134.00 

To  Joseph  Mill,      do  in  Upper  Milford 197.6        331.6 

To  Jacob  Frye,      do  in  Macungie  Twp 238,32 

One  Year's  interest  on  i^  of  said  money 7.14      245.06 

To    Christian    Young    for    farm    in    Upper 

Milford     2616.32    2616.32 

5035.33 
Balance   4668.74^ 

Cr.     By  the  following  payments  made  to  the  heirs : 
By  Cash  paid  at  different  times  to  John 

Andrew  Strassburger   668.00 

By  Cash  paid  Christian  Young  in  right  of  his 

wife  Mary 668.00 

paid  Christian  Berger  in  right  of  his 

wife   Hanna    668.00    2672.00 


96  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


By  Cash  to  the  guardians  of  the  children  of 

Christian 

Wieder's  deceased  wife, 

"       "     to  Guardian  of  Hannah  Wieder.  .  . . 

133.60 

((           ((         a                   a 

"    Mary            "      .... 

133.60 

(I           <<         <(                   a 

"    Eliza            "      .... 

133.60 

(I           It           li                 a 

"     Silas       &       Corlina 

Wieder 

267.20 

668.00 

"       "      retained  as   a  like  share  p""  to  the 

other  heirs  668.00 

The  Account  further  states  that  after  the  death  of  Eve  Strass- 
burger  the  widow  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  the  following 
monies  will  be  payable  out  of  the  Real  Estate  sold  and  be  dis- 
tributed among  said  heirs,  to  wit: 

of  Christian  Young  for  the  farm  sold  him  in  Upper  Milford  1308.16 

"    Joseph  Mill             "      "  land      "       "     "        "        "  98.53 

"    Joseph  Fry           "      "       "       "       "     "    Macungie....  119.16 
"    John  Nunemaker  "      "       "       "       "     "    Northampton 

Borough    67.00 

"    Joseph  Arnold,  Bucks  County 107.10 

"    Isaac  Schwartz       "          "       40.31  147.39 

"  David   Humback,   Northampton   Co 498.97 

"  John  Hagenbach  "  "     41.67 

"  Joseph  Hock    122.87 

"  Daniel   Stapp    89.37       752.37 

2493.12 
July  29,  1830. 

On  August  7,  1833,  Eva  Strassburger  signed  an  acknowledg- 
ment that  she  had  received  of  her  son  John,  as  administrator, 
her  full  share  of  her  husband's  estate. 

Release:  Eve  Strassburger  to  John  Strassburger,  1833 

KNOW  ALL  MEN  by  these  presents  that  I  Eve  Strassburger  of 
the  Borough  of  Northampton,  County  of  Lehigh,  Commonwealth  of 
Pennsylvania,  Widow  and  Relict  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  who 
died  Intestate,  Do  hereby  acknowledge  that  I  have  this  day  received  of 
and  from  John  Strassburger,  one  of  the  administrators  of  the  said  Andrew 


'r* 


THE   STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  9/ 

■rfi'^burg-cr,    1' .:•,••  c.'  i   rf    Fvy-o  thousand    four  hundred  and 

eight  c'-  ;:  made  up  of  the  balance  of  the 

:■«.  Strassburg-er,  one 

ioo  deductmg  from 

■  eighty  dollars  and 

and  eighty- 

/•  stxan  and 


cert<  "•■  thf't 


^Mi  John  Strassburger,  sir!'. punting  t' 


eight  <  >  m  fvli*i:\.  -ient  of  all  such 

s'-  ■'   -ctiuni  ■■:■■  -tids,  v/hich 

o>ving-  I.  ,   -  .   ;   -  -.       -ed  husband 

'V  Strassburc^er  aforesuM,  "^mf  only  as  had  come  into  the  hands 

'■;tstr3.tors  to  vv^,  ^h-:  liands  of  John  Strassburger,  one 

•.    ,.    ,v.;rs  of  the  afo^-sgid  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased, 

le'Tving  ;^till  the  sums  in  t!ie  hancvc^  iohu  Engleman,  and  due  me  to  be 

pakl  hereafter..    AND  I  there forfi^i^^  •".:.^::  Eve  Strassburger  do  by  these 

presenti'  re;-  ';'jit  and  .forevtS'v^f^cr t!  ..e  the  said  John  Strassburger 

■''ie  of  the  ralors  and  him  on^'  hr--  hens,  executors,  administrators 

•  from  tne  said  sum,  being:  th^jalance  of  my  one  thirds  out  of  the 

'  '■  '      '       ^    so  ^^  as  had  come  into  hi^  hands  only 

■  id  S\6    from  all  action  suits  payments 

and  deiJKir;  is   '.vhatsoever  for  or  by  reason 

^  '    '  irom  tile  hegin- 

:M:s..     IN  WIT- 

•  .  t  her  hand  and 

.u   l>ord  One  thoa- 


1  Misi:eIIane( 


I 


5»  •£» 


.^ 


1^ 


■V.  ,.    .  J         6^ 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  97 

Strassburger,  deceased,  the  sum  o.f  Two  thousand  four  hundred  and 
eighty-eight  dollars  and  sixty  cents  being  made  up  of  the  balance  of  the 
accounts  in  part  due  me  and  to  be  paid  by  the  said  John  Strassburger,  one 
of  the  administrators  as  follows,  in  the  first  distribution  deducting  from 
the  balance  due  me  of  two  thousand  five  hundred  and  eighty  dollars  and 
eighty-eight  cents  the  sum  of  two  hundred  and  eight  dollars  and  eighty- 
four  cents  and  the  further  sum  of  thirty-one  dollars  and  twenty  seven  and 
three  quarters  cents  due  me  in  the  hands  of  John  Engleman,  one  of  the 
administrators  and  still  unpaid  which  leaves  of  that  aforesaid  two  thou- 
sand three  hundred  and  forty-six  dollars  seventy-six  and  three  quarters 
cents  which  added  to  that  part  of  the  balance  in  their  last  account,  which 
is  due  me  and  in  the  hands  of  the  said  John  Strassburger,  amounting  to 
the  sum  of  one  hundred  and  forty-one  dollars  and  eighty-four  cents,  mak- 
ing together  the  aforesaid  sum  of  two  thousand  four  hundred  and  eighty- 
eight  dollars  and  sixty  cents  in  full  satisfaction  and  payment  of  all  such 
sum  or  sums  of  money,  share  or  shares  purports  and  dividends,  which 
were  due  and  owing  to  me  out  of  the  estate  of  my  deceased  husband 
Andrew  Strassburger  aforesaid,  so  far  only  as  had  come  into  the  hands 
of  one  of  the  administrators  to  wit,  the  hands  of  John  Strassburger,  one 
of  the  administrators  of  the  aforesaid  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased, 
leaving  still  the  sums  in  the  hands  of  John  Engleman,  and  due  me  to  be 
paid  hereafter.  AND  I  therefore  the  said  Eve  Strassburger  do  by  these 
presents  release  acquit  and  .forever  discharge  the  said  John  Strassburger 
one  of  the  administrators  and  him  only  his  heirs,  executors,  administrators 
of  and  from  the  said  sum,  being  the  balance  of  my  one  thirds  out  of  the 
estate  of  my  deceased  husband,  so  far  as  had  come  into  his  hands  only 
and  from  all  share  and  dividend  and  from  all  action  suits  payments 
accounts  recovering  claims  and  demands  whatsoever  for  or  by  reason 
thereof  or  of  any  other  matter  cause  or  thing  whatsoever  from  the  begin- 
ning of  the  world  to  the  day  of  the  date  of  these  presents.  IN  WIT- 
NESS whereof  the  said  Eve  Strassburger  has  hereunto  set  her  hand  and 
seal  dated  the  seventh  day  of  August  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  One  thou- 
sand eight  hundred  and  thirty-three,  1833.^ 

her 
Signed  Sealed  and  Delivered  Eve    X    Strassburger 

in  the  presence  of  us  mark 

Charles  Seip 

Samuel  Runk 

Acknowledged  26  March,  1834. 


1  Miscellaneous  Book  No.  3,  p.  15.     Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


98  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Christian  Young,  who  had  purchased  the  homestead  farm 
in  Upper  Milford  Township  of  the  administrators,  removed  to 
Berks  County,  Pennsylvania.  Before  leaving  Lehigh  County  he 
sold  the  property  in  two  different  tracts,  one  to  Jacob  Shuler  and 
the  other  to  John  William  Brunner.  Christian  Young  died  in 
Berks  County.  In  order  to  secure  the  full  right  and  title  of  these 
purchasers  to  the  homestead  farm,  all  the  heirs  of  Andrew  Strass- 
burger,  in  1835,  signed  a  deed  of  release  quit-claiming  to  the  said 
Peter  Shuler  and  John  William  Brunner  all  their  right  to  this  land. 

Release:  John  Strassburger  et  al  to  Jacob  Shuler  et  al,  1835 

TO  ALL  PEOPLE  TO  WHOM  THESE  PRESENTS  SHALL 
COME  John  Strasburger  and  John  Andrew  Strasburger,  the  sons  of 
Andrew  Strasburger  late  of  Lehigh  County,  deceased,  John  Engleman 
intermarried  with  Mary  Strasburger,  Christian  Berger  intermarried  with 
Hannah  Strasburger  and  Jacob  Hartzel  intermarried  with  Catharina  the 
said  Maria,  Hannah  and  Catharina  being  daughters  of  said  deceased  and 
Silas  Wieder,  Adam  Wieder,  guardian  of  Mary  Wieder,  Willoby  Gobel 
intermarried  with  Eliza  Wieder,  John  Stabler  intermarried  with  Caro- 
line Wieder  and  Thomas  Egner  intermarried  with  Hannah  Wieder,  the 
said  Silas,  Mary,  Eliza,  Catharina  and  Hannah  are  the  children  of  Chris- 
tiana one  of  the  daughters  of  Andrew  Gangwer  (Strasburger?  deceased, 
SEND  GREETING  WHEREAS  John  Strasburger  and  John  Engleman, 
administrators  of  all  and  singular  the  goods  and  chattels,  rights  and 
credits  which  were  of  Andrew  Strasburger,  deceased,  at  the  time  of  his 
death  who  died  intestate  did  by  virtue  of  an  order  of  the  Orphans'  Court 
of  Lehigh  County,  sell  to  Christian  Young  a  certain  part  of  the  Real 
Estate  of  Andrew  Strasburger,  deceased,  the  proceedings  in  said  court 
and  the  deed  of  John  Strasburger  and  John  Engleman,  administrators 
aforesaid,  will  more  fully  appear  subject  nevertheless  to  a  certain  dower 
therein  mentioned  AND  WHEREAS  the  said  Christian  Young  has  since 
died  having  made  his  last  Will  and  Testament  which  has  since  been  duly 
approved  before  the  Register  of  Berks  County  in  which  said  last  Will  and 
Testament  he  did  constitute  and  appoint  Jacob  Clymer  and  Jacob  Heistand 
his  Executors  who  by  virtue  of  the  power  invested  in  them  did  by  their 
Indenture  made  the  third  day  of  April  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thou- 
sand eight  hundred  and  thirty-five,  convey  unto  Jacob  Shuler  of  Upper 
Milford  Township,  Lehigh  County  one  hundred  and  three  acres  and  one 
hundred  sixteen  perches  being  part  of  the  real  estate  of  the  said  deceased 
situate  in  Upper  Milford  Township  adjoining  lands  of  William  Brunner, 
Daniel  Stabler,  Abraham  Shuler  and  others,  subject  nevertheless  to  the 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  99 

payment  of  an  annual  interest  of  thirty  five  dollars  and  forty  two  cents 
payable  unto  Eve  Strasburger  the  widow  of  Andrew  Strasburger, 
deceased,  during  her  natural  life  and  immediately  after  her  death  the  sum 
of  five  hundred  and  ninety  dollars  and  forty  six  cents  unto  the  heirs  and 
legal  representatives  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased.  NOW  THESE 
PRESENTS  WITNESSETH  that  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  ninety 
eight  dollars  and  forty  one  cents  to  each  of  us  who  take  per  capita  and 
the  same  sum  to  us  collectively  who  take  stirpes  being  the  heirs  and  legal 
representatives  of  Andrew  Strasburger,  deceased,  the  receipt  whereof 
each  one  who  has  hereunto  affixed  his  hand  and  seal  acknowledges  to 
have  received  for  himself  and  not  for  the  rest.  And  therefore  each  for 
himself  and  not  for  the  rest  of  them  DOTH  hereby  release  and  forever 
quitclaim  unto  said  Christian  Young  and  his  heirs,  all  the  estate  right 
title  interest  trust  and  claim  and  demand  whatsoever  both  at  law  and  in 
equity  of  each  of  us  who  has  signed  this  release  only  for  himself  and 
none  other  of  into  or  out  of  all  and  singular  the  said  one  hundred  and 
seven  acres  and  one  hundred  and  forty  six  perches  aforesaid  so  that 
neither  of  us  whose  names  are  hereunto  subscribed  their  heirs  or  assigns 
or  any  other  person  or  persons  in  trust  for  him  or  them  or  in  his  or  their 
name  or  names,  or  in  the  names  rights  or  stead  of  any  of  them  shall  or 
will,  can  or  may  by  any  way  or  means  whatsoever  hereafter  have  claim 
challenge  or  demand  any  right  title  or  interest  in  to  or  out  of  the  same 
land,  but  that  the  said  heirs  and  legal  representatives  aforesaid  whose 
names  are  hereunto  subscribed  their  heirs  and  assigns  and  every  of  them 
from  all  estate  right  title  interest  property  claim  or  demand  of  in  to  or 
out  of  the  same  lands  and  premises  or  any  part  of  them  as  in  and  shall 
be  by  these  presents  forever  excluded  and  debarred.  In  witness  whereof 
we  the  said  heirs  and  legal  representatives  of  Andrew  Strassburger 
deceased  here  each  for  himself  only  and  not  for  the  rest  hereunto  set  his 
hand  and  seal,  dated  the  seventeenth  day  of  December  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty  five.^ 

John    Strassburger 
Signed  Sealed  and  j.  A.  Strassburger 

Delivered  in  the  presence  John  Engleman 

^^  ^s  Christian  Berger 

Samuel  Runk  Jacob  Hartzel 

Jacob  Stein  Samuel  T.  Wieder 

Adam  Wieder 
Willable  Goble 
John  Stahler 
Thomas  Egner 

1  Miscellaneous  Book  1,  p.  79.     Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


100  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Release:  Heirs  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  Deceased, 
TO  John  William  Brunner,  1835 

TO  ALL  PEOPLE  to  whom  these  presents  shall  come  John  Strass- 
burger,  Andrew  Strassburger,  the  sons  of  Andrew  Strassburger, 
deceased,  late  of  Lehigh  County,  John  Engleman,  intermarried  with 
Mary  Strassburger,  Christian  Berger,  intermarried  with  Hannah  Strass- 
burger, Jacob  Hartzel  intermarried  with  Catharina,  the  said  Mary, 
Hannah  and  Catharina  being  daughters  o.f  the  said  deceased,  and  Silas 
Wieder,  Adam  Wieder,  guardian  of  Mary  Wieder,  Willoby  Gobel  inter- 
married with  Eliza  Wieder,  John  Stabler  intermarried  with  Caroline 
Wieder  and  Thomas  Egner  intermarried  with  Hannah  Wieder,  the  said 
Silas,  Mary,  Eliza,  Caroline  and  Hannah  are  the  children  of  Christina 
one  of  the  daughters  of  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  send 
Greeting:  WHEREAS  John  Strassburger  and  John  Engleman  adminis- 
trators of  all  and  singular  the  goods,  chattels,  rights  and  credits  which 
were  of  Andrew  Strassburger  deceased,  at  the  time  of  his  death,  who  died 
intestate,  did  by  virtue  of  an  order  of  the  Orphans'  Court  of  Lehigh 
County,  sell  to  Christian  Young  a  certain  part  of  the  real  estate  of 
Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  as  by  the  proceedings  of  the  said  court 
and  the  deed  of  the  said  John  Strassburger  and  John  Engleman,  the 
administrators  aforesaid,  dated  December  24,  A.  D.  1828,  will  more  fully 
appear,  Subject  nevertheless  to  a  certain  dower  therein  mentioned.  AND 
WHEREAS  the  said  Christian  Young  and  Catherine  his  wife  by  their 
Indenture  bearing  date  the  first  day  of  April  A.  D.  1831,  for  the  consid- 
eration therein  mentioned  did  convey  unto  said  John  William  Brunner  of 
Upper  Milford  Township,  Lehigh  County,  One  hundred  and  seven  acres 
one  hundred  and  forty-six  perches,  being  part  of  the  real  estate  of  the 
said  deceased  situate  in  Upper  Milford,  Lehigh  County,  adjoining  lands 
of  John  William  Brunner,  Christian  Young,  Andrew  Engleman  and 
others,  subject  to  the  payment  of  the  annual  interest  of  thirty-six  dollars 
and  .fourteen  cents  being  a  proportionable  part  $78  and  48c  payable  unto 
Eve  Strassburger,  the  widow  of  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  during 
her  natural  life  and  at  and  immediately  after  her  decease,  the  sum  of  six 
hundred  and  two  dollars  and  thirty-six  cents  unto  the  heirs  and  legal 
representatives  of  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  and  to  each 
of  them  their  respective  part  of  the  same.  NOW  THESE  PRESENTS 
WITNESSETH  that  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  one  hundred  dollars 
and  thirty-nine  cents  and  one  sixth  of  a  cent,  to  each  of  us  who  take  per 
capita  and  the  same  sum  to  us  collectively,  who  take  by  the  stirpes  being 
the  heirs  of  the  said  Andrew  Strassburger,  deceased,  the  receipt  whereof 
each  one  who  has  hereunto  affixed  his  hand  and  seal  acknowledges  to 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  101 

have  received  for  himself  and  not  for  the  rest  AND  THEREFORE  each 
for  himself  and  not  for  the  rest  of  any  of  them  DOTH  hereby  release  and 
forever  quitclaim  unto  said  John  William  Brunner  and  his  heirs  all  the 
estate,  right,  title,  interest,  trust  claim  and  demand  whatsoever,  both  at 
law  and  in  equity  of  each  of  us  who  has  signed  this  release  only  for 
himself  and  none  other  of  into  or  out  of  all  and  singular  the  said  one  hun- 
dred and  seven  acres  and  one  hundred  and  forty-six  perches  aforesaid  so 
that  neither  of  us  whose  names  are  hereunto  subscribed  their  heirs  or 
assigns  or  any  other  person  or  persons  in  trust  for  him  or  them  or  in  his 
or  their  name  or  names,  or  in  the  names  right  and  stead  of  any  of  them 
shall  or  will  or  can  or  may  by  any  way  or  means  whatsoever,'  hereafter 
have  claim  challenge  or  demand  any  right  title  or  interest  in  to  or  out  of 
the  same  land,  but  that  the  said  heirs  and  legal  representatives  aforesaid 
whose  names  are  hereunto  subscribed  their  heirs  and  assigns  and  every 
o.f  them  from  all  estate  right  title  interest  property  claim  or  demand  of  in 
to  or  out  of  the  same  lands  and  premises  or  any  part  of  them  as  is  and 
shall  be  by  these  presents  forever  excluded  and  debarred.     IN  WIT- 
NESS whereof  we  the  said  heirs  and  legal  representatives  of  Andrew 
Strassburger,  deceased,  have  each  for  himself  only  and  not  for  the  rest 
hereunto  set  his  hand  and  seal,  dated  the  seventeenth  day  of  December  in 
the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty-five.^ 
Signed,  Sealed  and  Delivered 

John  Strassburger 
m  the  presence  of  us  j.  a.  Strassburger 

Samuel  Runk  John  Engleman 

Jacob  Stein.  .  Christian  Berger 

Jacob  Hartzel 
Saul  T.  Wieder 
Adam  Wieder 
Willable  Gobel 
John  Stahler 
Thomas  Egner 

After  the  death  of  her  husband  and  the  sale  of  the  home- 
stead and  farm  in  Upper  Milford,  Eva  Strassburger  removed  to 
the  Borough  of  Northampton,  or  Allentown,  as  it  was  later  called 
where  she  purchased  a  house  and  lot  on  the  north  side  of  Union 
Street.'  On  the  southeast  corner  of  Union  and  Lehigh  Streets 
stood  a  large  frame  building  owned  and  occupied  by  her  eldest 

1  Miscellaneous  Book  No.  1,  p.  16.    Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 
Deed  Book  9,  p.  830.     Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


102  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

son,  John  Strassburger.  This  building  was  later  remodeled  and 
used  as  a  hotel  until  very  recently.  Union  Street  lies  along  the 
side  of  the  hill  upon  which  Allentown  stands,  and  Lehigh  Street 
takes  a  sharp  decline  at  this  point,  running  down  to  the  Little 
Lehigh  River,  which  it  crosses  by  means  of  a  low  wooden  bridge. 
In  the  angle  formed  by  the  river  and  street  lay  a  tract  of  land 
which  Andrew  Strassburger  had  purchased  in  1823,  and  which 
his  administrators,  in  1827,  sold  to  John  Nunnemacker.'  It  is 
quite  likely  that  the  house  owned  and  occupied  by  Eva  Strass- 
burger, and  in  which  she  died,  was  situated  somewhere  in  this 
immediate  neighborhood. 

Eva  Strassburger  died  of  dropsy,  July  16,  1835,  aged  over 
eighty  years.  On  December  9,  1831,  she  signed  a  will  in  which 
she  names  her  "trusty  friend  John  Rice,  Esq.,  sole  executor,"  and 
bequeaths  to  her  children  and  grandchildren  all  her  stocks,  bonds, 
etc.  On  March  11,  1835,  a  codicil  was  added  in  which  she  re- 
quests that  her  executor  sell  the  house  and  lot  on  Union  Street  and 
divide  the  proceeds  equally  among  her  heirs. 

Will  of  Eva  Strassburger,  1835 

In  the  Name  of  God  Amen  I  Eve  Strassburger,  now  in  the  Borough 
of  Northampton  in  the  County  of  Lehigh  in  the  State  of  Pennsylvania, 
Widow,  being  in  good  health  of  body  and  of  sound  mind  and  Memory 
and  understanding  (blessed  be  God  for  the  same)  but  considering  the 
uncertainty  of  this  transitory  life  Do  Make  and  publish  this  my  last  Will 
and  Testament  in  Manner  and  form  following  to  wit,  first  it  is  my  wish 
that  all  my  just  debts  and  funeral  expenses  be  duly  paid  and  satisfied. 
Item  unto  my  daughter  Hannah  Bieger  I  give  and  bequeath  twenty  five 
shares  in  Capital  or  joint  stock  of  the  Northampton  Bank.  Unto  each  of 
my  Children  of  my  deceased  daughter  Christina  Weider  I  give  and 
bequeath  five  shares  in  the  aforesaid  Capital  or  joint  stock  of  the 
Northampton  Bank  to  be  transferred  to  them  respectively  by  the  execu- 
tors hereinafter  named  as  soon  after  my  decease  as  conveniently  be  done. 
An  all  the  rest  of  my  Estate  goods  Chattels  Bank  Stock  monies  and 
effects  Whatsoever  I  may  die  Possessed  of  or  may  be  entitled  at  the  time 
of  my  decease  after  my  just  debts  and  funeral  expenses  be  duly  paid  and 
satisfied  *  *  *  I  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  five  Children  John  Strass- 


1  Deed  Book  10,  p.  211.     Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


Doorway  to  Parsonage  at  Perkasie,  and  some  of  its  furnishing 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  103 

burger,  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  Catherine  Young,  Maria  Engle- 
man,  and  Hannah  Berger  and  my  before  named  five  Grandchildren 
Silas  Weider,  Hannah  Egner,  Caroline  Stabler,  Eliza  Weider  and 
Mary  Weider  in  sixe  equal  parts  and  shares  so  that  each  of  my  said 
five  children  draw  one  share  and  my  said  five  grandchildren  jointly  the 
sixth  share  equally  to  be  divided  among  them.  And  lastly  I  do  hereby 
nominate  constitute  and  appoint  my  trusty  friend  John  Rice  esq.  of  the 
Borough  of  Northampton  aforesaid  to  be  the  sole  Executor  of  this  my 
Will  hereby  revoking  all  former  Wills  Legacies  and  Bequests  by  me 
heretofore  made  and  declaring  this  and  no  other  to  be  my  last  Will  and 
Testament.  IN  WITNESS  whereof  I  the  said  Eve  Strassburger  have 
hereunto  set  my  hand  and  seal  the  ninth  day  o.f  December  one  thousand 
eight  hundred  and  thirty  one. 

her 
Signed  Sealed  Published  and  declared        Eve   X   Strassburger 
by  the  said  Testator  as  her  last  Will  mark 

and  Testament  in  the  presence  of  us 

Edward  Rhodes 

Peter  Rhodes 

I  Eve  Strassburger  of  the  Borough  of  Northampton  in  the  County 
of  Lehigh,  State  of  Pennsylvania,  widow,  Do  this  eleventh  day  of  March 
Anno  Dom  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty  five  make  and  Publish 
this  Codicil  to  my  last  Will  and  Testament  in  manner  following  that  is  to 
say  it  is  my  will  that  the  Messuage  and  lot  of  ground  which  I  have  lately 
purchased  situate  on  the  South  side  of  Union  Street  in  the  Borough  of 
Northampton  aforesaid  bounded  on  the  East  Side  by  a.  lot  of  Joseph 
Hartman  on  the  South  by  a  public  alley  west  by  a  lot  occupied  by  Francis 
Gross  on  the  north  by  Union  Street  shall  be  sold  at  Public  vendue  outcry 
for  the  best  price  that  can  be  obtained  for  the  same  by  my  Executors 
named  in  the  will  to  which  this  Codicil  is  annexed  and  I  do  hereby 
empower  and  authorize  my  Executors  to  sign  seal  Execute  and  deliver 
good  and  sufficient  deeds  of  conveyance  in  fee  simple  to  the  purchaser  or 
purchasers  of  the  same  and  the  proceeds  of  the  said  house  and  lot  It  is 
my  will  shall  be  divided  to  and  among  my  Children  and  Grand  Children 
in  the  same  manner  and  in  the  same  proportion  as  I  have  willed  and 
directed  my  residuary  Estate  to  be  divided  in  my  said  will.  And  whereas 
in  and  by  the  said  last  Will  and  Testament  I  have  given  and  bequeathed 
unto  my  daughter  Catherine  Young  one  sixth  part  of  my  residuary 
Estate  whatsoever  I  might  die  possessed  of.  Now  I  do  hereby  order 
and  declare  that  my  will  is  that  only  the  dividend  of  the  Bank  stock  and 
the  interest  of  the  monies  and  effects  which  shall  come  be  her  share  as 


104  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

well  as  the  interest  only  of  her  share  of  the  house  and  lot  above  directed 
shall  be  paid  to  her  the  dividend  of  the  Bank  stock  semi  annually  and  the 
interest  annually  during  the  term  of  her  natural  life  and  from  and  after 
her  decease  the  Principal  monies  aforesaid  and  Bank  Stock  shall  go  to 
and  be  equally  divided  to  and  among  her  young  children  by  her  late  hus- 
band Christian  Young  and  their  legal  representatives  in  equal  parts  and 
shares.  IN  WITNESS  whereof  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and  seal 
this  eleventh  day  of  March  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight 
hundred  and  thirty  five/ 

her 
Witnesses:  Eve  X  Strassburger 

Jacob  Stein  mark 

Andrew  Klotz 

Proved  July  29,  1835. 

Several  mistakes  have  occurred  both  as  to  the  date  of  birth 
of  Eva  (Yeager)  Strassburger  and  her  age  at  the  time  of  death. 
According  to  the  record  of  baptisms  appearing  upon  the  register 
of  the  New  Hanover  Lutheran  Church,  in  Montgomery  County, 
she  was  born  November  24,  1754,  and  baptized  December  25, 
following;  while  the  tombstone  inscription  states  she  was  born  in 
September,  1752,  and  died  July  16,  1835,  aged  82  years,  10  months 
and  15  days.  Assuming  that  the  baptismal  register  is  correct,  as 
we  have  no  authentic  family  record  to  confirm  the  tombstone  in- 
scription, Eva  Strassburger  died  at  the  age  of  80  years,  7  months 
and  22  days.  The  following  notice  of  her  death  appeared  in  the 
"Repiihlikaner,"  a  German  newspaper  published  in  Allentown, 
under  date  of  July  23,  1835:  "Died  last  Thursday  afternoon,  in 
this  town,  of  dropsy,  Mrs.  Eva  Strassburger,  widow  of  the  late 
Andreas  Strassburger,  aged  81  years  10  months  and  15  days.  On 
last  Sunday  occurred  her  burial  when  Rev.  Jaeger  preached  a 
powerful  sermon." 

Rev.  John  Conrad  Yeager,  pastor  of  the  St.  Paul's  Lutheran 
Church  at  Allentown,  of  whose  congregation  she  was  a  member, 
but  who  was  in  no  way  related,  entered  upon  his  private  docket 
the  following:  "Buried  July  16,  1835,  Eva  Strassburger,  aged 
87.  10.  15.'" 


1  Will  Book  No.  2,  p.  175.     Allentown,  Pa. 

2  Memoirs  of  John  Conrad  Yeager,  p.  34. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  105 

Besides  holding  a  number  of  the  shares  in  the  Northampton 
Bank,  which  had  come  to  her  as  part  of  her  husband's  estate, 
Eva  Strassburger  had  purchased  considerable  stock  in  the  Water 
Works,  when  that  project  was  brought  before  the  people.  Prior  to 
1829  all  the  drinking  water  of  the  borough  was  obtained  from 
three  or  four  deep  wells,  as  the  majority  of  the  people  could  not 
afford  the  cost  of  digging  to  the  necessary  depth  of  one  hundred 
feet  or  more.  Most  of  the  water  was  hauled  by  teams  from  the 
Jordon,  or  Little  Lehigh,  and  peddled  about  the  town.  Some  of  the 
residents  of  the  borough,  seeing  the  importance  of  obtaining  a  good 
water  supply,  took  measures  to  bring  about  the  desired  result. 
An  act  of  Legislature  authorizing  the  organization  of  a  water 
company  was  approved  February  13,  1816,  but  it  was  not  until 
1825  that  anything  definite  was  accomplished.  On  March  25 
of  that  year  commissioners  were  appointed  to  effect  the  raising 
of  stock,  and  subscriptions  were  placed  at  $10.00  per  share,  and 
among  the  first  subscribers  was  John  Strassburger,  her  son,  who 
took  ten  shares.  Later  lists  have  not  been  preserved,  but  by  1829 
there  were  1029  subscribers,  making  the  stock  of  the  company 
$10,400.00.  The  organization  was  known  as  the  Northampton 
Water  Company,  and  they  used  the  water  from  a  spring  near  the 
Little  Lehigh,  since  called  Silver  or  Crystal  Spring.^  Some  time 
prior  to  her  death  she  had  acquired  a  number  of  shares  in  this 
company.  An  inventory  and  appraisement  of  her  goods  and 
chattels  made  in  July  23,  1835,  shows  that  her  entire  estate  was 
valued  at  $8246.15.  Among  the  personal  articles  mentioned  was 
a  German  Family  Bible.  Unfortunately,  it  is  not  known  what 
became  of  this  book,  nor  what  was  the  final  disposition  of  the 
large  chest  and  eight-day  clock  named  among  her  personal  be- 
longings.^ 

Inventory 

A  true  and  perfect  Inventory  and  Just  Appraisement  o.f  the  goods 
Chattels  rights  and  Credits  which  were  of  Eve  Strassburger  late  of  the 
Borough  of  Northampton  in  the  County  of  Lehigh,  widow,  deceased,  at 
the  time  of  her  death,  to  wit : 


1  Charles  R.  Roberts,  History  of  Lehigh  County,  Pennsylvania,  Volume  I,  p.  432. 

2  Original    Papers    No.    1289,    Office    of    the    Register    of    Wills.     Allentown, 
Pennsylvania. 


106  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Cash  in  Silver  Notes 1275 

Bonds,  Christian  Seif  for 100.00 

Jacob  Miller,  John  Newhard,  J.  Rice 150.00 

Note  on  Demand,  John  Strassburger,  Note 305.00 

Catherine  Young 200.00 

Bank  Stock,  96  Shares  of  Northampton  Bank  at  $60  per  Share  5760.00 

Northampton  Water  Stock,  14  shares  at  10  per  share 140.00 

Wearing  Apparel    8.00 

Bed  and  Bed  Stead 14.00 

do            do            6.00 

7  Chairs  at  25 1.75 

1  Rocking  Chair   .50 

1  Stove  pipe    8.00 

1  Large  Chest   1.00 

1  Small     do       50 

8  day  Clock  Case 20.00 

1  small    looking    glass .12J/2 

1  German   Family   Bible 2.00 

1  Prayer  and  Hymn  Book .25 

1  small  Breakfast  Table 1.50 

1  Kitchen   Dresser    2.00 

2  sad  Irons .25 

1  small   Brass   Kettle 2.00 

1  lot  of  tin  Ware  6  p 62^ 

2  Skillets    50 

1  Sand  box  Earthen  Ware .50 

1  pr.  Tongs  Cabbage  Cutter  &  Umbrella 1.25 

Queens   Ware .60 

Spinning  Wheel  and  Washing  Machine .25 

Scrubbing  Brush  and  White  Wash  Brush .50 

3  sheets,                        50               1.50 

4  Table   Cloths    1.50 

lot  of   Towels 2.00 

3  Empty  Bags   .75 

1  Blanket  and  two  Coverlids 1.50 

Bottles  and  glasses .25 

lot  of   Carpeting 3.00 

Box  and  Walking  Stick .12^4 

1  Water  Bucket  Cabbage  and  Wash  Tub 1.50 

1  pot  Hook  and  Dripping  pan .01 

$6752.985^ 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  107 

Taken  and  appraised  by  us  the  subscribers,  this  twenty-eighth  day 
of  July,  A.  D.  1835. 

J.    F.   RUHE 

Jacob    Stein. 

As  the  will,  or  codicil,  directed  that  the  house  and  lot  on 
Union  Street  should  be  sold,  John  Rice,  as  executor,  disposed  of 
the  premises  to  one  Joseph  Seider  for  $950.00  and  as  executor 
signed  in  his  name,  the  following  deed: 

Deed:  John  Rice,  Executor  of  Eve  Strassburger, 
Deceased,  to  Joseph  Seider,  1836 

C^i)i0  JInDCntUtC  Made  the  second  day  of  April  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty-six  Between  John  Rice, 
executor  of  the  last  Will  and  Testament  of  Eve  Strassburger,  late  of  the 
Borough  of  Northampton,  in  the  County  of  Lehigh  and  State  of  Penn- 
sylvania, widow,  of  the  one  part,  and  Joseph  Seider  of  Upper  Saucon 
Township  in  the  County  and  State  aforesaid,  yeoman,  of  the  other  part. 
WHEREAS  the  said  Eve  Strassburger  on  the  ninth  day  of  December 
one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty-one  made  her  last  Will  and  Testa- 
ment in  writing  and  appointed  the  said  John  Rice  executor  thereof,  AND 
whereas  afterwards  by  force  and  virtue  of  divers  good  conveyances  the 
said  Eve  Strassburger  became  lawfully  seized  in  her  demesne  as  of  fee 
of  and  in  a  certain  messuage  and  tract  of  land  situate  in  the  Borough  of 
Northampton  and  being  so  seized  thereof  did  on  the  eleventh  day  of 
March,  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty-five  make  an  publish  a 
codicil  to  the  said  last  Will  and  Testament  wherein  and  whereby  amongst 
other  things  she  ordered  that  the  said  messuage  and  lot  of  ground  should 
be  sold  by  her  executor  named  in  the  will  to  which  the  codicil  is  attached. 
Now  this  Indenture  Witnesseth  that  the  said  John  Rice  aforesaid  for  and 
in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  nine  hundred  and  fifty  dollars  hath  granted 
bargained  sold  released  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Joseph  Seider  all  the 
above  mentioned  and  described  messuage  and  lot  of  ground  situate  on  the 
north  side  of  Union  Street  TO  HAVE  AND  TO  HOLD  the  said  mes- 
suage and  lot  of  ground  unto  the  said  Joseph  Seider  his  heirs  and  assigns 
to  the  only  proper  use  and  behoof  of  the  said  Joseph  Seider.  In  trust 
howsoever  for  the  sole  and  separate  use  and  benefit  and  behoof  o.f  Eliza- 
beth Cooper  late  Elizabeth  Seider  sister  of  said  Joseph  Seider  and  her 
heirs   *  *  *    In  Witness  whereof  the  parties  to  these  presents  have  here- 


108  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

unto  interchangeably  set  their  hands  and  seals  dated  the  day  and  year 
first  above  written.^ 

John  Rice 

A  final  account  of  the  stewardship  was  rendered  to  the 
Register  of  Wills  by  the  executor,  April  17,  1837,  and  the  settle- 
ment of  the  estate  of  Eva  Strassburger  was  closed. 

The  account  of  John  Rice  Executor  of  the  Estate  of  Eve  Strass- 
burger widow  of  Andrew  Strassburger  late  of  the  County  of  Lehigh, 

The  said  accountant  charges  himself  with  all  and  singular 
the  goods  and  chattels  rights  and  credits  which  were  of  the 
said  deceased  as  per  Inventory  filed  in  the  Register's  Office  in 
the  County  of  Lehigh,  amounting  to 6752.98 

To  advance  on  the  goods  at  public  sale 15.71 

Cash  from  different  persons 36.03 

interest  on  Dowery 3.03         39.16 

Cash  received  from  Jacob  Miller,  Interest  on  his  Bond  6.40 

Advance  on  4  shares  of  Northampton  Bank  Stock  beyond 

appraisement    23.50 

deduct    therefrom    loss    in    2    shares    of    Northampton 

Water  Company  Stock 2.00        21.50 

Cash  received  Dividend  on  96  share  of  Northampton 

Bank  Stock  declared  May  1835 192. 

November,    1835    192. 

do     do    on  14  shares,  May,  1836  28. 

"      "      "       "        November,  1836  28. 

—      440.00 

Cash  received  from  House  and  Lot  sold  agreeably  to 

will  of  the  deceased 950.00 

Cash  received  on  dividend  Northampton  Water  Com- 
pany stock  8  4Q 

Interest  due  on  C.  Leeper's  Bond  2  years  up  to  April, 

^^^^    12.00 


$8246.15 
The  said  Accountant  craves  allowance  for  disbursements  made  out 
of  the  Estate  aforesaid  as  follows : 


1  Deed  Book  No.  9,  p.  830.    Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  109 

Cash  paid  John   Wilson,  Register 5.60 

"      John   Strassburger,    funeral   expenses....  53.55 

"     Joseph  Young,  "  "         ....  24.93 

"      Dr.  John  Romig,  ac 7.50 

"      John  Strassburger  for  William  Geisinger  1.95 

"      George  Schmidt   -31 

"      Caspar   Newhard,  taxes 7.55 

"      C.  H.  Snyder,  Corporation  Taxes 1.50 

"      George  Schmidt    .50 

"      John     Strassburger,     House     rent,     fuel, 

attendance  13  months  up  to  Nov.  1,  1835  150.00 

"      John  Dunlap   11-06 

"      Andrew  Klotz 4.65 

"      George   Henry    10.00 

"      J.  D.  Cesentraun  for  tombstone 45.00 

"     Jacob  Stein   2.00 

"      C.  W.  Hutter   4.00 

"      D.   Stetter    1-25 

"     A.  &  W.  Blumer 3.00 

"      John  I.  Ruhe    1-00 

"      Charles  Davis  fee 345.35         10.00 

"      Catherine  Hartzel  Amount  o.f  Dividend  on 
7  Bank  Shares  in  May  and  November, 

1836    28.00 

Amount  of  Dividend  on  7  share   do  to  pay   Maria 

Engleman 28.00 

By  25  shares  of  Northampton  Bank  stock  appraised 
and   inventories   at  $60   a   share  transferred   to 

Hannah  Berger,  a  special  legacy 1500. 

By  25  shares  of  do  do  transferred  to  the  heirs  of 

Christina  Wieder,  deceased,  a  special  legacy 1500. 

By  42  shares  of  do  do  transferred  to  the  different 
heirs  agreeably  to  the  last  will  of  the  deceased  as 
follows : 

J.  A.  Strassburger,  7  shares 420. 

John    Strassburger  "      "       420. 

Catherine  Hartzel    "       "       retained  for  her 

uses     420. 

Hannah  Berger,  7  shares 420. 

Maria  Engleman,  7  shares 420. 

Christina    Wieder,    deceased,    her    heirs,    7 

shares    420. 


no  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

By  12  shares  of  Northampton  Water  Company  stock 

to  be  transferred  2  shares  to  each 120.         5640.00 


On  account  compensation  setthng  estate 150.00 

By  Register  fees 8.00 

Balance 2046.80 


$8246.15 


April  17,  1837. 

John  Rice. 

Eva  Strassburger  was  buried  beside  her  husband,  Andrew, 
and  their  daughter,  Anna  Christina,  wife  of  Adam  Wieder,  who 
had  died  two  years  before  the  father.  The  tombstone  inscriptions 
are  in  German;  the  English  translations  are  here  given/ 

Here  lies 

in  the  hope  of  a  blessed  resurrection 

Johann  Andreas 

Strassburger 

He  was  born  in  Europe 

the  24  January  1754  came 

to  America  in  year  1769 

lived  in  wedlock  45  years 

with  Eva,  who  was  born  Jagerin 

begat  7  children,  2  sons  and  5  daughters 

and  died  the  27  April  1825 

at  the  age  of  71  years  3  months  and 

4  days. 

In  remembrance  of 

Eva  Strassburger 

born  Jager,  wife  of  Andreas  Strassburger.     She 

was  born  in  September  1752,  and  died 

the  16  July,  1835.     Her  age  was  82  years 

10  months  and  15  days 


1  Tombstone  Inscriptions.     Reformed  Church,  Zionsville,  Upper  Milford  Town- 
ship, Lehigh  County,  Pennsylvania. 


[Translation] 
Here  lies 
in  the  hope 
of  a  blessed  resurrection 
Johann   Andreas 
Strassburger 
He  was  horn  in  Europe 
the  24th  January  1754,  and 
came  to  America  in  the  year  1769. 
He  lived  in  wedlock  45  years 
with  Eva,  who  was  born  Jager 
begat  7  children  2  sons  and 
5   daughters   and  died   the  27th 
April    1825,    having    reached    the 
of  71  years,  3  months  and 
4  days. 


:8^  ^ttX^vc.yo  9:i«rtttttc 


'O' 


Tombstone  of 
Eva  Yeager  Strassburger. 


Tombstone  of 
Christine  Strassburger  Wieder. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  111 

Here  lies  the  body  of 

Anna  Christina  Wieder 

The  wife  of  Adam  Wieder 

maiden  name  Strassburger     She 

was  born  the  11  December 

1785  and  died  the  26  December  1823, 

after  she  had  come  to  the  age  of  37 

years  1  month  and  15  days 

She  lived  in  wedlock  15  years  2  months 

and  11  days  and  begat  6 

children 

Children  of  John  Andreiv  Strassburger  and  Eva  Yeager: 

Catherine  Strassburger,  born  July  23,  1784,  Upper  Milford 
Township,  Lehigh  County,  Pa. ;  died  January  28,  1864 ; 
married  first,  Christian  Young  who  died  in  Berks  County, 
Pa.,  before  December,  1835 ;  married  second,  Jacob  Hartzell. 
Children  :^ 

Joseph  Young,  born  December  31,  1812;  died  January 
2,  1889 ;  married  Hannah  Blumer.  Children :  E. 
B.  Young,  born  September  6,  1836;  died  December 
30,  1879 ;  married  Mary  .  Resided  in  Allen- 
town.  Issue:  Annie  E.  Young,  born  July  1,  1861; 
died  September  21,  1880.  Harry  J.  Young,  born 
September  6,  1862;  died  June  1,6,  1882.  E.  B. 
Young  was  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  War  and  a  Grand 
Army  Post  in  Allentown  was  named  for  him, 
William  S.  Young,  born  April  15,  1820;  died  December 

12,  1880;  married  Sarah .,  born  May  20,  1821 ; 

died  March  18,  1890.    They  had:  Charles  Young; 
Jennie  Young;  Dora  Young;  Hannah  E.  Young, 

who  married Weinsheimer ;  Mary  M.  Young, 

married    Monger;    John    Young,    married 

Amanda . 

Mark  S.  Young,  of  Allentown,  Pa. 
James  S.  Young,  of  Philadelphia,  Pa, 
Andrew  S.  Young,  born  March  31,  1811,  at  Hanover, 
Lehigh  County,   Pa.;    died    February    15,     1848, 


1  Miscellaneous  Book,  No.  1,  p.  76.    Allentown,  Pennsylvania. 


112  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Allentown,  Pa. ;  married  May  18,  1842,  Abbie 
Elizabeth  Moore,  daughter  of  Laommi  Moore,  of 
Morristown,  N.  J.  They  had  two  sons :  Frederick 
Rauch  Young  and  John  Edgar  Young.  Andrew 
S.  Young  was  a  minister  of  the  Reformed  Church. 

Samuel  S.  Young. 

Hannah  Young,  married  Dr.  Joel  Shelly,  of  Hereford, 
Berks  County,  Pa.  Their  son,  Percy  Y.  Shelly, 
was  a  minister  of  the  Reformed  Church. 

Mary  Young,  married  Seiger,  of  Allentown,  Pa. 

Rebecca  Young,  married  Hon.  Edwin  Albright,  Presi- 
dent, Judge  of  the  Lehigh  County  Court. 

Ebenezer  Young,  died  at  Belvidere,  N.  J. 

2.  Elizabeth   Strassburger,   married   November  29,    1803,   by   Rev. 

Samuel  Helffenstein,  D.D.,  of  the  First  Reformed  Church, 
Philadelphia,  to  Christian  Berger.  She  died  in  July,  1812, 
leaving  no  children.  In  the  fall  of  the  same  year  he  married 
her  sister,  Hannah  Strassburger. 

3.  Anna  Christina  Strassburger,  born  December   11,   1785,  Upper 

Milford  Township,  Lehigh  County,  Pa. ;  died  January  26, 
1823 ;  married  Adam  Wieder,  Jr.  They  were  members  of 
the  Great  Swamp  Reformed  Church  of  Lower  Milford 
Township,  Lehigh  County,  Pa.,  of  which  her  brother.  Rev. 
John  Andrew,  was  at  one  time  pastor. ^  She  was  buried  in 
the  graveyard  of  the  Reformed  Church  at  Zionsville, 
Upper  Milford  Township.     Children  : 

Hannah  Wieder,  married  Thomas  Egner. 

Caroline  Wieder,  married  John  Stabler. 

Eliza  Wieder,  married  Willoby  Gobel. 

Silas  Wieder. 

Mary  Wieder, 

4.  John  Strassburger,  born  February  14,   1787,  in  Upper  Milford 

Township,  Lehigh  County;  died  February  19,  1863,  Allen- 
town, Pa. ;  married  Maria  Gangewer,  born  September  22, 
1793;  died  March  20,  1878.  Resided  in  Allentown,  Pa. 
Issue  •?■ 


1  Records  Great   Swamp  Reformed  Church,  Lower  Milford  Township,   Lehigh 
County,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  Manuscripts,  Volume  XIV,  pp.  369  and  Zl\. 


1    .OW^ 


■jillK  Si  iiAb'Sl^U IsGER  FAM.U.Y  113 

Eron  Str&.«sbi'Vfcrei\  l>>ni  August  Z,  1814;  dfel   Sep- 

year5  1  month.  Buried  in 
irch  ydta,  near  Allentowri, 


:^  ^^^rsc 


July 

J  ■■  ■. 


i.^.,     .   tx.ni  April,    1827,  died  Jun« 
■!     ■.§  e-U  years,  3  months; ;  buried  10th  & 

^  .;      -^^  182'J;  dkd  October  6,  1832; 

Eiimiciine  Strasffviteger. 


I 


.S.     Mary  ;  -er;  mai  iStl"  1  ebruary  21,  1809,  Tohickoii  Re- 

■w        •        fit  " 

*'  ^u\>^  3. County,  Pa.,  John  Engleman/   of 

^:  ••■^3'i^^P.'    Lehig-li    County,    Pa.      John 

Jirigiana^i  wa^  one  (^  ^le  cxccutofs  of  his  father-in-law's 


6.     JOl  l^f  BURGER,  born  October  3,  1796, 


c. 


.J?;%/,  Ixhigb  County.^^i. ;  died  l^.Iay 
"erkasie,  Bug:';  County,  Pa.;  married  first,  CATIi- 
OIJT,  bom  November  5,  1792:  died  October  7> 
^nd,  Anna  Srover  fWorman). 

Hy    the    younj^v  of    John 

■  ••■^^r.    After  the  uc'-i:.  of  her  jvis- 

h-r    hrMf-1v->r-.fn-law,    Chribtian 


J-jha 

;:<,  which 
.•6.    As  a 


■oiylvania. 


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THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  113 

Eron  Strassburger,  born  August  5,  1814;  died  Sep- 
tember 6,  1819,  aged  5  years  1  month.  Buried  in 
F-rieden  Hill  Union  church  yard,  near  AUentown, 
Pa. 

Joseph  Strassburger. 

Maria  Strassburger. 

Sarah  Ann  Strassburger,  born  Ad^ay  22,  1821 ;  died  June 
10,  1871,  aged  50  years  and  18  days;  married  John 
McLean,  born  Hartford,  Conn.,  August  5,  1810; 
died  AUentown,  Pa.,  March  7,  1883. 

Samuel  Strassburger,  born  May  16,  1823 ;  died  July 
14,  1884,  AUentown,  Pa. 

Catherine  Strassburger,  born  April,  1827 ;  died  June 
22,  1841,  aged  14  years,  3  months;  buried  10th  & 
Linden  Streets,  AUentown,  Pa. 

Edwin  Strassburger,  born  1829;  died  October  6,  1832; 
buried  same. 

Emmeline  Strassburger. 

5.  Mary  Strassburger;  married  February  21,   1809,  Tohickon  Re- 

formed Church,  Bucks  County,  Pa.,  John  Engleman,^  of 
Upper  Mil  ford  Township,  Lehigh  County,  Pa.  John 
Engleman  was  one  of  the  executors  of  his  father-in-law's 
will. 

6.  JOHN  ANDREW  STRASSBURGER,  born  October  3,  1796, 

Upper  Milford  Township,  Lehigh  County,.  Pa. ;  died  May 
2,  1860,  Perkasie,  Bucks  County,  Pa. ;  married  first,  CATH- 
ERINE STOUT,  born  November  5,  1792;  died  October  7, 
1838.     Married  second,  Anna  Stover   (Worman). 

7.  Hannah    Strassburger,    probably    the    youngest    child    of    John 

Andrew  and  Eva  Strassburger.  After  the  death  of  her  sis- 
ter Elizabeth  she  married  her  brother-in-law,  Christian 
Berger,  by  whom  she  had  several  children. 

JOHN  ANDREW  STRASSBURGER,  second  son  of  John 
Andrew  and  Eva  Yeager  Strassburger,  was  the  third  of  the  name 
in  this  country.  He  was  born  in  Upper  Milford  Township,  which 
was  then  a  part  of  Northampton  County,  October  3,  1796.    As  a 


1  Records  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania. 


114  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

youth  he  received  the  ordinary  German  education  and  assisted 
his  father  in  his  trade  of  tanner  until  he  reached  his  nineteenth 
year.  At  an  early  age  he  felt  the  call  to  preach  the  Gospel,  and 
as  he  advanced  in  years  he  determined  to  prepare  himself  for 
the  ministry.  Upon  making  known  his  wishes  to  his  parents,  he 
found  that  his  father  not  only  opposed  his  taking  this  step,  but 
he  refused  to  furnish  the  necessary  means  to  prosecute  his  studies. 
Trusting,  however,  that  God,  who  had  called  him  to  labor  in  His 
vineyard,  would  not  forsake  him  and  having  the  prayers  and 
encouragement  of  his  mother,  he  left  home  in  the  year  1815,  firm 
in  belief  that  he  would  succeed.  The  German  Reformed  Church, 
having  at  this  time  neither  a  college  nor  a  seminary,  he  was 
compelled  to  study  privately,  and,  going  to  Philadelphia,  put 
himself  under  the  direction  of  the  Reverend  Samuel  Helffenstein, 
D.D.,  pastor  of  the  First  Reformed  Church,  the  oldest  church 
of  that  denomination  in  America.  The  money  which  was  re- 
quired to  pay  his  expenses  during  the  first  few  years  he  borrowed 
on  his  own  credit  from  friends,  except  the  small  amounts  a  sym- 
pathizing and  beloved  mother  sent  him  privately.  The  father, 
however,  appears  to  have  relented  after  a  time,  for  when  his 
estate  came  to  be  settled  in  1825  it  was  found  that  the  old  gentle- 
man had  advanced  to  each  of  his  children,  including  Andrew, 
the  sum  of  $800.00,  and  an  old  account  book  showed  that  he  held 
bonds  and  notes  against  his  son  Andrew  to  the  amount  of  $1124.00 
for  moneys  advanced  to  him. 

The  Reformed  Churches,  Tohickon,  Indian  Creek,  Ridge 
Road  and  Charlestown,  in  Bucks  County,  were  all  under  one 
charge,  which  became  vacant  in  1818,  and  John  Andrew  Strass- 
burger  was  elected  to  the  pastorate  of  the  four  churches.  He  was 
still  a  student  and  only  twenty-two  years  of  age.  He  applied  for 
a  license  to  the  Synod  of  the  German  Reformed  Church,  which 
met  that  year  in  Carlisle,  Pennsylvania,  and  a  certificate  of  licen- 
sure, dated  September  10,  1818,  was  granted  to  him.  It  is  sub- 
scribed to  by  Henry  Hoffmeier,  President,  and  Lewis  Mayer, 
Secretary.  The  original  is  in  German,  of  which  the  following  is 
a  translation: 

Certificate  of  Licensure 

"By  order  of  the  Synod  of  the  High  German  Reformed  Church  in 
North  America  Mr.  Andreas  Strasburger  as  candidate  is  given  for  one 


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THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  115 

year  full  power  to  perform  all  Ministerial  acts — This  is  certified  by  the 
signature  of  the  Praesidis  and  Scriba  together  with  the  accompanying 
printed  seal  of  the  Synod.  Given  in  Carlisle  in  the  State  of  Penn  —  the 
18'^  of  September  1818 

Heinreich  Hoffmeier     Praeses  p.  t. 

Lewis  Mayer  Scriba    p.  t." 

On  September  9,  1819,  fully  a  year  after  he  had  received 
this  appointment,  he  was  ordained  at  Lancaster,  Pennsylvania. 

Certificate  of  Ordination 
"This  Theological  candidate,  John  A.  Strasburger,  having  been  by 
his  examination  found  capable  and  living  as  becomes  a  servant  of  Christ, 
is  by  us  ordained  to  the  holy  ministry  and  received  as  a  member  of  our 
Reformed  Synod. 

"To  certify  this,  we  have  attached  our  Synodal  Seal.  Given  in  Lan- 
caster, in  Lancaster  County  in  the  State  of  Pennsylvania  the  9*^^  of 
September  1819. 

Lewis  Mayer,    Pres.    p.  t. 

Samuel  Helffenstein,   Scriba  p.  t." 

He  entered  upon  his  duties  as  pastor  of  the  four  churches 
on  Easter  of  1818,  and  here  he  lived  and  labored  from  the  be- 
ginning to  the  end  of  his  ministry,  a  period  of  thirty-six  years. 

On  September  15,  1818,  six  months  after  assuming  his 
ministerial  charge,  he  was  married  to  Catherine  Stout,  daughter 
of  Henry  Hartzell  and  Elizabeth  Kern  Stout,  of  Hilltown  Town- 
ship, Bucks  County.  The  following  notice  appeared  in  the  Doyles- 
town  Correspondent  and  Farmers'  Advocate  under  date  of  Sep- 
tember 22,  1818: 

"Married  on  the  15th  Inst,  by  the  Rev.  Mr.  Reller,  the  Rev.  Mr.  J.  A. 
Strassburger,  of  Rockhill  township,  to  Miss  Catherine  Stout  of  Hilltown 
township." 

The  story  is  told  that  on  his  journey  from  Philadelphia  to 
Bucks  County  to  assume  his  duties,  upon  arriving  in  the  district 
where  he  was  destined  to  remain  the  rest  of  his  days,  he  met  three 
beautiful  girls,  the  daughters  of  Henry  Hartzell  Stout,  a  prosper- 
ous landholder  of  the  neighborhood.  He  was  so  fascinated  by 
one  of  these  young  ladies  that  within  the  time  from  Easter  to 
September  he  had  courted  and  married  her. 


116  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger  and  his  wife  settled  in  Rock- 
hill  Township,  Bucks  County,  on  a  farm  now  part  of  the  town 
of  Sellersville,  but  after  a  few  years  he  acquired  a  more  extensive 
tract  of  land  in  what  is  now  South  Perkasie,  and  built  a  large 
two-story  stone  house  in  the  angle  formed  by  the  intersection  of 
the  Newtown  Road  with  that  leading  from  Philadelphia  to  Allen- 
tovm,  Pennsylvania.  The  house  stands  upon  an  eminence  in  the 
midst  of  fine  shade  and  fruit  trees,  the  whole  surrounded  by  a 
stone  wall.  By  the  addition  of  a  gable  roof  and  a  wide  porch, 
which  extends  across  the  entire  front  and  side,  and  by  the  intro- 
duction of  other  improvements,  the  aspect  of  the  original  building 
has  been  entirely  changed. 

The  first  record  of  any  purchase  of  land  by  Rev.  John 
Andrew  Strassburger  is  a  deed  dated  September  13,  1825,  wherein 
is  recited  that  Jacob  Kintner,  High  Sherift'  of  Bucks  County,  on 
June  25,  1825,  in  consideration  of  $2575.00,  sold  to  John  A. 
Strassburger  a  certain  tract  of  land,  containing  a  messuage  and 
eighty-two  acres  and  twenty-five  perches.  This  had  been  the 
property  Benjamin  Rosenberger  had  purchased  on  April  2,  1810, 
of  Henry  Price  and  wife,  Magdalena,  and  it  included  a  "Certain 
Water  Grist  Mill  and  tract  of  land  and  all  the  utensils  of  said 
Water  Grist  Mill,"  and  bounded  on  the  lands  of  Henry  Kramer, 
Adam  Nunamacker,  Leonard  Detweiler,  Jacob  Bergy  and  land 
late  of  John  Benner,  deceased. 

Benjamin  Rosenberger  on  April  29,  1820,  borrowed  of  the 
Farmers'  and  Mechanics'  Bank  of  Philadelphia  $2120.00,  giving 
as  security  his  farm  and  grist  mill  in  Bucks  County.  In  order  to 
liquidate  this  debt  to  the  bank,  on  February  20,  1821,  he  sold  the 
property  to  his  sons,  John  and  Jacob,  for  the  consideration  of 
the  debt  of  $2120.00  and  the  further  sum  of  $6146.67.  Benjamin 
Rosenberger  had  purchased  the  water  rights  for  the  mill  of  Henry 
Nunamacker  and  John  Benner  as  early  as  November  15,  1796, 
subject  to  the  payment  of  the  yearly  rent  of  one  shilling  and  six 
pence  to  each.  At  a  later  date  he  purchased  the  same  right  from 
Joseph  Leatherman.^ 

Upon  the  death  of  Benjamin  Rosenberger,  claims  for  debts 
were  brought  against  his  estate,  and,  in  order  to  satisfy  the  claim- 


1  Deed  Book  No.  49,  p.  928.    Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


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THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY 


117 


ants  and  to  pay  the  judgments  awarded  by  the  Court,  the  property 
was  ordered  to  be  sold  by  the  Sheriff.  Accordingly,  Jacob  Kintner, 
High  Sheriff  of  the  County,  held  a  public  sale,  and  John  Andrew 
Strassburger,  being  the  highest  bidder,  the  entire  eighty-two  acres 
and  twenty-five  perches  were  sold  to  him,  the  Sheriff  signing  the 
deed  on  September  13,  1825/  This  farm  lay  partly  in  Rockhill 
and  partly  in  Hilltown  Townships.  The  following  is  a  copy  of  an 
old  draft  of  this  land.  The  figure  "26"  marks  the  spot  where  the 
present  house  stands.  It  also  shows  the  course  of  Pleasant  Spring 
Run,  which  propelled  the  mill.^ 


Joseph  Leatherman  owned  an  adjoining  farm,  through  which 
Pleasant  Spring  Creek  ran.  On  May  10,  1833,  he  sold  to  his 
friend,  the  minister,  two  acres  of  his  land,  and  on  this  same 
day  Rev.  Strassburger  purchased  of  his  neighbor  the  right  to  use 
the  run  for  his  mill.    The  two  deeds  follow:^ 


1  Deed  Book,  No.  52,  p.  349.     Doylestown,   Pennsylvania. 

2  Original  Draft  in  the  possession  of  Mrs.  Andrew  S.  Hartzell. 

3  Deed  Book  No.  57,  p.  572,   573.     Doylestown,   Pennsylvania. 


118  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Deed:  Joseph  Leatherman  to  Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  1833 

Cfji0  Sn Denture  made  the  tenth  day  of  May  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty-three  Between  Joseph  Leath- 
erman of  Rockhill  Township,  in  the  County  of  Bucks  in  the  State  of 
Pennsylvania,  yeoman  and  Hester  his  wife  o.f  the  one  part,  and  the  Rev. 
John  Andrew  Strassburger  of  the  same  county  and  township  and  state 
aforesaid,  of  the  other  part.  Witnesseth  that  the  said  Joseph  Leatherman 
and  Hester  his  wife  for  and  in  consideration  of  one  dollar  lawful  Money 
of  the  United  States  *  *  have  granted,  bargained,  sold,  aliened, 
enfoeffed,  released  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Rev.  John  Andrew  Strass- 
burger all  that  certain  lot  or  piece  of  ground  situate  in  the  township  of 
Rockhill  in  the  County  aforesaid  adjoining  other  lands  of  the  said  Rev. 
John  Andrew  Strassburger,  land  of  Henry  Groff,  containing  two  acres 
and  twenty-three  perches.  *  *  In  witness  whereof  the  said  Joseph 
Leatherman  and  Hester  his  wife  to  these  presents  have  set  their  hands  and 
seals  hereunto  dated  the  day  and  year  first  above  written. 

Joseph    Leatherman 
Hester  Leatherman 

€^bi!S  3(n  Denture  Made  the  tenth  day  of  May  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  One  thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty-three,  between  Joseph 
Leatherman  of  Rockhill  Township,  in  the  County  of  Bucks  in  State  of 
Pennsylvania,  yeoman,  and  Hester  his  wife,  and  John  Andrew  Strass- 
burger of  the  same  township,  county  and  state  aforesaid,  D.D.  Whereas 
the  said  Joseph  Leatherman  and  John  Andrew  Strassburger  D.D.  at  the 
time  of  the  seal  and  delivery  of  these  presents  are  respectively  seized  in 
fee  of  and  in  two  contiguous  tracts  of  land  with  the  appurtenances  in  the 
township  of  Rockhill  aforesaid  and  whereas  there  is  a  race  or  water 
course  or  stream  of  water  passing  through  the  land  of  said  Joseph  Leath- 
erman for  the  purpose  of  propelling  the  mill  of  the  said  John  Andrew 
Strassburger.  Now  this  indenture  witnesseth  that  the  said  Joseph  Leath- 
erman and  Hester  his  wife  for  divers  good  causes  and  considerations  and 
the  further  sum  of  one  dollar  *  *  have  granted,  bargained,  sold  and 
confirmed  to  the  said  John  Andrew  Strassburger  all  the  water  of  said 
race  to  be  led  and  conveyed  along  said  race  through  the  lands  of  the  said 
Joseph  Leatherman  to  the  mill  of  the  said  John  Andrew  Strassburger 
agreeably  to  the  original  rights  of  Benjamin  Rosenberger  and  Elias 
Rosenberger  his  son. 

Joseph   Leatherman 
Hester   Leatherman 


6th  d:'- 

"i". 

j;>UCr;- 

of  la- 

t\:e  stras^rurger  family  hq 

r]'-o  fed  *'*r  t   '  Strassbiirger,  on  the 

lip  Shire,  of  Bedminster 
$2,030,00,  a  certain 
lla)«:o<:k  Township,' 


.untv 


liberty  of  mri 
■§\<i  to  others  to  be  used  a  (. 
?.  uOsQg  aiui  cleaning  ciovcj:  ovieu 

I  '^  .        On  May   12,    i82o,  John  G, 
--•   .'ii,  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of 
erred  _;ne.d  to  John  Andrev/  Stras&burger 

'tiie  txLii,...xVc  right  ?.  I  :;-  y  of  making,  constructing,  using  and 
lending  to  others  to  t..  ,..  _..  ''  -^  •  said  invention  and  improvement 
within  the  Township  of  '■[<:  LI,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania, 
for  the  term  ^  •  '";:  u^^ifs.    And  on  the  same  date  he  pur- 

chased  of  DaniCi  jv..  jon^jO^for  the  sum  of  $40.00,  all  his  rights 
in  the  use  of  thr;  Lniprolegieiit  in  Rockhill  Township/ 

On  Apr\  -  'I  ^-^''-  JtJ^iii  Andrew  Strassburger  pur- 

\!.;{;|^'   r  !^  ■niili  and  tract  of  i^d  in  HiIItox^T:). 
•  ,  uvi:i^>,>it  ri  the  homestead  farm. 

-,N  T?s;v    JOWK    A.>?DJ'.EVV.S'raASSUUP'7FY',    1830 


..■:berger 
.te  of  Hill- 


■.:-S,i:^^^'-<s^^gm^!srSi^,;^, 


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THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  119 

We  also  find  that  Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  on  the 
6th  day  of  April,  1826,  purchased  of  Philip  Shire,  of  Bedminster 
Township,  Bucks  County,  for  the  sum  of  $2030.00,  a  certain 
five  acres  of  land  which  was  situated  in  Haycock  Township,^ 
Bucks  County. 

In  the  year  1823  Thomas  D.  Birall,  of  Ontario  County, 
New  York,  had  received  Letters  Patent  from  the  United  States  for 
a  certain  improvement  which  he  had  invented  to  be  used  on  the 
agricultural  implement  for  hulling  and  cleaning  clover  seed,  and 
about  1825  sold  to  John  G.  Griffith  and  William  Griffith,  of 
Bucks  County,  and  to  Daniel  K.  Jones,  of  Wayne  County,  New 
York,  the  full  and  exclusive  right  and  liberty  of  making,  con- 
structing, using  and  lending  to  others  to  be  used  a  certain  im- 
provement in  the  machine  for  hulling  and  cleaning  clover  seed 
invented  by  the  said  Thomas."  On  May  12,  1826,  John  G. 
Griffith  and  William  Griffith,  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of 
$90.00,  transferred  and  assigned  to  John  Andrew  Strassburger 
"the  exclusive  right  and  liberty  of  making,  constructing,  using  and 
lending  to  others  to  be  used"  the  said  invention  and  improvement 
within  the  Township  of  Rockhill,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania, 
for  the  term  of  fourteen  years.  And  on  the  same  date  he  pur- 
chased of  Daniel  K.  Jones,  for  the  sum  of  $40.00,  all  his  rights 
in  the  use  of  this  improvement  in  Rockhill  Township.^ 

On  April  21,  1830,  Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger  pur- 
chased a  house  or  tenement,  oil  mill  and  tract  of  land  in  Hilltown 
Township,  which  became  part  of  the  homestead  farm. 

Deed:  Andrew  Heller  and  Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  1830 

Ci)i0  3nD0ntUt0  made  the  twenty  first  day  of  April  in  the  year 
of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty  Between  Andrew 
Heller  Esquire  of  Richland  township  County  of  Bucks  State  of  Penn- 
sylvania, Executor  of  Last  Will  and  Testament  of  Mary  Magdalena  Ben- 
ner  late  of  Haycock  township,  county  and  state  aforesaid  Widow,  de- 
ceased and  John  Andrew  Strawsberger  of  Rockhill  township  county  and 
state  aforesaid  minister  of  the  Gospel.  Whereas  Elias  Rosenberger 
Executor  last  Will  and  Testament  of  Benjamin  Rosenberger  late  of  Hill- 


1  Deed  Book  No.  51,  p.  579.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Deed  Book  No.  51,  p.  680.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


120  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

town  township  and  county  aforesaid  deceased  by  Indenture  dated  July 
sixteenth  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty  five  did  grant  and  con- 
firm unto  the  said  Mary  Magdalena  Benner  *  *  *  *  g.  certain  messuage 
tenement  oil  mill  and  tract  of  land  situated  in  Hilltown  township  afore- 
said Bounded  by  lands  late  Benjamin  Rosenberger,  Henry  Graff,  Elias 
Rosenberger  and  the  Old  Philadelphia  Road,  containing  thirty  three  acres 
of  land  (deed  Bk  51,  p.  219)  and  the  said  Mary  Magdalena  Benner  being 
so  seized  thereof  made  her  last  Will  and  Testament  dated  the  twenty-fifth 
day  of  July  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty  eight  wherein  and 
whereby  she  did  empower  and  authorize  her  executors  the  within  named 
Andrew  Heller  to  make  sale  of  all  her  lands  and  execute  deeds  for  the 
same  *  *  *  and  the  said  Andrew  Heller  after  due  public  and  timely 
notice  by  him  given  of  the  time  and  place  of  the  said  sale  on  the  thirty 
first  day  of  October  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty  nine  sold  the 
same  to  the  above  named  John  Andrew  Strawsberger  for  the  sum  of  One 
thousand  three  hundred  and  twenty  three  dollars  he  being  the  highest 
and  best  bidder  for  the  said  tract  of  land.  NOW  THIS  INDENTURE 
WITNESSETH  that  the  said  Andrew  Heller  for  and  in  consideration  o.f 
the  sum  of  One  thousand  three  hundred  and  tw^enty  three  dollars  *  *  *  * 
hath  granted  bargained  sold  released  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  John 
Andrew  Strawsberger  *  *  *  *  all  the  above  described  messuage  tene- 
ment oil  mill  and  tract  of  thirty  three  acres  of  land  as  above  set  forth. ^ 

Still  later  he  enlarged  his  farm  by  additional  purchases,  as 
shown  by  the  following  deed: 

Deed:  Isaac  Stout  to  Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  1844 

C!)10  SnDCntUtC  made  the  eighth  day  of  April  in  the  year  of 
year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  forty  four  Between 
Isaac  Stout  of  Rockhill  township  in  the  county  of  Bucks  in  the  state  of 
Pennsylvania  yeoman  and  Hannah  his  Wife  of  the  one  part  and  the  Rev. 
John  Andrew  Strasburger  of  Rockhill  township  county  and  state  afore- 
said of  the  other  part  WITNESSETH  that  the  said  Isaac  Stout  and 
Hannah  his  Wife  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  Sixteen  hundred 
and  thirty  six  [dollars]  Lawful  money  unto  them  in  hand  well  and  truly 
paid,  by  the  said  Rev.  John  A.  Strasburger  at  and  before  the  ensealing 
and  delivery  hereof  the  receipt  whereof  is  hereby  acknowledged  and 
thereof  doth  acquit  and  for  ever  discharge  the  said  John  A.  Strasburger 
his  heirs  and  assigns  by  these  presents  have,  granted,  bargained,   sold, 


^  Deed  Book  No.  56,  p.  452.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger 


■  -   ,  •  ..  .  -;:.u.-:.r(:  i:\:'-^    y.  .  ;  ■;,'  ..-  :    ,,-■■  ty.   ■  v    .'.'    .-y,.  i  oad  v^n- 

i  o-iiJ  A';:w":    V      •;■  ^;-.-  ;  ''.jv:,  ,    .  -r  ,>,r'i  ''; «,;-;,,  li^^e 

-■      '.    ^;--  .v''    hv   IM.'-      .-.     '■^-}\■>l]V:^    (\  ^  :>C'' ^..  <:.   ■'      H^-viiv   '' '-r  A       :'.h:-s 

■  '  ::'-^;  ';':0'f^  s -k  :  .  ;:.  '.':i  ^' ;' -iii''!  the  ;:•' i'l  .vijn  y  A;  r^^-'alv'iv-  P- ■ '■?  a:;  ? :  ."c  Si,-; 
•  ■ '•:'  -.1  i:)'.'^".'  ':-'.':.^::'':  hf  >"  I^irf  \Vi1i  ar  ^  7V^;:v?r:'rv\1:  fiai-t-d  the  '.^^c■*tv■  htth 
i_;y  'M  Jn'.:     -^    .i:u  u-an:l  Mtj*  f  !■!<  :drecl  nnd  tweniv  i^k^hr  'A'licreii'i  snd 

Auur'-:^'-  i '•■!!>  r  '<>  niAk..:  Sc^K:  v  I;  'xA  i-.-f  UnJs  .^nci  excoiae  ^3e*:d'v  for  t!in 
sani':?  "  '''  '"  and  the  saic!  "UKircw  11^ ''«>:■  -tier  due  public  and  dtinely 
noKce  by  liirn  i:\\:i:  >..>t  ths'  ■  ■;  ;c  and  pLscv  of  *•■>■  said  ?a!;^  on  ilxc  Ihirty 
hvst  day  of  C^•Jt^:^..•  -jko  u.^  -j-'A^/i  ^iyhl  i'.u-d/'f-i  ..ui.;  hvcaty  tiiTic  sold  the 
SLUiie  to  rhe  ai/  -  -^^  •:  M^it'u  ;.  ■       '^  .vire^v  ;■^'■■|"^^\v^■  ■■,;:;>•  i-^r  the  sum  of  One 

an-,.  U-..  .■---■•.  ..     •'     ■:  .  ;r.,'i      :\-.   •■  M 'S  INDFIMT' JRr: 

X'v  i  i  :v  ;'';•; '!  :  ■•,        ■  ■'■•■■..   '',:;;■.•;   ;.,'  •■   ■  ■■    r-'U'^^viiiZtion  oi' 

tiie  •■Tu;:  r-'                  ..•;■■  -    i;''' -l:.^  .■■•:  -    ■     ;--\^rs    ^-   *   =*■   '"^ 

had)   'v  -*■■•'  -  .;   ,  ;•■■■:  -.•'  ^    ;^t;i  i   jo^i'i 


■■■■■■■'{■-   >r:-.  \'-^f::''-:;n?.?r.   !.^m- 
-  '-  '    •  '':.■:■'    ii    ■  y:?t  ;;:  <iv,.    ,. is,   oi 

'   ■     '■'",  ■'■■-''    '.^  .,  •  ■  ■ '^v    c>ui    V  ;'■■;■    t'.^i.'"    l.K'i.Vvc:On 

->•>;•    ■  ■    '        ■'''        v.<;.!  'r-  \.:-i  "■:■    .   ■uiiv  :f  j^/^cU-;  rn  fhe  state   ,>f 

;;.-•' .v:t;:.r.    ■•.•  •;■  -      =':  ■     i. ■;:'...■  ;'•■■••  '■'  •>'  .^!:  ti;c  ^''^^^  part  and  dn:  V'cv. 

^  /-u^drev:    :•.;;;:•-.■■;   ^   <,i   R-...;d;ji!  v  .v;r  ^hij,  c:in;:y  m^a  •-.-^tc  &.fnrc- 

■;v  1;.^  ulh-^r  y;  • '  ■,■■.'.;■■>.■  i' S.^ 5  "I'H  tj,;ui  tiie  ;^;dd  I::.aao  Siont;  a-Kl 
.;.;  s  5>,..  vA'di;.:  f-. .   ,;::;  f:>  •-.:■■;  ;'K-r';d.  ;■!  ■:. '  ihc  Si-iir;  ■'  t  >-:;vii;oA  hui'drrd 

^'-   '-a'd  K.;-;     I-'^:;:   A.   :;lT'.;.:^bt:rc"cr  at  .i'-^l   \. "if  ■:,:'>.:■  Iru    '-v  ;^;  •!n:7 

'  .■■■:.^)r  -a:-^    /  ^    -v*  -  :l>sch;.r-c  rh'^  ^H^"'    '     ■■:■     ■     -;■'-  ':.^[-\\v::/-. 

■:     ■■  •    .■•    •>•,    r-:-.r:    :;^-<:--e:U.-   ;a;v.     ^y  .'^^   d       ■        :■:••'    sv  Id. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  121 

released,  and  confirmed  and  by  these  presents  do,  grant,  bargain,  sell, 
release  and  confirm  unto  the  said  John  A.  Strasburger  his  heirs  and 
assigns,  two  certain  lots  or  pieces  of  Land,  situate  in  the  township  afore- 
said No.  1  limitted  and  bounded  as  follows,  viz,  Beginning  at  a  stone  a 
corner,  thence  extending  along  other  land  of  said,  J.  A.  Strasburger  north 
fifty  degrees  and  three  quarters  west  twenty  one  perches  to  a  stone  a  cor- 
ner thence  along  land  now  of  Isaac  Stout  north  fifty  five  degrees  east, 
forty  four  perches  to  a  corner,  thence  extending  along  other  land  of  said 
Adam  Pluck  south  forty  nine  degrees  ten  minutes  east  twenty  three 
perches  to  a  corner,  thence  along  other  land  of  J.  A.  Strasburger  south 
forty  nine  degrees  west,  forty  three  perches  and  eight  tenths  to  the  place 
of  beginning,  containing  six  acres  and  two  perches  of  Land  more  or 
less  *  *  *  Lot  No.  2  Beginning  at  a  stone  a  corner  in  a  public  road 
and  thence  extending  along  lands  of  Leonard  Detweiler  south  forty  eight 
degrees  twenty  five  minutes  east,  fifty  five  perches  and  six  tenths  to  a 
corner  thence  extending  along  lands  of  John  Cramer,  south  thirty  eight 
degrees  and  three  quarters  west,  fifty  one  perches  and  one  tenth  to  a  stone 
a  corner,  thence  along  land  of  J.  A.  Strasburger  north  forty  eight  degrees 
forty  minutes  west  ninety  seven  perches  and  eight  tenths  to  a  stone  a  cor- 
ner, thence  extending  along  a  public  road  and  lands  of  said  J.  A.  Stras- 
burger north  sixty  five  degrees  east  fifty  five  perches  and  three  tenths  to 
the  place  of  Beginning  containing  twenty  one  acres  and  ninety  nine 
perches  of  Land  more  or  less  in  Hilltown  Township,  it  being  part  of  the 
premises  of  which  Adam  Nunnemaker  died  intestate  upon  which  due 
application  to  the  orphans  court  of  Bucks  county,  an  order  was  granted 
for  the  sale  of  the  real  estate  of  said,  decease,  the  same  was  sold  to  Isaac 
Stout  and  was  confirmed  by  the  court  to  be  and  remain 'firm  and  stable 
for  ever — relation  being  had  to  the  proceedings  in  the  said  orphans  court 
A  D  1843,  will  in  full  and  at  large  appear.  *  *  *  *  IN  WITNESS 
WHEREOF  the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have  hereunto  set  their 
hand  and  seals  the  day  and  year  above  written-" 

Isaac  Stout 
Hannah  Stout 

The  copy  of  the  old  draft  as  shown  on  following  page, 
describes  the  extent  and  boundaries  of  all  of  this  land. 

During  this  time  Rev.  Strassburger  was  serving  the  four 
Reformed  churches  under  his  care.  Though  several  times  pressed 
to  take  charge  of  larger  and  wealthier  congregations,  he  always 


1  Deed  Book  No.  71,  p.  2>22,  etc.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


122 


THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


refused  to  leave  his  own  people,  to  whom  he  became  more  and 
more  attached.  In  the  course  of  time  he  came  to  look  upon  every 
member  of  his  congregation  as  his  disciple,  whom  he  had  either 
baptized  in  infancy,  confirmed  in  youth,  married  in  manhood, 
visited  in  sickness,  or  comforted  at  the  grave  of  a  relative. 


^^.r^ 


-A, 


A  great  sorrow  had  come  to  him  in  the  death  of  his  dearly 
beloved  wife,  Catherine.  During  the  summer  of  1838  she  had 
been  taken  seriously  ill  and  had  first  become  blind,  then  deaf,  then 
lost  the  sense  of  touch  and  taste.  After  lingering  several  months 
in  this  sad  condition,  death  finally  claimed  her,  and  she  passed 
away  on  Sunday,  October  7,  1838,  not  yet  having  reached  her 
fortieth   year,    and   was   buried   in   the   graveyard   of   Tohickon 


/.,.  ^'-^v 


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Copy  of  Family  Record  in  lianchvriting  of  Rev.  juhn  Andrew  Stras,>l)nrger, 

Tlie  last  record  was  added  by  Rev.  X.  A.  Strassburger 

after  the  death  uf  his  father. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  123 

Church,     The  following  obituary  appeared  in  a  local  German 
paper  :^ 

"Died,  on  Sunday  Oct.  7'^,  1838,  Catharine,  wife  of  the  Rev.  J.  A. 
Strassburger  of  Rockhill  Township,  Bucks  Co.  in  the  40'^  year  of  her 
age.  She  left  a  sorrowful  husband  and  several  children  to  mourn  her 
early  departure  and  was  laid  to  rest  in  Tohickon  Church  yard.  In  the 
past  summer  the  deceased  had  the  misfortune  to  lose  the  use  of  her  eyes 
her  hearing  sense  of  touch  and  taste.  She  had  had  for  several  months  a 
sorrowful  existence  till  at  last  she  is  released  from  her  misery." 

Eight  children  were  left  to  mourn  a  beloved  mother,  the 
eldest,  Nero,  a  youth  of  nineteen,  while  the  youngest,  the  father's 
namesake,  was  only  five.  There  had  been  thirteen  children  in  all, 
five  of  whom  had  died  in  infancy.  On  the  baptismal  register 
of  Tohickon  Reformed  Church  we  find  the  following  entries  of 
baptisms:" 

1819,  Nero,  son  of  J.  A.  Strassburger  and  Catharine,  born  August 
7th,  1819. 

1820,  Louisianna,  daughter  of  J.  A.  Strassburger  and  Catherine, 
born  November  24th,  1820. 

1822,  Gideon,  son  of  J.  A.  Strassburger  and  Catherine,  born  February 
26,  1822. 

1823,  Rubin,  son  of  J.  A.  Strassburger  and  Catherine,  born  October 
1,1823. 

1826,  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  J.  A.  Strassburger  and  Catherine,  born 
February  25,  1826.     Witnesses,  Henry  Stout  and  Elizabeth. 

1827,  Henry  Stout,  son  of  J.  A.  Strassburger  and  Catherine,  born 
November  2nd,  1827.     Witnesses  Henry  Stout  and  Elizabeth. 

1832,  Catharine,  daughter  of  J.  A.  Strassburger  and  Catherine,  born 
November  16th,  1832. 

1836,  Noah,  son  of  J.  A.  Strassburger  and  Catherine,  born  February 
23rd,  1836. 

The  family  record  in  the  handwriting  of  Rev.  John  Andrew 
Strassburger,  a  photograph  of  which  appears  elsewhere,  names 
two  other  children  who  died  in  infancy,  also  a  daughter,  Mary, 


^  Sumneytown  Batiern  Frcund,  October  17,  1838.     Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania. 
2  Records  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania. 


124  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

who  was  born  December  20,  1830,  whose  godmother  was  Mary 
Kern,  and  a  son  Andrew,  born  December  31,  1833,  whose  twin 
sister,  Sarah,  lived  to  be  only  six  months  old. 

On  May  8,  1839,  Rev.  Strassburger  married  Anna  Stover,  or 
Stouffer,  daughter  of  Jacob  Stouffer  and  widow  of  David  Worman, 
of  Coventry  Township,  Chester  County,  Pa.  A  pre-nuptial  agree- 
ment was  entered  into  between  the  contracting  parties,  the  under- 
standing being  that  should  the  Rev.  Strassburger  die  first,  the 
intended  wife,  as  the  widow,  should  receive  only  one-ninth  of 
his  estate,  and  that  he,  on  his  part,  released  all  claim  to  any 
property  which  might  come  to  her  through  her  father. 

Marriage  Agreement  Between  Rev.  John  A.  Strassburger 
AND  Ann  Worman,  1839 

Cf)I0  Sn Denture  Made  the  fifteenth  day  of  April  An°  D*"  One 
thousand  eight  hundred  and  thirty  nine  Between  John  A.  Strassburger  of 
Rockhill  Township  in  the  County  of  Bucks  and  State  of  Pennsylvania  of 
the  one  part  And  Ann  Worman  of  Coventry  Township  in  the  County 
of  Chester  in  the  state  aforesaid  Widow  of  the  other  part  Whereas  as 
marriage  is  intended  by  divine  permission  to  be  shortly  had  and  solem- 
nized Between  the  aforesaid  parties  NOW  THIS  INDENTURE  WIT- 
NESSETH that  in  consideration  of  the  said  marriage  to  be  had  and  for 
settling  a  competent  provision  for  the  said  Ann  Worman  out  of  the  said 
John  A.  Strassburger  in  case  she  shall  survive  him  in  Bar  of  her  Dower 
and  thirds  at  Common  law,  and  for  other  goods  and  valuable  purposes 
and  consideration,  the  said  John  A.  Strassburger  has  granted  covenanted 
and  given  by  these  presents  for  himself  his  heirs  Executors,  Administra- 
tors and  Assigns  doth  grant  covenant  and  give  unto  the  aforesaid  Ann 
Worman  the  one  ninth  part  of  all  his  estate  real  and  personal  to  be  paid  to 
her  within  one  year  after  the  decease  of  the  aforesaid  John  A.  Strass- 
burger to  the  only  proper  use  benefit  and  behoof  of  the  said  Ann  Wor- 
man her  heirs  and  assigns  for  and  during  all  the  term  of  her  natural  life 
for  and  in  the  name  of  a  jointure  and  in  full  recompense  lien  and  satis- 
faction of  all  the  dower  which  she  may  or  otherwise  might  have  claim 
or  challenge  in  all  or  in  part  of  the  estate  real  and  personal  or  mixed  of 
the  said  John  A.  Strassburger  her  intended  husband  after  his  decease. 
And  the  said  John  A.  Strassburger  for  himself  his  heirs  executors  admin- 
istrators and  assigns  relinquish  all  right  title  claim  and  demand  to  all 
or  any  part  of  the  estate  that  may  hereafter  be  given  willed  or  granted 


THE  STRA^- 

to  her  the  a  Wor: 

:'rouifer.     'in  Wiincss   • 

hands  and  ':' '■  ■"  ''"'  day  •.  .-■ 


•R  FAMILY 


125 


•A'if<.:  by  htr    iather  Jacob 
-  hereunto  set  their 


'^■i'iUv-;- 


.uniii 


Lnv;ir  hand-;  &  seals  A.  D.  1839 


?- 


►9  3^ 


John  A.  STKASSBuaGEK 
Ann  Wokman 


5.  -^ 


untv  I\lav-:?/:|  iS60.    Recorded  June  18,  1.860. 
■  ^  g. 
5 
■   Sncier  date  of  May  8,  1839,  the 

-*    ;..-..    oT!.  the  16th  nit,  Rev.  J.  A. 
^  i.  Ann  Worrnan,  of  Lawrenceville, 


|r  ^h'  quoted,  Rev.  St^«sshurger 

>  nor  uf  the  'ary 

•       '  of 

Oa 

lid  the 

vnship, 


«'atiu. 


■.■*>S5S!»'i,'l^     »■•« 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  125 

to  her  the  said  Ann  Worman  his  intended  wife  by  her  father  Jacob 
Stouffer.  In  Witness  Whereof  the  said  parties  have  hereunto  set  their 
hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year  first  above  written.^ 

J.  A.  Strassburger 
Witnesses  present  Ann  Worman 

at  signing 

Fred'k  K.  Setzler 

David  Y.  Custer 

Supplementary  to  the  foregoing  Marriage  Settlement  and  further 
the  said  John  A.  Strassburger  doth  for  himself  his  heirs,  executors  admin- 
istrators and  assigns  Relinquish  immediately  after  his  death  all  claim 
interest  title  or  demand  whatsoever  to  the  Dower  of  the  said  Ann  Wor- 
man to  which  she  is  entitled  out  of  the  estate  of  her  husband  David  Wor- 
man deceased  late  of  Coventry  Township  Chester  County.  In  Witness 
Whereof  both  parties  have  hereunto  set  their  hands  &  seals  A.  D.  1839 
April   15th. 

John  A.  Strassburger 
Ann  Worman 
Witnesses  present  at  signing 

Fred'k  K.  Setzler 

David  Y.  Custer 
Affirmed  in  Chester  County  May  23,  1860.     Recorded  June  18,  1860. 

In  the  Pottstown  Journal,  under  date  of  May  8,  1839,  the 
following  notice  of  the  marriage  appeared : 

"By  Rev.  H.  S.  Miller,  at  the  Trap,  on  the  16th  ult..  Rev.  J.  A. 
Strassburger,  of  Bucks  County,  to  Mrs.  Ann  Worman,  of  Lawrenceville, 
Chester  County." 

As  shown  by  a  deed  previously  quoted,  Rev.  Strassburger 
had  purchased  of  Andrew  Heller,  executor  of  the  estate  of  Mary 
Magdalena  Benner,  a  certain  house  and  oil  mill  and  tract  of 
land  which  had  also  been  part  of  the  Rosenberger  estate."  On 
April  3,  1850,  Mr.  Strassburger  and  his  wife,  Anna,  sold  the 
greater  part  of  this  property  to  Elias  Herr,  of  Hilltown  Township, 
who  was  a  miller,  for  $3000.00. 


1  Miscellaneous   Book  No.   13,  p.  524.     Doylestown,   Pennsylvania. 

2  Deed  Book  No.  56,  p.  452.    Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


126  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Deed:  Reverend  John  Andrew  Strassburger  to  Eli  as  Heller,  1850 

C^[)i0  SnDCntUtC  Made  the  third  day  of  April  one  thousand  eight 
hundred  and  fifty  Between  Reverend  John  Andrew  Strassburger  of  Rock- 
hill  Township,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania,  D.D.  and  Anna  his  wife  of 
the  one  part  and  EHas  Herr  of  Hilltown  Township  County  and  State 
aforesaid,  Miller,  WITNESSETH  that  the  said  John  Andrew  Strass- 
burger and  Anna  his  wife  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  three 
thousand  dollars  *  *  *  *  have  granted  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Elias 
Herr  his  heirs  and  assigns  all  that  certain  messuage  mill  property  and  two 
separate  lots  or  pieces  of  ground  lying  and  being  in  the  Township  of 
Rockhill  and  Hilltown  aforesaid  one  being  bounded  by  lands  of  said  John 
Andrew  Strassburger  and  Abraham  Groff's  land,  Isaac  Fellman  the  public 
road  and  John  Kramer's  land  Containing  twenty  nine  acres  and  twenty 
eight  perches — No.  two  adjoining  lands  John  Shellenberger  Containing 
two  acres  and  fifteen  perches.  These  two  lots  containing  together  thirty 
one  acres  and  ninety  five  perches  *****  jt  being  the  larger  part  of  the 
same  messuage  and  lot  or  piece  of  ground  which  Andrew  Heller  Esquire, 
Executor  of  the  last  Will  and  Testament  of  Mary  Magdalena  Benner, 
late  of  Haycock  Township,  County  of  Bucks,  deceased,  by  deed  April  1, 
1830  granted  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  John  Andrew  Strassburger 
(Deed  Book  56,  p.  452)  and  also  of  a  piece  and  parcel  of  land  which 
Joseph  Leatherman  and  Hester  his  wife  by  Indenture  dated  May  10,  1832 
granted  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  John  Andrew  Strassburger  (Deed 
Book  57,  p.  572),  And  also  all  the  water  rights  courses,  members  and 
appurtenances  whatsoever  unto  the  above  mentioned  premises  belonging 
*  *  *  *  IN  Witness  Whereof  the  said  parties  unto  these  presents  have 
hereunto  set  their  hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year  first  above  written.^ 

J.  A.   Strassburger 

Anna  Strassburger 

About  this  time  his  health  began  to  fail  to  such  an  extent 
that  he  was  constrained  reluctantly  to  resign  his  pastorate,  and 
on  July  15,  1854,  he  presented  his  resignation,  after  having  served 
the  same  congregation  for  thirty-six  years  during  which  period 
he  had  baptized  about  3000  children,  confirmed  1595  catechumens, 
married  1235  couples  and  buried  1044  persons. 

The  notice  of  his  resignation,  having  been  brought  before 
his  sorrowing  people,  the  Consistories  of  the  four  united  con- 


1  Deed  Book  79,  p.  26.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


RESIC^NATIO]^. 


After  due  notice,  the  Consistories  of  the  four  imiuJ  Con;ir('ir;itions,  to  wit :  IndiaD-; 
'Field  Clmrlostown,  Toliickoi),  and  Rid^reRoad— nssoiiiblod  in  Kid^fo  Road  Cliurcti,  on; 
Jkatur'd ay  afternoon,  at  1  o'cl'-ck,  on  whicli  occii-inn  the  Pastor  of  snid  cliargo  handed  ^ 
I  in  his  resignation,  viz:  (i 

On  account  of  bodily  and  mental  debility,  I,  J.   A.  Strafsevkceb,  resign  my  minis- 
terial char.-'c  amongst  you,  after  a  servitude  of  tbiriy-?i.v  ytiirf<  and  three  montlis  ;  dur- 
ing which  Ume  about  tliroo  thousand  eliitdron   were   received   by  infant   holy   l!a[ifisin  ; 
filtecn  hundred  and  ninetv-fivc  members  bv  Confirmation,  after  Cateclietical  instnictioiis  ; 
;  twelve  hundred  and  thirty-tive  couple  were  instituted  in  the  holy  bonds  of  wi:dlock,  b\ 
|l  matrimonial  eercmo.ny  ;  one  thousand  and  Ibrty-four  committed  to  their  lone;  and  solitary  , 
ijhome.  on  which  occasions  fimerjil  addresses  were  delivered.  j 

That  the 'i-reat  Shepherd  of  his  flock  may  soon  bless  you  agaip  with  a  pious  and 
I  faithful  Pastorr  is  the  solemn  wish  and  hum'ble  prayer  of  yours  alTcctionately  in  the 
j  j^ord.  J-  ^^-  STRASSBUKGER. 

•     Ridge  Road  Church,  Rockhill  tsp.,  Bucks  Co.,  July  II,  IS54. 

After  they  had  noiuinated  a  Committee  of  the  T-lders  of  the  four  congregations,  and 
thev  were  inlormed  of  the  declination  of  the  Re\.  X.  S.  Strassbcboek  to  serve  a^  a  can-;] 
jj'didate,  the  Kqv.  AtcesT  Dechaxt  was  nominated  to  1m-  the  ne.\t  Pastor';    and   Mr.  Paul'; 
if.  Hntt/.ell  and  Mr.  Henry  Schlichter  «ere  nppoiiit.;d  a  committee  to  iuforai  him  of  his  ; 
nonunatif^n,  aod  to  make  such  arran^'emeut>  as  will  be  ueccrsary  to  hold  an  election. 


9Ja*  (\fi)5:i3fc  iRgdirid;!  rnfaitimellfn  fid)  M;  ,§ir(i),-nta(lk-  N't  uict  ivreini.itcn  ®.-mnntfn,  a!63niiaii< 
fitlt'.  ElptltftciDn,  SqI)  cfcn  uiib  S.-rfl  itt.iOf,  am  gamftjj  Jl.irfniiilwj  um  tin  Uljr  ui  iix  Sag-ettasfn. 
Slrdif,  bit  'rrol*ft  ®(t>'.3fniv,t  ^fr  f.ifjct  bffa.iln  @;mciiit;n  fcin;  5h\fijn.Uion  <imoid;tc  reie  fdgt : 
"  3ci  gclg;  torpjifidjec  iinC  g.-irtiid):r  ej)n;cid)lut>ffit  cntfaji:  iA,  3.  S.  S  t  r  a  6  b  u  r  a  <  c,  mcintr  gcift- ' 
lid),-n  fijinffcabn  untfr  fud),  n!id)  ma  riaiil(o!t  roil  Uin^  un^  Ixtmi  JjlKon  itnD  trfi  2)ii?ncitcn  ;  matitenS  , 
n«ld)(C  3,-ft  ungffabt  ttci  ua'mi  St-intit  turd)  fcif  h.nli;V  'S.v.iU  aufajnoiiirn.-ii  trurrcn  ;  ,-m  t.in|Vn&,  fuiif 
bunti-it  unt)  fiiiif  l'n6n,■t:n^i.1^Uld).Sat;il^TUa.^I6tl:l■tid;t.  (Sia  t.iiiK'nS,  vwi  bun^crt  tint'  funf  unCCvcipij  ' 
$aav,'  nnirNn  tutd)  ta?  -J.mi  {..-r  bfil'sjtn  GiK  tniunScn  ;  tu\  raufi-nS  ua5  Ditic  unb  Btniig  ainficn  Den  SJfj} 
jum  miasn  2ft(n,  bd  wAiyn  S.I.-a^nb.itcn  '^ciiciucfcn  afh-iltf"  reiittcn. 

I:ii§  bfv  gtosc  £)irtf  ni.i)  b.ilc  m\;iit  mit  t'mtm  frcmmon  mil)  tvcucii  jailor  fi'flncn  xaiy,  ijt  bci  ffittli 
*e  iSur.fd)  unt  Ui  temutbiiK  ®>tft  (ii'.(6  in  tern  Syxxt^  «rjibri»n 

-SBerij  Stv.ip.-  .Sitdic.  ERo.tfciU  Sautifd;ip,  Sndo  Gaiinti),  3i.;i  15,  b:>l. 

!RMi)^.-m  pen  b.-n  'SfltifJin  N-t  Bin  Qiomclnti'ii  eini-  (SL^aitinlt.-;:  .'r.i.rinf,  'Ju^  bi,'fabf  oon  ttx  <5ntfasuiifl 
i,-sei)V(ti.  91.  S.  girjRturgd:  al6  (SanMfat  unt.-ttid)t<'t  roar,  t^■'^uCo^rlf  ei)nT>.  '.H  u  juft  £cd)a  n  t  crnsnpt, . 
tie  SltUe  fiinflij  ju  fuUcii,  im»  tio  .&;rton  -^vA  S).  fiaitn-U  iiit>  ,f?cnvii  S.blidjfcv  fl!5  Gcmmittrf  bfilimmt,  • 
ibn'roif  btc  etn.-nnun.i  in  ,^i'nnl:ii|;  yj.  f.'hfii  un^  fif  iiotbig-ii  5'oc?ebiuii,)<:i  fur  citi,-  2B.ibl  ^u  (roff.-iT.  ; 


Resignation  of  Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  127 

gregations,  whom  he  had  so  long  and  faithfully  served,  assembled 
in  Ridge  Road  Church  on  a  Saturday  afternoon  of  July  to  re- 
ceive the  following  communication: 

"On  account  of  bodily  and  mental  debility,  I,  J.  A.  Strassburger, 
resign  my  ministerial  charge  amongst  you,  after  a  servitude  of  thirty-six 
years  and  three  months ;  during  which  time  about  three  thousand  children 
were  received  by  infant  holy  Baptism;  fifteen  hundred  and  ninety-five 
members  by  Confirmation,  after  Catechetical  instructions;  twelve  hun- 
dred and  thirty-five  couples  were  instituted  in  the  holy  bonds  of  wedlock, 
by  matrimonial  ceremony;  one  thousand  and  forty-four  committed  to 
their  long  and  solitary  home,  on  which  occasions  funeral  addresses  were 
delivered. 

"That  the  great  Shepherd  of  his  flock  may  soon  bless  you  again  with 
a  pious  and  faithful  Pastor,  is  the  solemn  wish  and  humble  prayer  of 
yours  affectionately  in  the  Lord. 

J.  A.  Strassburger, 

"Ridge  Road  Church,  Rockhill  tsp.,  Bucks  Co.,  July  14,  1854." 

The  eldest  son,  Nero,  had  entered  the  ministry  and  at  this 
time  was  pastor  of  Friedensburg  and  other  congregations  of  the 
Reformed  faith  in  Berks  County.  A  committee  of  elders  from  the 
four  congregations — Indian  Creek,  Charlestown,  Tohickon  and 
Ridge  Road — approached  the  son  and  requested  that  he  succeed 
his  father  as  pastor  of  this  charge,  but  for  some  reason  he  refused, 
and  Rev.  August  Dechant  was  nominated.  Copies  of  the  resigna- 
tion and  the  proceedings  of  this  meeting  were  printed  in  both  the 
English  and  the  German  language  and  pamphlets  distributed 
among  the  members  of  the  several  churches.^ 

His  failing  health  also  prevented  Rev.  Strassburger  from 
looking  after  his  large  business  interests  which  he  had  carried 
on  outside  of  his  ministerial  duties,  so  on  April  19,  1858,  he  sold 
to  Samuel  M.  Hager,  of  Rockhill  Township,  for  the  sum  of 
$3250.00,  the  property  known  as  "Strassburger's  Mill"  with  the 


1  An  original  copy  of  this  pamphlet  is  in  the  possession  of  the  family.  It  is 
noted  that  one  of  the  four  churches  named  is  that  of  Indian  Field.  This  was  the 
name  given  the  Lutheran  Congregation,  while  that  of  the  Reformed  was  called 
Indian  Creek. 


128  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

water  right/  and  a  tract  of  eight  acres,  lying  between  the  two 
farms,  upon  which  he  accepted  a  mortgage. 

Death  was  gradually  approaching;  he  steadily  grew  worse, 
and,  while  confined  to  bed,  he  suffered  no  pain.  Finally,  on  Tues- 
day, May  2,  1860,  he  fell  quietly  and  peacefully  asleep,  apparently 
without  a  struggle,  and  was  buried  on  Monday,  May  7,  in  the 
graveyard  at  Indian  Creek  Church,  in  the  presence  of  an  un- 
usually large  number  of  mourning  friends  and  relatives. 

Pastor  Strassburger  had  reached  the  age  of  63  years  6  months 
and  30  days.  Of  his  eight  children  who  grew  to  maturity,  the 
marriages  of  four  are  to  be  found  recorded  in  the  old  church 
book  of  Tohickon: 

1839,  November  10,  Elias  Hartzel  and  Louisiana  Strassburger 

1846,  March  12,  Aaron  F.  Shelly  and  Elizabeth  Strassburger 

1847,  January  21,  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  and  Elizabeth  Schwenk 
1849,  September  29,  Jesse  D.  Hartzell  and  Mary  Strassburger 

John  Andrew  Strassburger  was  of  a  mild,  kind  and  modest 
disposition  and  beloved  and  respected  by  all  who  knew  him.  He 
had  a  fairly  large  library  of  both  English  and  German  books, 
many  of  which  are  treasured  keepsakes  of  his  grandchildren  and 
great-grandchildren  today.  That  he  had  a  love  and  appreciation 
of  music  is  evidenced  by  the  fact  that  a  musical  notebook  which 
is  still  in  existence,  was  made  for  him  in  1824  by  Charles  Fort- 
man,  an  early  teacher  of  languages  and  music  in  Norristown. 
In  this  book,  prepared  for  Pastor  Strassburger,  are  ninety-one 
sacred  and  forty-one  profane  songs,  nearly  all  in  German.  Among 
the  profane  pieces  are  "Hail  Columbia,"  "Hunting  Song,"  "Harms 
des  Alten  Hannassen  Sohn,"  "Washington's  March"  and  "Yankee 
Doodle."  This  book,  the  title  of  which  is  "Anfangs-Griinde  Des 
general  Basses  (Thorough  bass)  fiir  Den  Ehrw.  Herrn  Strasburger 
Rockhill  Tsp.  Pa.  by  Ch^  Fortman,  December  1824"  (Rudiments 
of  Thorough  Bass,  prepared  by  Charles  Fortman  for  the  Rev.  Mr, 
Strassburger,  Rockhill  Township,  Pa.,  December,  1824),  is  a 
manuscript  11  inches  by  5^4  inches,  bound  in  leather,  and  con- 
tains 142  pages. 


1  Deed  Book  No.  103,  p.  272.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


^  ■      "» 


4^  oC^.A^^.^J^^_  rJ^.,.^y/^^^:,^J^y^^^j^^^ 


Page    from   sermon   book   of   Rev.   John   Andrew    Strassburger, 

written    in    own    handwriting    in    EngHsh    for    delivery 

Tohickon  Church — These  sermons  were  prepared 

in  both  Enghsh  and  German. 


■t     ^If     .   ■M 


"  T*^,,,  '    .-.^■^•^ 


'» 


if^M 


'f  6>. 


A" 


e  /y  tr^ 


c , 


;"  \,f     %  ^^.^  -.^v^-' A'-^"  y^/^/f 


-f'lj 


:i 


Page  from  same  sermon  book,  written    in    his    own    handwriting, 
in  the  German  language. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  129 

Another  temporal  characteristic  of  Pastor  Strassburger  was  his 
fondness  for  his  "schnapps."  On  his  ride  from  Tohickon  to  In- 
dian Creek,  which  he  took  every  Sunday,  he  would  stop  at  Jacoby's 
Hotel,  which  he  passed  on  the  way,  take  his  schnapps  and  then  go 
on  to  preach  his  afternoon  sermon  in  the  latter  church. 

In  the  Necrological  Record  in  Rev.  William  Dubbs'  Manual 
of  Reformed  Church  History  we  find  the  following  brief  and  in- 
accurate biography: 

"John  Andrew  Strassburger,  born  in  Upper  Milford,  Lehigh  County, 
Pennsylvania,  October  3,  1796;  died  Sellersville,  Pennsylvania,  May  2, 
1860.  Preceptor,  Dr.  S.  Helffenstein.  Licensed  by  the  Synod  of  the 
United  States,  1818 ;  ordained  1819.  Pastor  of  Tohickon,  Indianfield  and 
Charlestown  Churches,  1818  to  1854." 

He  left  no  will.  Letters  of  administration  upon  his  estate 
were  issued  shortly  after  his  death  to  his  son,  Reuben  Strass- 
burger, and  his  son-in-law,  Elias  Hartzell.  On  May  24  an  in- 
ventory of  his  estate  was  taken  by  J.  W  Leidy  and  Amos  Jacoby, 
and  the  whole  appraised  at  $9071.89.  However,  as  during  his 
lifetime  he  had  advanced  certain  moneys  to  his  wife  and  children, 
these  amounts  added  to  the  appraised  value  brought  the  estate  up 
to  a  total  valuation  of  $20,052.11.  In  the  final  settlement,  each 
heir  was  charged  with  the  sum  credited  to  him  or  her,  as  found 
upon  the  father's  books,  and  that  sum  was  deducted  from  one 
equal  ninth  part,  or  share,  as  the  whole  estate  was  divided  thus 
equally  between  his  wife  and  each  of  the  children,  the  second 
wife,  Anna,  receiving  just  so  much  as  was  agreed  upon  at  the  time 
of  their  marriage. 

Among  his  personal  effects  was  a  musical  clock,  a  piano,  a 
galvanic  battery,  and  two  lancets  (the  last  named  articles  sug- 
gesting that  at  times  he  ministered  to  the  bodily  as  well  as  the 
spiritual  being  of  his  flock),  a  family  horse  and  carriage,  and 
sleigh.  He  held  stock  in  the  Bank  of  Pottstown,  the  Doylestown 
Bank,  the  Doylestown  Insurance  Company,  Northampton  Water 
Company  of  Allentown,  Pa.,  Hilltown  and  Sellersville  Turnpike 
Company,  and  the  Quakertown  Turnpike  Company,  and  the  North 
Penn  Rail  Road. 


130  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Inventory* 
A  true  and  perfect  inventory,  and  just  appraisement  of  all  and  singu- 

ler  the  goods  and  chattels,  rights  and  credits,  which  were  of  John  A. 
Strassburger  late  of  the  township  of  Rockhill  County  of  Bucks  and  Com- 
monwealth of  Pennsylvania  deceased,  at  the  time  of  his  death  to  wit 

$  cts 

Cash     19.94 

Wearing  apparel  of  the  deceased 40.00 

Musical  Clock  $25  ;  Common  Clock  $6 31.00 

Sofa  $20     Piano  $15,  Rocking  chair  $5 40.00 

Corner  Cubboard  &  Contents  $12,  Desk  $4.50 16.50 

Two  Tables  $4.50     Three  Window  Blinds  $5 9.50 

1  Doz.  Chairs  $5.     >4  Doz     do    2.50 7.50 

One  Bed  $10.     do  $4,  do  $9,  two  do  $12,  1  do  $3 38.00 

Two  Oil  Cloths  $1.     Fluid  Lamp  $1.     Looking  Glass  $1 3.00 

Lot  of  Books  $1.     Fly  Driver  $1.     Picture  .50<^'^ 2.50 

Lot  of  Carpet  $13,     do  $4,     do  $25 42.00 

Four  Maps  $8.     Looking  Glass  $1.     do  &  Pictures  $1.25 10.25 

Galvanic  Battery  $5,  Waites  &  Window  Shades  $1.50 6.50 

Cradle  $2.     Stand  .50^'^    Window  Curtains  &c.  $4 6.50 

Stand  &  Chamber  Set  $2.50     Looking  Glass  $3.25 5.75 

Case  of  Drawers  $3.     Dressing  Cubboard  $4 7.00 

Stand  $1.     Pitcher  &  Basin  .50=*^     Pillow  Cases  $1 2.50 

Lot  of  Sheets  $10,     Four  window  Shades  $1.50 11.50 

Lot  of  Blankets  &  Coverlids  $16,  Sundries  $5 21.00 

Copper  Kettle  $11,  Soap  &  Bag  $2.00 13.00 

Books  in  the  Library  $25,  Two  Lancets  $2 27.00 

Table  Cloths  $4.     Basket  &  Brush  &c.  $1.50 5.50 

Three  Stoves  $17.     Basket  &  Cubboard  $1.50 18.50 

Sundries  $2.     Buffaloe  Robe  $6,  Fly  net    3 11.00 

Sleigh  Bells,  whip  &  Bridle  $3,  Lot  of  Bags    5 8.00 

Amount  Carried  Over 403.94 

$  cts. 

Amount  Brought  Over 403.94 

Lot  of  Wheat  $25.     Rye  $55,     Indian  Corn  $19 99.00 

Grain  Box  $5,     Lot  of  Demijohns  75'=*^     Tubs  &c  $2 7.75 

Lot  of  Sundries  $1.50     Lot  of  Boards  $1.75 3.25 

Chests  &  Benches  $3.     Steelyard  &c.  $1.50 4.50 

Three  Copper  Kettles  $8,     Frying  pans  .50"='^ 8.50 


Original  paper  in  possession  of  the  family. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  131 

Pot  Racks  &c  $2.     Lot  of  Sundries  $1.50 3.50 

Wheel  Barrow  $3.     Grind  Stone  75"^^     Sundries  $1 4.75 

Lot  of  Carpet  $6.     Sundries  75'^*^     Five  Chairs  $2 8.75 

Two  Tables  $3,     Kitchen  Dresser  &  Contents  $9 12.00 

Shovel  &  Tongues  $1.25     Lantern  &c  50<^'^ 1-75 

Sink  Kettles  &  pans  $2.50.     Stone  Sledge  &c  $2.00 4.50 

Blanket  &  Table  Cloth  $1.50     Post  Digger  $1.50 3.00 

Family  Horse  $100.     Carriage  $40.     Sleigh  $5.00 145.00 

Single  Harness  $10,  Olde  Roof  $10.     Log  Chain  .50^*^ 20.50 

Crops  Growing  at  the  time  of  decedants  death 

Viz      Rye  &  Wheat,  $100,     Oats  $50 150.00 

Indian  Corn  $75,  Grass  for  Hay  $25 100-00 

LotofPoultry 10-00 

20  Shares  N.  P.  R.  R.  Stock    $9 180.00 

2         do      Bank  of  Pottstown  $52 104.00 

5          "       Northampton  Water  Company  $5 25.00 

4         "       Hilltown  &  Sellersville  Turnpike  Co.    $4 16.00 

4         "       Quakertown  &  do                 do                $8 32.00 

88          "       Doylestown  Bank  of  Bucks  Co.            $47 4136.00 

500         "       N.  P.  R.  R.  Six  per  cent  Bond            $70 250.00 

18  Coupons  N.  P.  R.  R.  Company         15 270.00 

Mortgage  Bond  due  of  S.  M.  Hager 1750.00 

Amount  Due  of  Doylestown  Insurance  Co 750.00 

Dividend  due                do                do             45.00 

do           "             Doylestown  Bank   123.00 

300  Shares  Doylestown  Insurance  Co.  Stock  $1 300.00 

Amount  Carried   forward 9071.89 

$  cts 

Amount  brought  forward 9071.89 

Advancements  Made  by  the  decedent  to  his  heirs,  in  his  life 
time  as  follows  to  wit 

To  his  Son  Nero    1311.92 

"     "     Daughter   Louisiana    1000.18 

"     ''     Son  Gideon    1000.00 

"     "        "     Reuben    1000.00 

"     "     Daughter  Elizabeth  1000.02 

"     -          -          Mary    1000.30 

"     "     Son  Henry   2625.00 

"     "        "     Andrew     1000. 

"    Ann  Strassburger 1000. 


132  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Book  Accounts 

Geo.  Detweiler  4.50 

David  Bean    8.00 

Adam  Wetzell    6.80 

One  Shed  at  the  Indian  Creek  Church 23.00 


20052.11 
Taken  and  appraised  by  us  the  24*^  day  of  May  A.  D.  1860  one  thou- 
sand eight  hundred  and  Sixty 

J.  W.  Leidy 
Amos  Jacoby 

On  September  10,  1860,  a  petition  signed  by  Anna  Strass- 
burger,  the  widow,  and  all  the  sons  and  daughters,  was  presented 
to  the  Orphans'  Court  at  Doylestown,  asking  that  the  Court  ap- 
point Josiah  W.  Leidy,  Amos  Jacoby  and  Isaac  Hunsberger, 
previously  chosen  by  the  heirs,  to  act  as  Commissioners  to  divide 
and  value  the  real  estate  in  place  of  a  Sheriff's  Inquisition,  as  was 
the  usual  proceeding.  The  Court  was  pleased  to  grant  this  request, 
and  so  on  September  17,  1860,  the  three  Commissioners  made  a 
return  of  their  valuation  and  partition,  which  was  refused  by  the 
heirs,  who  then  asked  that  the  estate  be  sold. 

Bucks  County  S.  S. 

At  an  Orphans  Court  held  at  Doylestown  in  and  for  the  County  of 
Bucks  the  Tenth  Day  of  September  A.  D.  1860  Before  the  Honorable 
Daniel  M.  Smyser  President  and  his  associate  Judges  of  the  Same 
Court — 

The  Petition  of  Ann  Strassburger  Widow  of  John  A.  Strassburger 
late  of  Rockhill  Township  Bucks  County  dec<^  and  of  Nero  S.  Strass- 
burger Gideon  S.  Strassburger  by  his  attorney  in  fact  Henry  Troxel, 
Reuben  Y.  Strassburger,  Henry  S.  Strassburger,  Andrew  S.  Strass- 
burger, sons  of  the  said  Decedent  above  the  age  of  twenty  One  years,  and 
Louisiana  Strassburger  Intermarried  with  Elias  Hartzel,  Elizabeth 
Strassburger  intermarried  with  Aaron  F.  Shelly,  Mary  Strassburger 
Intermarried  with  Jesse  D.  Hartzel,  Daughters  of  the  said  Decedent 
above  the  Age  of  twenty  One  years  respectfully  Represents  That  The 
Said  John  A.  Strassburger  died  Intestate  on  the  Second  day  of  May 
A.  D.  1860  Leaving  a  Widow  the  above  named  petitioner  and  issue  Eight 
Children  viz  Nero  S.  Gideon  S.  Reuben  Y.  Henry  S.  Andrew  S. 
Louisiana  intermarried  with  Elias  Hartzel,  Elizabeth  intermarried  with 
Aaron  F.  Shelly  and  Mary  Strassburger  Intermarried  with  Jesse  D.  Hart- 


132  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Book  Accounts 

Geo.  Detweiler  4.50 

David  Bean    8.00 

Adam  Wetzell    6.80 

One  Shed  at  the  Indian  Creek  Church 23.00 


20052.11 
Taken  and  appraised  by  us  the  24'^  day  of  May  A.  D.  1860  one  thou- 
sand eight  hundred  and  Sixty 

J.  W.  Leidy 
Amos  Jacoby 

On  September  10,  1860,  a  petition  signed  by  Anna  Strass- 
burger,  the  widow,  and  all  the  sons  and  daughters,  was  presented 
to  the  Orphans'  Court  at  Doylestown,  asking  that  the  Court  ap- 
point Josiah  W.  Leidy,  Amos  Jacoby  and  Isaac  Hunsberger, 
previously  chosen  by  the  heirs,  to  act  as  Commissioners  to  divide 
and  value  the  real  estate  in  place  of  a  Sheriff's  Inquisition,  as  was 
the  usual  proceeding.  The  Court  was  pleased  to  grant  this  request, 
and  so  on  September  17,  1860,  the  three  Commissioners  made  a 
return  of  their  valuation  and  partition,  which  was  refused  by  the 
heirs,  who  then  asked  that  the  estate  be  sold. 

Bucks  County  S.  S. 

At  an  Orphans  Court  held  at  Doylestown  in  and  for  the  County  of 
Bucks  the  Tenth  Day  of  September  A.  D.  1860  Before  the  Honorable 
Daniel  M.  Smyser  President  and  his  associate  Judges  of  the  Same 
Court — 

The  Petition  of  Ann  Strassburger  Widow  of  John  A.  Strassburger 
late  of  Rockhill  Township  Bucks  County  dec*^  and  of  Nero  S.  Strass- 
burger Gideon  S.  Strassburger  by  his  attorney  in  fact  Henry  Troxel, 
Reuben  Y.  Strassburger,  Henry  S.  Strassburger,  Andrew  S.  Strass- 
burger, sons  of  the  said  Decedent  above  the  age  of  twenty  One  years,  and 
Louisiana  Strassburger  Intermarried  with  Elias  Hartzel,  Elizabeth 
Strassburger  intermarried  with  Aaron  F.  Shelly,  Mary  Strassburger 
Intermarried  with  Jesse  D.  Hartzel,  Daughters  of  the  said  Decedent 
above  the  Age  of  twenty  One  years  respectfully  Represents  That  The 
Said  John  A.  Strassburger  died  Intestate  on  the  Second  day  of  May 
A.  D.  1860  Leaving  a  Widow  the  above  named  petitioner  and  issue  Eight 
Children  viz  Nero  S.  Gideon  S.  Reuben  Y.  Henry  S.  Andrew  S. 
Louisiana  intermarried  with  Elias  Hartzel,  Elizabeth  intermarried  with 
Aaron  F.  Shelly  and  Mary  Strassburger  Intermarried  with  Jesse  D.  Hart- 


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THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  133 

zel,  and  seized  in  his  demesne  as  of  fee  of  and  in  the  Following  Described 
Real  Estate  Situate  in  the  Township  of  Rockhill  and  Hilltown  in  the 
County  of  Bucks  Containing  One  hundred  and  Six  Acres  more  or  Less, 
and  Bounded  by  lands  of  John  H.  Moyer,  Isaac  S.  Hendricks,  Abraham 
Grofif,  John  &  Noah  Groff,  The  old  Bethlehem  road,  and  also  by  lands 
of  Abraham  Nunemaker  John  Detweiler,  Adam  Fluck,  Abraham  Hend- 
ricks David  Moyer  and  others.  The  said  tract  of  Land  having  been  oc- 
cupied for  several  years  past  as  one  farm  or  plantation  allthough  pur- 
chased at  two  different  periods — No  Petition  or  Valuation  of  the  said  Real 
Estate  having  been  Made  Your  Petitioners  pray  the  Court  to  order  and 
appoint  Josiah  W.  Leidy,  Amos  Jacoby,  and  Isaac  Hunsberger  three  Com- 
missioners who  have  been  Nominated  and  agreed  upon  by  the  parties,  to 
divide  or  value  the  said  Real  Estate,  with  the  same  legal  Effect,  as  if  done 
by  a  Sheriff's  Inquisition  for  the  same  purpose,  according  to  the  Acts  of 
Assembly  in  such  case  Made;  and  to  make  report  of  their  proceedings 
at  the  next  Orphans  Court : 

Whereupon  September  17,  A.  D.  1860  The  Said  three  Men  Made 
report  that:  That  in  pursuance  of  the  said  order,  we  went  upon  the 
premises  therein  discribed  due  and  timely  Notice  to  the  parties  Men- 
tioned in  said  order  having  been  given  and  as  Many  of  them  as  chose 
being  present ;  and  finding  that  equal  partition  in  value  could  not  be  made 
of  the  said  real  Estate  to  and  among  all  the  parties  in  the  said  order  Men- 
tioned without  prejudice  to  or  spoiling  the  whole  thereof  we  have  divided 
the  same  into  three  several  parts  or  divisions  by  Metes  and  bounds,  and 
have  Valued  and  appraised  the  Said  respective  parts  or  divisions  as  fol- 
lows to  wit 

Purpart  No.  1.  On  which  the  Mansion  house  Stands  and  other 
buildings,  Beginning  at  a  Iron  pin  set  for  a  comer  in  the  public  road  run- 
ning through  the  said  premises  thence  along  land  of  Isaac  S.  Hendricks 
S  38y2°  W  28.59  perches  to  a  wild  cherry  tree  a  corner  thence  along 
land  of  Abraham  Groff  S.  40^°  E.  16.27  perches  to  a  Stake  a  corner 
thence  along  land  of  the  Same  and  John  &  Noah  Groff  S.  35^°  E  24.72 
perches  to  a  Stone  a  corner  thence  along  land  of  John  &  Noah  Groff  the 
three  following  courses  viz.  N.  42°  E  19.84  perches  to  a  stone  for  a  cor- 
ner S.  34°  E  26  perches  to  a  Stake  a  corner  and  S.  21>^°  E  8.56  perches 
to  a  Stake  a  corner  thence  along  lot  No.  2,  the  two  following  courses  viz 
N  72y4°  E  68.36  perches  to  a  Stake  a  corner  and  S.  45>^°  E  48.96  perches 
to  a  Stake  a  corner  in  a  line  of  Abraham  Nunemaker  Land  thence  along 
the  same  N  41>^°  E  37.38  perches  to  a  Stone  a  corner  thence  along  Land 
of  John  Detweiler  N  45>4°  W  56.15  perches  to  a  Stone  a  corner,  thence 
along  the  same  and  land  o.f  Adam  Pluck's  N  46^2  W  77.60  perches  to  a 
Stake  a  corner  thence  along  Land  of  Said  Adam  Fluck  N  46°  W  23.10 


134  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

perches  to  a  post  a  corner  thence  along  lands  of  Abraham  A.  Hendricks 
and  Abraham  H.  Mover  S  55^°  W  44.08  perches  to  a  Stone  Set  for  a 
corner  thence  along  Lot  No.  3,  the  two  following  courses  Viz:  S  47^^° 
E  5.22  perches  to  a  Stake  a  corner  and  S  44  W  29.44  perches  to  a  Stake 
in  the  aforesaid  Public  road  a  corner  thence  along  land  of  Isaac  S.  Hend- 
ricks S  483^°  E  4.60  perches  to  the  place  of  Beginning  Containing  Th 
Acres  and  79  perches  of  Land  be  the  Same  More  or  less.  Situate  in  the 
townships  of  Rockhill  and  Hilltown ;  We  have  valued  and  Appraised  at 
the  Sum  of  Five  Thousand  Eight  Hundred  and  Seventy  Nine  Dollars  and 
Fifty  cents  $5879.50 

Purpart  No.  2.  On  which  there  are  no  Buildings  Beginning  at  a 
Stake  a  corner  in  the  Philadelphia  road  thence  along  tract  No.  1,  the  two 
following  courses  and  distances  Viz,  N  72J4  E  68.36  perches  to  a  Stake 
a  corner  and  S.  45^^°  E  48.96  perches  to  a  Stake  a  corner  in  a  line  of 
Abr™  Nunemaker's  Land  thence  along  the  Same  S  41^  W  98.34  perches 
to  a  Stake  a  corner  in  the  aforesaid  public  road  thence  along  said  road 
N  21j4  W  93.93  perches  to  the  place  of  Beginning  Containing  35  Acres 
and  3  perches  of  Land  be  the  same  more  or  less.  Situate  in  Hilltown 
Township ;  We  have  valued  and  appraised  at  the  Sum  o.f  One  Thousand 
Seven  Hundred  and  Fifty  Dollars  $1750.00 

Purpart  No.  3.  On  which  a  Brick  Dwelling  House  Stands  and  other 
Buildings,  Beginning  at  a  Stone  in  the  aforesaid  public  road  a  corner, 
thence  along  Land  of  Isaac  S.  Hendricks  S  48^^°  E  16.28  perches  to  a 
Stake  a  corner  thence  along  tract  No.  1  N  44°  E  29.44  perches  to  a  Stake 
a  corner  thence  along  the  same  and  Land  of  Abraham  H.  Moyer  N.  47^ 
W  18  52  perches  to  a  post  a  corner  thence  along  land  of  Said  A  H.  Moyer 
and  John  H.  Moyer  S  41°  W  29.74  perches  to  the  place  of  Beginning 
Containing  3  Acres  and  34  perches  of  Land  be  the  same  more  or  less. 
Situate  in  Rockhill  Township ;  We  have  Valued  and  Appraised  at  the 
Sum  of  One  Thousand  Five  Hundred  Dollars  $1500.00  according  to  law. 
Which  said  Report  was  duly  Confirmed  by  the  Court :  Whereupon 
September  17*'^  1860  all  the  heirs  appeared  in  open  Court  and  refused  to 
accept  of  any  of  the  said  Real  Estate  at  the  Valuation  Returned  thereof 
and  desired  the  Same  Might  be  sold.  Whereupon  the  Same  time  the 
Court  awarded  an  order  of  Sale  to  R.  Y.  Strassburger  and  Elias  Hartzel, 
Administrators  of  the  said  dec'd  to  Sell  Said  Real  Estate.  *  *  * 

Whereupon  December  3'''^  A.  D.  1860  The  Said  Administrators  Made 
Report  That  pursuant  to  the  within  order  of  Court  they  did  at  the  time 
and  place  therein  mentioned  Expose  the  within  described  premises  to  sale 
by  public  \^endue  or  outcry :  But  the  Same  remains  unsold  for  want  o.f 
Buyers  and  they  therefore  pray  that  an  alias  Order  of  Sale  of  the  said 
property  May  be  granted  to  them  returnable  at  the  next  adjourned  Court; 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  135 

And  now  to  Wit  Same  day  The  Court  Granted  an  Alias  Order  *  *  * 

1860  September  17*^  The  Order  issued  in  the  Case  to  be  for  the  Sale 
of  the  Premises  in  3.  annual  payments  free  and  discharged  of  the  Widows 
dower  it  being  shown  to  the  Court  here  that  by  an  ante-nuptial  Marriage 
Settlement  Between  the  decedent  and  his  wife  the  present  Widow  all 
ricrht  and  claim  to  the  Same  was  renounced  released  and  discharged  for 
the  Consideration  therein  Expressed  and   Set  forth  *  *   *  Whereupon. 
January  23*^  A.  D.  1861  The  Said  Administrators  Made  report:  That  m 
pursuance  of  the  said  Alias  Order  of  Court :  they  did  at  the  time  and  place 
therein  mentioned  having  given  due  public  and  timely  Notice  of  the  time 
and  place  of  the  Sale  Expose  the  premises  therein  described  to  Sale  by  Pub- 
lic Vandue  or  outcry  and  Sold  Lot  No.  1,  Containing  Seventy  three  Acres 
and  Seventy  Nine  perches  to  Aaron  Hendricks  .for  the  Sum  of  Four 
Thousand  Four  Hundred  and  Nine  Dollars  and  Sixty  two  cents,  he  bemg 
the  highest  and  best  bidder  and  that  the  highest  and  best  price  bidden  for 
the  Same     Lot  No.  2,  Containing  thirty  five  Acres  and  three  perches  to 
Aaron  Hendricks  for  the  Sum  of  One  Thousand  Four  Hundred  Dollars 
and  Seventy  five  cents  he  being  the  highest  and  best  bidder  and  that  the 
highest  and  best  price  bidden  for  the  Same.     And  Lot  No.  3,  Contammg 
three  Acres  and  thirty  four  perches  to  Aaron  Hendricks  for  the  Sum  of 
One  Thousand  two  hundred  and  Sixty  Dollars,  he  being  the  highest  and 
best  bidder  and  that  the  highest  and  best  price  bidden  for  the  Same,  and 
they  respectfully  pray  that  the  Sales  So  Made  of  the  three  Several  lots 
respectively  May  be  Confirmed  by  the  Court— Whereupon  January  23 
1861  The  Court  Confirmed  nisi  the  Report  of  Sale  so  as  aforesaid  Made. 
Abstract  of  the  Real  Estate  of  John  Andrew  Strassburger  Deceased 

Bucks  County  S.  S. 

Certified  from  the  Record  a  true 
Copy  or  Abstract  &c. 
Witness  My  hand  and  Seal  of  Court 
at  Doylestown  this  sixth  day 
o.f  March  A.  D.  1861. 

A.   B.   ROSENBERGER 

On  April  1,  1861,  the  Administrators  executed  a  deed  trans- 
ferring all  the  property  to  Aaron  Hendricks,  the  purchaser.  This 
deed,  the  original  of  which  was  in  the  possession  of  the  late 
Andrew  S.  Strassburger,  who  until  a  few  months  ago  owned  the 
farm  and  resided  in  the  old  homestead. 


136  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Deed  :  Reuben  Strassburger  et  al  to  Aaron  Hendricks,  1861 

Cf)i0  3ntl0tttUrC  made  the  First  day  of  April,  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  sixty  one,  Between  Reuben  Strass- 
burger and  EHas  Hartzell  Administrators  of  all  and  singular  the  goods 
and  chattels,  rights  and  credits  which  were  of  John  A.  Strassburger  late 
of  Rockhill  Township,  Bucks  County  and  State  of  Pennsylvania,  deceased, 
of  the  one  part,  and  Aaron  Hendricks  of  Hilltown  Township,  County  and 
state  aforesaid,  (Auctioneer)  of  the  other  part,  Whereas  Jacob  Kintner, 
High  Sheriff  of  the  said  County  of  Bucks,  by  his  Deed  Poll  duly  executed, 
under  his  hand  and  seal,  bearing  date  the  Thirteenth  day  of  September, 
A.  D.  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty  five,  for  the  consideration 
therein  mentioned  and  by  virtue  of  a  certain  writ  of  Venditioni  Exponas 
therein  recited,  did  grant  and  confirm  unto  the  said  John  A.  Strassburger 
and  to  his  heirs  and  assigns,  A  Certain  Messuage  and  tract  of  about 
eighty  two  acres  and  twenty  perches  of  land  situate  in  Rockhill  and  Hill- 
town  Townships,  County  of  Bucks  aforesaid.  And  Whereas  Isaac  Stout 
and  Hannah,  his  wife,  by  their  deed  of  Indenture,  duly  executed,  bearing 
date  the  Eighth  day  of  April,  A.  D.  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and 
fourty  four,  and  recorded  in  the  Office  for  Recording  of  Deeds,  at  Doyles- 
town,  in  said  County  of  Bucks,  in  Deed  Book  No.  71  Page  322  &c;  for  the 
consideration  therein  mentioned,  did  grant  and  confirm  unto  the  said  John 
A.  Strassberger,  two  certain  lots  of  pieces  of  land.  No.  1,  situate  in 
Rockhill  Township  aforesaid.  Containing  Six  Acres  and  two  perches  of 
land.  No.  2,  situate  in  Hilltown  Township  aforesaid.  Containing  twenty 
one  acres  and  ninety  nine  perches  of  land  (more  or  less)  To  Have  and  To 
Hold  the  same  unto  him,  his  heirs  and  assigns  forever,  by  force  and  virtue 
of  which  said  two  above  recited  deeds  of  Indenture,  the  said  John  A. 
Strassburger  became  in  his  lifetime  lawfully  seized  in  his  demense  as  of 
fee,  of,  in  and  to  the  above  mentioned  messuages  and  three  tracts  of  land, 
with  the  appurtenances,  and  being  so  thereof  seized  as  aforesaid,  died 
intestate.  And  Whereas  at  an  Orphans  Court  held  at  Doylestown  in  and 
for  the  County  of  Bucks  aforesaid,  the  Tenth  day  of  September  A.  D. 
1860,  upon  the  petition  of  Ann  Strassburger,  widow,  of  John  A.  Strass- 
burger, deceased,  and  of  Nero  S.  Strassburger,  Gideon  A.  Strassburger, 
by  his  Attorney  in  fact,  Henry  Troxel,  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger,  Henry 
S.  Strassburger  and  Andrew  S.  Strassburger,  sons  of  said  decedent,  and 
Louisianna  Strassburger,  intermarried  with  Elias  Hartzell,  Elizabeth 
Strassburger,  intermarried  with  Aaron  F.  Shelly  and  Mary  Strassburger, 
intermarried  with  Jesse  D.  Hartzell,  daughters  of  said  decedent,  praying 
the  said  Court  to  order  and  appoint  Josiah  W.  Leidy,  Amos  Jacoby  and 
Isaac  Hunsberger  three  Commissioners,  who  have  been  nominated  and 


Manuscript  Music  Book  belonging  to  the 
Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  137 

agree  upon  by  the  parties,  to  divide  or  value  the  said  real  estate  v^ith  the 
same  legal  effect  as  if  done  by  a  Sheriff  Inquisition  for  the  same  pur- 
pose, according  to  the  Act  of  Assembly  in  such  case  made  and  provided, 
the  said  Inquest  was  awarded  by  the  Court  according  to  the  prayer  of  the 
said  petitioners,  Whereupon  September  17th,  A.  D.  1860,  the  said  three 
Commissioners  made  return  thereof  to  the  Judges  of  the  said  Orphans 
Court,  that  equal  partition  in  value  could  not  be  made  of  the  said  real 
estate  to  and  among  all  the  parties,  without  prejudice  to  or  spoiling  the 
whole  thereof,  and  therefor  the  said  Commissioners  aforesaid,  valued  and 
appraised  the  same,  which  return  and  valuation  were  confirmed  by  the 
said  Court,  at  the  same  time  all  the  heirs  and  legal  representatives  of  said 
deceased,  appeared  in  open  Court  and  refursed  to  accept  of  said  real, 
estate  at  the  valuation  thereof,  and  desired  that  the  same  might  be  sold, 
Whereupon  the  same  time  the  said  Court  awarded  an  order  of  sale  to 
Rebun  Y.  Strassburger  and  Elias  Hartzell  Administrators  of  the  said 
deceased,  to  sell  the  said  real  estate.  Whereupon  December  3rd  A.  D. 
1860,  the  said  Administrators  made  report  that  they  were  unable  to  sell 
the  same  for  want  of  buyers,  and  prayed  the  said  Court  to  grant  an  alias 
order  of  sale,  the  same  time  the  Court  granted  an  alias  order,  in  pursu- 
ance whereof  the  said  Commissioners  did  in  accordance  with  the  direc- 
tions of  the  said  order,  expose  the  premises  therein  mentioned  to  sale  by 
public  vendue,  and  sold  the  same  to  the  said  Aaron  Hendricks  at  and  for 
the  sum  of  Seven  thousand  and  seventy  Dollars  and  thirty  seven  cents,  he 
being  the  highest  and  beat  bidder  and  that  the  highest  and  best  price  bid- 
den for  the  same,  which  sale  on  return  thereof  made  to  the  Judges  of  the 
same  Court,  was  on  the  23rd  day  o.f  January  A.  D.  1861,  confirmed,  and 
it  was  considered  and  adjudged  by  the  said  Court,  that  the  same  should 
be  and  remain  firm  and  stable  forever,  as  by  the  records  and  proceedings 
of  the  said  Court,  reference  being  thereunto  had  will  more  fully  and  at 
large  appear.  Now  This  Indenture  Witnesseth,  That  the  said  Reuben 
Y,  Strassburger  and  Elias  Hartzell  Administrators  as  aforesaid,  for  and 
in  consideration  of  the  said  sum  of  Seven  thousand  and  seventy  Dollars 
and  thirty  seven  cents,  to  them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  Aaron  Hendricks 
at  and  before  the  ensealing  and  delivery  hereof,  the  receipt  whereof  they 
do  hereby  acknowledge,  have  granted,  bargained,  sold,  released  and  con- 
firmed, and  by  these  presents  and  by  virtue  of  the  said  order  of  Court,  do 
grant,  bargain,  sell,  release  and  confirm  unto  the  said  Aaron  Hendricks 
and  to  his  heirs  and  assigns  All  that  the  said  Messuage,  Plantation  or  tract 
of  land  situate  in  the  townships  of  Hilltown  and  Rockhill  aforesaid, 
********  Containing  one  hundred  and  eleven  acres  and  one  hundred 
and  sixteen  perches  of  land,  be  the  same  more  or  less,  with  the  appur- 
tenances,  ********    jj^  Witness  Whereof,  the  said  Reuben  Y.  Strass- 


138  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

burger  and  Elias  Hartzell  have  hereunto  set  their  hands  and  seals  the  day 
and  year  first  above  written/ 

Reuben  Y.  Strassburger     (seal) 
Elias  Hartzell  (seal) 

Signed,  Sealed  and  Delivered 
in  the  presence  of 
Samuel  Leister 
E.  Shellenberger 

The  value  of  the  personal  and  movable  property  was  placed 
at  $9318.10,  which  added  to  that  received  from  the  sale  of  the 
farm,  gave  a  sum  of  $16388.47,  out  of  which  had  been  paid  a 
number  of  small  debts,  amounting  to  $1243.18,  which  left  a  bal- 
ance of  $15145.29  to  be  divided  among  the  heirs. 

The  Accounts  of  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  and  Elias  Hartzel 
Administrators  of  all  and  singular  the  goods  and  chatties  rights 
and  credits  which  were  of  John  A.  Strassburger  late  of  the  Town- 
ship of  Rockhill  in  the  County  of  Bucks  deceased- 

1860  Dr. 

The  Said  Accountants  charge  themselves  with  all  and 
singular  the  goods  and  chatties  rights  and  credits  which 
were  of  the  said  deceased  agreeably  to  an  Inventory  and 
Appraisement  thereof  filed   in   the   Registers   Ofifice   of 

said  County  Amounting  to $9114.19 

They  further  charge  themselves  with  the  following  Sums 
received  in  cash  Since  the  Inventory  and  Appraisement — 
Interest  on  the  Mortgage  Bond  of  Samuel  M.  Hager.  .        105.00 
Dividend  3  per  cent  on  Doylestown  Insurance  Company 

Stock    45.00 

Amount   received   of    David    Bean    not   charged   in    the 

Inventory    53.91 

Amount  of  Real  Estate  Sold  by  order  of  Orphans  Court     7070.37 


$16388.47 
The  said  Accountants  claim  credit  and  allowance  for  dis- 
bursements amounting  to 1243.18 

Balance  in  hand  of  Administrators 15145.29 


$16388.47 


1  Deed   Book   No.   119,  p.   101,   etc.     Doylestown,    Pennsylvania 

2  Original  paper  in  possession  of  the  family. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  139 

Bucks  County  S.  S. 

Elias   Hartzel   and   Reuben   Y.    Strassburger   the    foregoing 
Accountants  being  duly  affirmed  Say  that  the  foregoing  accounts 
is  a  just  and  true  Exhibit  of  the  Management  of  their  trust  as 
Administrators  of  J.  A.  Strassburger  late  of  Rockhill  Township 
Bucks  County  dec'd,  as  they  verily  believe 
Affirmed  and  Subscribed  before       ) 
Me  this  16**^  day  of  Mar.  A.  D.  1861) 
Jonathan  Davis       Register       ) 

Elias  Hartzel 

The  two  following  papers,  copied  from  originals  in  possession 
of  the  family,  show  how  this  amount  was  finally  distributed: 

Statement  of  Distribution  to  the  heirs  of  the  Estate  of  John  A.  Strass- 
burger deceased^ 

Nero  S.  Strassburger  Share  of  the 

advancement  &  personal  property $2139.45  1/3 

Amount  advanced    $1311.92 

Vandue  Bills  June  14  &  15'^ 883.44>^ 

do       do     Oct.       25'h      1.41 

do       do    Dec-      27th       35.77>4 

Widows  Share  in  Real  Estate 112.22-5/9 

Henry'^  Portion   112.22-5/9 

2457.00-1/9 
Nero  has  to  pay  into  the  Estate 317.54-7/9 

Gideon  S.  Strassburger  Share  of  the 

advancement  &  personal  property $2139.45  1/3 

Advaticement    $1000. 

1/8  of  the  300  Doyls.  Ins.  Shares 9.37>4 

Widow^  Share  in  Real  Estate 112.22-5/9 

Henrys  Portion  do  112.22-5/9 

1233.83-11/18 
Gideon  has  to  get  out  of  Estate $905.61-13/18 


1  Original  paper  in  possession  of  the  family. 


140  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  Share  of  the 

advancement  &  personal  property $2139.45  1/3 

Advancement    $1000. 

Vandue  Bills  June  14  &  15'^ 827.45 

do       do     Octr      25'h      40.36 

do       do     Dec      27t*>        46.43^ 

Widow^  Share  in  the  Real  Estate 112.22-5/9 

Henrys  Portion  do  112.22-5/9 

2138.69-31/36 
Reuben  has  to  get  out  of  the  Estate .75-17/36 

Andrev^  S.  Strassburger  Share  of  the 

advancement  &  personal  property $2139.45^ 

Amount  advanced $1000. 

Promissory   Note    700. 

Vandue  Bill  June  14  &  15*'' 347.59>4 

do       do  Octr      25  2.20^^ 

Ys  of  the  300  Doyls.  Ins.  Shares 9.37>^ 

Widows  Share  in  Real  Estate 112.22-5/9 

Henrys  Portion  do  112.22-5/9 

2283.62-11/18 

Andrew  has  to  pay  into  the  Estate $144.17-1/9 

Louisiana  Hartzell  Share  of  the 

advancement  &  personal  property $2139.45  J^ 

Amount  advanced    $1000.18 

Vandue  Bill  June  14  &  15'^ 97.49>^ 

do       do  Octr      25*^        10.59 

do       do  Deer      27  114.98^4 

Widows  Share  in  Real  Estate 112.22-5/9 

Henrys   Portion  ^o  112.22-5/9 

1447.69-31/36 
Louisiana  has  to  get  out  of  Estate $691.75-23/36 

Elizabeth  Shelly  Share  of  the 
advancement  &  personal  property $2139.45 3^ 


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ji^rc ^ — - —  —    i"    '    '      ''  ■■-^—r — :-_-_-*t-i::L-^. — # — __j_ . — . — ^^^ — 4 ____.•*_  i-  ."^ :?;___. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  141 

Amount  advanced    $1000.02 

Vandue  Bill  June  14  &  15'h 46.37 

do       do  Octr      25  2.99 

ys  of  the  300  Doyls.  Ins.  Stock 9.37^ 

Widows  Share  in  Real  Estate 112.22-5/9 

Henrys  Portion  do  112.22-5/9 

1283.20-11/18 

Elizth  has  to  get  out  of  the  Estate $856.24-8/9 

Mary  Hartzell  Share  of  the 

advancement  &  personal  property $2139.45^ 

Amount  advanced    $1000.30 

Vandue  Bill  June  14  &  15'^ 106.75 

do       do  Octr      25*^        2.96 

do       do  Deer.     27*^  46.32>4 

ys  of  the  300  Doyls.  Ins.  Shares 9.37>^ 

Widows  Share  in  Real  Estate 112.22-5/9 

Henrys   Portion  do  112.22-5/9 

Promissory  Note    500.00 

1890.19^^ 

Mary  has  to  get  out  of  the  Estate. . $249.26-5/18 

Henry  S.  Strassburger  Share  in  the  Real  Estate $785.59-6/9 

do  do  do      Personal    897.21-3/9 

do  do  Pro   Ratio    advancement 1242.24 


A  Whole  Share $2925.05 

Amount  advanced    $2625.50 

Vandue  Bill  June  14  &  15*^ 92.68 

do       "    Oct.        25         3.30 

ys  of  the  300  Doyls.  Ins.  Stock 9.37^ 


2730.851^ 

Balance  of  Henry^  full  share  in  the  personal  &  Real 

Estate     $194.19^4 


142  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Nero  has  to  pay  into  the  Estate $317.54-7/9 

Andrew         do  do     144.17-2/9 

Amount  to  receive $461.72 

Administrators  to  pay  out  to  Heirs 

Gideon  S.   Strassburger $905.61-13/18 

Reuben   Y.   Strassburger .75-17/36 

Louisiana  Strassburger  691.75-23/36 

Elizabeth  Shelly  856.24-8/9 

Mary  Hartzell    249.26-5/18 

Henry  S.  Strassburger 194.19^ 

Whole  Amount  to  pay  out  to  Heirs. $2897.83-18/36 

Widow^  Portion  out  of  Real  Estate $785.59-6/9 

"  Personal  do   897.21-3/9 


a         a 


Widows  Whole  Share    $1682.81 

Auditor's  Report  of  the  Estate  of  John  A.  Strassburger  Dec"^^ 

Amount  in  Administrators  hands  for  distribution 

Amount  of  Estate $15145.29 

Costs  Auditor    $20.00 

Advertising     2.00 

Clerk    3.00  25.00 

Balance  for  distribution $15120.29 

Share  of  Widow  l/9th   $  1680.03 

Balance  remaining  $13440.26 

Amount  of   advancement 9937.42 

Amount  for  distribution  among  heirs $23377.68 

Each  heir  }it\\ $  2922.21 

Share  of      Nero  S.  Strassburger $2922.21 

Advancement "      "  "  $  131 1.92 

Balance  due     "      "  "  $  1610.29 


1  Original  paper  in  possession  of  the  family. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  143 

Share  of     Louisiana  Hartzel $  2922.21 

.,               „.      u              u  ..         1000.18 

Advancement  ^^^2.03 

Balance  due  

Share  of     Elizabeth  Shelly    $  2922.21 

A  J               «f      "            "  1000.02 

Advancement  ^_       ^22.19 

Balance  due  

Share  of    Gideon  S.  Strassburger $  2922.21 

^^^;^^^^^^^^ :  :    :    '°°°°%  .922.21 

Balance  due  ^ 

Share  of     Reuben  Y.  Strassburger $  2922.21 

-rT^-;;  :;    ;;    ™,  1922.21 

Balance  due  ^ 

Share  of     Henry    Strassburger    $  2922.21 

^r-r'"  "  ''''°%    297.21 

Balance  due  ^ 

Share  of     Mary  Hartzel    $  2922.21 

"7^-:    :  '"^"^^  1921.91 

Balance  due  ^ 

Share  of     Andrew   Strassburger    $  2922.21 

A^T"'"  "  ^°^°%  1922.21 

Balance  due  ^ 

Amount  distribution   : $15120.29 

M.  Yardley 

Auditor 

Exceptions  Filed  Sept.  26th  1861. 

Reed  Dec«i  3^^  of  Elias  Hartzel  one  of  the  Adm^^  of  the  Estate  of 
John  A.  Strassburger  dec^  the  sum  of  three  Dollars  &  Twenty  five  cents 
as  fees  of  Orphans  Court 

^2  25  A.  B.  ROSENBERGER,  Clk 

Samuel  M.  Hager  desiring  to  be  relieved  of  the  mortgage 
debt,  held  by  the  estate  against  him,  incurred  when  he  purchased 
the  Strassburger  mill  and  another  tract  of  land,  entered  into  an 
agreement  with  the  Administrators  by  which  he  was  released  of 
the  mortgage  on  the  second  property/ 


iDeed  Book  109,  p.  599.     Doylestown,   Pennsylvania. 


144  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

By  the  spring  of  1864,  Reuben  Strassburger  and  his  brother- 
in-law,  Elias  Hartzell,  had  rendered  their  final  account,  having 
administered  the  estate  to  the  full  satisfaction  of  all  parties 
concerned. 

On  April  6,  of  the  last  named  year,  the  sons  and  daughters 
signed  the  accompanying  release,  thus  acknowledging  that  they 
had  each  received  from  the  Administrators  their  full  and  just  pro- 
portion of  their  father's  estate. 

Release:  Heirs  of  John  Andrew  Strassburger  to  Administrators 
OF  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  1864 

"KNOW  ALL  MEN  BY  THESE  PRESENTS  that  we  Gideon  S. 
Strassburger  of  the  city  of  Janesville  in  the  State  of  Wisconsin  by  Henry 
Troxel  his  Attorney  in  fact,  Nero  S.  Strassburger  of  the  Borough  of 
Allentown  in  the  County  of  Lehigh,  Henry  Strassburger  of  the  city  of 
Philadelphia,  Andrew  S.  Strassburger  of  Amity  Township  in  the  County 
of  Berks,  sons,  Louisiana  Strassburger  intermarried  with  Elias  Hart- 
zell of  Hilltown  Township  in  the  County  of  Bucks,  Elizabeth  Strass- 
burger intermarried  with  Aaron  F.  Shelly  of  the  City  of  Philadelphia  and 
Mary  Strassburger  intermarried  with  Jesse  D.  Hartzell  of  the  Township 
of  Rockhill  in  the  County  of  Bucks  all  of  the  State  of  Pennsylvania, 
daughters  of  the  said  John  A.  Strassburger,  late  of  the  Township  of 
Rockhill  in  the  County  of  Bucks  in  the  State  of  Pennsylvania,  deceased, 
who  died  intestate,  Do  Hereby  Acknowledge  that  we  and  each  of  us  have 
this  day  had  and  received  of  and  .from  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  and  Elias 
Hartzell,  Administrators  of  the  estate  of  the  said  John  A.  Strassburger, 
deceased,  the  sum  of  two  thousand  nine  hundred  and  twenty  two  dollars 
and  twenty  one  cents  in  full  satisfaction  and  payment  of  all  such  sum  or 
sums  of  money  share  or  shares  purports  or  dividends  which  were  owing 
payable  or  belonging  to  us  by  any  means  Whatsoever  for  or  on  account  of 
our  full  shares  parts  or  dividends  of  the  Real  and  Personal  Estate  of  our 
said  Father  deceased.  AND  THEREFORE  we  the  said  Nero  S.  Strass- 
burger, Gideon  S.  Strassburger  by  Henry  Troxel  his  Attorney  in  fact 
Henry  S.  Strassburger,  Andrew  S.  Strassburger,  Louisiana  Hartzell, 
Elizabeth  Shelly,  and  Mary  Hartzell  Do  By  These  Presents  Remise, 
Release  quit  claim  and  forever  discharge  the  said  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger 
and  Elias  Hartzell  their  Executors  and  Administrators  of  and  from  the 
said  shares  and  dividends  of  the  estate  aforesaid    *  *  *  *    IN  WITNESS 


^  V 


Noah  Strassburger, 
r.nrn  A[;iiTh,  1836. 
Died  July,    1S36. 


Catharine  STR.\ssr,rRGER. 
Born  Nov.  14,  1832. 
Died  Aim.  13,  1833. 


*sV\»/V 


Sarah  Strassburger, 
Born  Dec.  31,  1833. 
Died  July  15,  1834. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  145 

WHEREOF  we  have  hereunto  set  our  hands  and  seals  the  sixth  day  of 
April  A.  D.  One  thousand  Eight  hundred  and  Sixty  four.^ 

Gideon    Strassburger  Louisiana  Hartzell 

F.   L.   Strassburger  by  Elizabeth  Shelly 

their  Attorney  Henry  Mary  S.  Hartzell 

Troxel  A.  S.  Strassburger 

N.  S.  Strassburger  Henry  S.  Strassburger 

A  tombstone  with  the  following  inscription  was  placed  over 
the  grave  of  Catherine  Stout  Strassburger  in  the  graveyard  of 
Tohickon  Church: 

Catherine  S.  Strassburger 

Ehe  Gattin 

J.  A.  Strassburger 

Tochter  von  Heinrich  und  Elisabeth  Stout 

Sie  ist  geboren  den  4ten  November  A.  D.  1798  und 

Starbe  den  7ten  October  A.  D.  1838. 

Sie  brachte  ihr  Alter  auf  39  Jahre,  llmonath. 

und  3  Tage. 

Ruh  saust,  des  Lebens  miide 
In  deiner  stillen  Grust, 
Bis  des  Allmachtgen  Giite 
Sum  neuen  Segn  dich  rust. 
Dein  Bild  bleibt  hier  im  Leben 
Im  Segen  vor  uns  stehen, 
Bis  wir  im  bessern  Leben 
Binander  wiedersehn. 

[Translation] 

Rest  softly,  weary  of  life 

In  the  quiet  grave 

Till  the  favor  of  Almighty  God 

Calls  thee  up  higher 

Thine  image  remains  here  below 

To  stand  before  us  in  blessing, 

Till  we  in  the  better  life 

Shall  meet  one  another  again. 


1  Miscellaneous  Docket  No.   14,  p.  257.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


146  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

This  stone  became  worn  with  the  years  and  finally  broken, 
and  some  of  the  family  had  it  removed  and  a  new  stone  put  in  its 
place  with  an  inscription  in  English. 

Our  Mother 

Catherine  Strassburger 

Born 

Nov.  5,  1799 

Died 

OctV  7th  1838 

Aged  39  Yrs.  11  Mo 

and  2  Days. 

In  the  church  yard  at  Indian  Creek  Reformed  Church  stands 

a  stone  which  records: 

Our  Father 

Rev'^  J.  A.  Strassburger 

Born  Oct.  3,  1796 

Died  May  2,  1860 

As    a    minister     of    German 

Reformed    Church   he   served 

the    Indian    Creek,    Tohickon 

Charlestown  and  Ridge  Road 

Congregations      from      April 

1818  to  July  1854. 

It  was  at  the  request  and  earnest  solicitation  of  the  widow 
Anna,  that  Reverend  Strassburger  was  buried  at  Indian  Creek 
rather  than  at  Tohickon,  where  lay  his  first  wife.  She  had 
planned  to  be  buried  beside  him,  but  circumstances  willed  other- 
wise, as  after  his  death  she  went  to  live  in  Chester  County,  where 
she  died  and  was  buried  beside  her  first  husband  in  the  old  Union 
Meeting  Cemetery  at  Parkerford,  Chester  County.  The  stone  over 
her  grave  records  that  "Ann  Strassburger,  born  July  18,  1791, 
died  June  5,  1873,  aged  81  years,  10  mos.  16  d." 

Children  of  John  Andrezv  Strassburger  and  Catherine  Stout: 

1.  Rev.  Nero  S.  Strassburger,  born  August  7,  1819,  in  the  Reformed 
Parsonage  near  Sellersville,  and  died  in  Allentown,  June 
27,  1888.  He  was  one  of  the  most  widely  known  clergy- 
men oi  the  Reformed  church.     Graduating  from  Marshall 


Rev.  John   Andrew   Strassburger 

Born  Oct.  3,  1786. 

Died  May  2,  1860. 

As  a  minister  of  the  German   Reformed 

Church    he    served    the     Indian     Creek, 

Tohickon,  Charlestown  and  Ridge  Road 

Congregations    from   April,    1818,   to 

July,  1854. 


Catharine  Stout  Strassburger, 
Born  Nov.  5,  1798. 
Died  Oct.  7,   1838. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  147 

College  and  the  Theological  Seminary  at  Mercersburg,  he 
was  in    1847,   ordained   into   the  ministry  at   the   Goshen- 
hoppen  Church,  Montgomery  County,  by  the  Rev.  Daniel 
Weiser,  D.D.     He  was  called  to  the  pastorate  of  the  Frie- 
densburg  Reformed  Church  of  Berks   County,  and  while 
attending  to  his  duties  of  this  charge  he  labored  zealously 
as  a  home  missionary,  building  up  broken  down  congrega- 
tions at  Pricetown,  Boyertown,  and  at  Hubers,  all  in  Berks 
County.     About  1854,  he  organized  an  English  congrega- 
tion at  Pottstown,  supplying  at  same  time,  congregations 
at  Amity  and   Limerick.     In    1863,   he  became  pastor  of 
Zion's   Reformed    Church   at   Allentown,    Lehigh    County, 
with    which    charge    he    remained    until    1881,    when    he 
resigned.     He  took  an  active  part  in  church  government, 
serving  on  a  number  of  important  committees  of  the  Gen- 
eral Synod,  and  was  a  man  of  more  than  ordinary  literary 
attainments.     About  1851,  he  wrote  a  "Child's  Catechism," 
a  simplified  edition  of  the  Heidelberg  Catechism,  and  trans- 
lated the  book  into  German.     At  various  times  he  wrote 
criticisms  on  theological   subjects  which  were  extensively 
published  in  church  papers,  being  at  one  time  known  as  the 
critic  of  the  Reformed  Church.     The  degree  of  Doctor  of 
Divinity  was  conferred  upon  him  by  Marshall  College  in 
1887. 

He  was  Stated  Clerk  of  Goshenhoppen  Classis,  1848- 
1863;  o.f  East  Pennsylvania  Classis,  1864-1880,  and  of 
Lehigh  Classis  from  1880  until  his  death.  He  helped  to 
organize  the  Allentown  College  for  Women,  1867,  and 
taught  there  for  four  years,  and  for  a  time  conducted 
classes  in  Muhlenberg  College. 

He  married  November  9,  1818,  Diana  E.  Dickenshied, 
daughter  of  Charles  F.  and  Anna  Catherine  (Eberhard) 
Dickenshied,  of  Lower  Milford,  Lehigh  County,  Pa.  She 
died  August  15,  1890.  Reverend  Strassburger  died  in 
Allentown,  Pa.,  June  27,  1888.  Only  one  child  survives, 
Annie  Elizabeth,  who  resides  in  Allentown,  an  only  son, 
Charles  Edgar,  dying  in  infancy.^  Miss  Annie  Strass- 
burger resides  in  the  old  homestead.  No.  Z7  S.  7th  Street, 
Allentown,   Pa.     She  takes  an   active  part  in  the  church 


1  Charles   R.   Roberts,  History   of  Lehigh   County,  Pennsylvania,  Volume   III, 
p.  1303.  -  ^  . 


148  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

and  Sunday  School  of  Zion's  Reformed  congregation,  ever 
read}^  to  lend  her  aid  where  most  needed.  She  also  takes 
a  keen  interest  in  the  welfare  and  betterment  of  the  city 
and  during  the  World  War  rendered  most  splendid  service 
in  the  Red  Cross  and  other  war  activities. 

2.  Louisianna    Strassburger,    born    November   24,    1820,    Rockhill 

Township,  Bucks  County,  Pa. ;  died  January  4,  1899 ;  mar- 
ried November  10,  1839,  Elias  Hartzell,  son  of  Andrew  and 
Margaret  (Fosbenner)  Hartzell,  born  June  5,  1814;  died 
January  26,  1875.  He  was  a  son  of  Heinrich  and  grand- 
son of  Heinrich  Hartzell,  the  pioneer  settler  in  Rockhill, 
Bucks  County.  Buried  in  Indian  Creek  Reformed  church- 
yard. Issue :  Cornelius,  born  August  14,  1840,  died  March, 
1917,  married  1860,  Elizabeth  Delp  and  had:  Elmer, 
Imelda,  Samuel,  Kate,  Frank,  and  Elizabeth ;  Andrew  S., 
born  October  20,  1841,  died  December  2,  1911,  married 
Kate  Derstine,  died  March,  1897;  Francis  S.,  born  July 
28,  1843,  died  April  4,  1908,  unmarried;  Emeline,  born 
November  1,  1845,  died  March  31,  1914,  married  Decem- 
ber 3,  1870,  Jonas  G.  Hangey ;  Reuben  S.,  born  1848,  died 
May  3,  1903,  unmarried;  Lewis  S.,  born  April,  1851,  died 
September,  1860. 

3.  Gideon  Strassburger,  born  February  26,  1822,  Rockhill  Town- 

ship, Bucks  County,  Pa. ;  died,  1872,  La  Crosse,  Wisconsin ; 
married  Fanny  Wood.  He  emigrated  West  when  a  young 
man,  locating  first  in  Janesville,  Wisconsin,  later  removing 
to  La  Crosse,  where  he  died  in  the  latter  part  of  1872.  He 
married  in  the  West,  Miss  Fanny  Wood,  who  survived  him. 
Their  only  daughter  Eleanor,  born  1850,  died  August  27, 
1868,  aged  18  years. 

4.  REUBEN   Y.   STRASSBURGER,   born   at   Bridgeton,   Bucks 

County,  Pa.,  October  1,  1823;  died  August  14,  1872, 
Schwenkville,  Pa. ;  married  January  21,  1847,  ELIZA- 
BETH Z.  SCHWENK,  born  September  24,  1821;  died 
October  15,  1907. 

5.  A  son  born  April  8,  1825,  lived  only  three  hours.     Buried  Stout's 

graveyard,  Perkasie,  Pa. 

6.  Elizabeth  Strassburger,  born  February  25,  1826,  at  either  Sellers- 

ville  or  Perkasie,  Bucks  County;  died  November  9,  1880, 
Philadelphia,  Pa.;  married  March  12,  1846,  Dr.  Aaron  F. 


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THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  149 

Shelly,  son  of  Francis  and  Catherine  (Funk)  Shelly, 
born  Great  Swamp,  Bucks  County,  February  10,  1823; 
died  October  13,  1883,  Philadelphia,  Pa.  Issue:  Mary 
Catherine,  born  February  1,  1847,  died  April"  26,  1906, 
married  Alexander  S.  Heister ;  Rebecca  K.,  born  July  3, 
1854,  married  June  20,  1876,  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  born 
February  16,  1841,  died  January  10,  1903;  John  Andrew 
Francis,  died  in  infancy;  Oliver,  born  May  25,  1860,  died 
March  25,  1813,  married  Minerva  Catherine  (Hartzell) 
Shober. 

Henry  S.  Dotterer  was  a  local  historian  and  author 
and  in  1895-6,  accompanied  by  Mrs.  Dotterer,  made  a  trip 
to  Europe  to  carry  out  a  long  cherished  plan  to  make 
researches  in  the  Archives  and  libraries,  particularly  in  Hol- 
land, Germany  and  Switzerland,  relative  to  early  immigra- 
tion from  these  countries  to  America  and  to  collect  mate- 
rial on  the  history  of  the  German  Reformed  in  Pennsylva- 
nia. It  was  while  on  this  trip  that  he  collected  the  data 
relating  to  the  Strassburger  and  Dotterer  families  in 
Europe  and  to  whose  notes,  both  printed  and  manuscript, 
we  are  indebted  for  much  of  the  information  used  in  com- 
piling this  history.  He  also  collected  material  concerning 
the  early  history  of  the  German  Reformed  Church  in  Penn- 
sylvania. For  three  years  was  Assistant  Treasurer  of  the 
Philadelphia  Commercial  Museum,  which  place  he  resigned 
December  31,  1902,  to  accept  the  position  of  Private  Secre- 
tary to  Governor-elect  Samuel  W.  Pennypacker,  He  was 
taken  suddenly  ill  and  died  January  10,  1903.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Dotterer  had  but  one  child,  a  son,  Ralph  Shelly  Dot- 
terer, born  May  26,  1878,  who  died  Aug.  17,  1878. 

7.  Henry  Stout   Strassburger,  born  November  2,   1827,   Perkasie, 

Pa.;  died  November  28,  1900,  Philadelphia,  Pa.;  married 
September  22,  1860,  by  his  brother  Rev.  Nero  S.  Strass- 
burger, to  Margaret  Rae  Graeff,  born  October  2,  1836. 
Resided  in  Philadelphia  and  for  many  years  connected  with 
the  Oriental  Spice  Mills.  Issue:  Harry  Stout,  born  April 
29,  1861;  Frank  Graeff,  born  April  27,  1864;  Carrie  Jane, 
born  January  1,  1866,  married  September  4,  1888,  Harry 
Ellwood  Paisley,  of  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

8.  A  daughter,  born  November  21,  1829,  lived  11  hours.     Buried 

Stout's  graveyard,  Perkasie,  Pa. 


150  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

9.  Mary  Strassburger,  born  December  20,  1830;  died  December  26, 

1907 ;  married  September  29,  1849,  Jesse  D.  Hartzell,  born 
January  5,  1827;  died  February  7,  1894.  Issue:  Milton 
Henry,  died  in  Michigan,  married  Priscilla  Newton  of 
Waverly;  John  Andrew,  born  September  20,  1851,  died 
October  12,  1919,  married  October  16,  1879,  Mary  M.  Reiff, 
resided  in  Perkasie,  Pa.;  Francis  A.,  died  about  1891,  mar- 
ried Hattie  Sheetz,  o.f  Philadelphia;  Minerva  C.  (deceased), 
married  Eugene  Schober ;  Alice  E.,  married  John  F.  Stover, 
of  Perkasie,  Pa. ;  Jordan  H.,  married  Etta  Palmer,  reside  in 
Perkasie,  Pa. 

10.  Catherine  Strassburger,  born  November  16,  1832;  died  August 

17,  1834.     Buried  Tohickon  churchyard. 

11.  Andrew  Strassburger,  born  December  31,  1833;  died  May  23, 

1895;  married  September  25,  1858,  by  his  brother  Rev. 
Nero  S.  Strassburger,  to  Margaret  Amelia  Lorah,  daughter 
of  William  and  Harriet  Lorah  of  Weavertown,  Berks 
County,  Pa.  Issue:  Elmer  Lorah,  born  April  21,  1861, 
died  April  8,  1862 ;  William  Henry,  born  April  3,  1863,  died 
April  19,  1895 ;  Harriet  Catherine,  born  September  13, 
1865,  married  Walter  Roberts,  of  Allentown;  Ada  Estella, 
born  January  30,  1868,  died  October  21,  1872;  Lorah,  born 
March  30,  1871,  married  March  30,  1895,  Emma  Bailey 
Halloway,  of  Weavertown,  and  had  issue:  Catherine 
Amelia,  born  September  27,  1897,  and  Grace  Halloway, 
born  February  13,  1904,  reside  near  Douglassville,  Pa.; 
Mahlon  Ludwig,  born  September  16,  1873,  married  Cather- 
ine Levan ;  Preston  EJwood,  born  March  30,  1877,  died 
January  13,  1880. 

12.  Sarah   Strassburger,   a  twin  to  Andrew,   born   December  31, 

1833;  died  July  15,  1834. 

13.  Noah  Strassburger,  born  February  23,  1836;  died  July  11,  1836, 

aged  4  months  and  18  days.  Buried  in  Tohickon  church- 
yard. 
REUBEN  Y.  STRASSBURGER,  third  son  of  Rev.  John 
Andrew  Strassburger  and  his  wife,  Catherine  Stout,  was  born 
at  Bridgetown,  Rockhill  Township,  Bucks  County,  Pennsyl- 
vania, on  October  1,  1823,  and  baptized  the  same  year,  as 
shown  by  the  baptismal  records  of  Tohickon  Reformed  Church, 
where  the  name  appears  as  "Rubin."     None  of  the  children  of 


Reuben  Y.Strassburger. 


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Wave?;y:  J'-h=^  Andrev^-,  Ix;!-  Sv,Mcn:b.^r  20.  1851,,  died 
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.-e?iv,vH!  ;:;  ^^crkvisie,  Pa.'  Fra^ici.;  A;  died  nbont.  189:>.  mar- 
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murdiA^  Et^g'ene  Schober ;  Alice  V..,  ma;  r^?<1- Joh-!  F.  Stcver. 
'  f  Fprk;''-;c,  Pa,;  jordji);  K..  niarncd  Flta  Palmer,  reside  in 
.Perko^;-;.   Pa. 

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yard. 

-AP"'BI-:n  Y.  PlP-lASSBffRGKR,  iPird  s(m  (P  iP-v.   ]\?]m 

Ax^*:Pr'■    ^y  i'>'?Purgi:r  a.nd   hi?   v.ilp„   Catherine'   pif^^G^   \-vO'    v'njiTx 

at    P-  '^^-y  v:t^     R'xk.ljPi    To.vT.ship>,    Buck;5    i'^HU:-.-      i':.fvUi->i- 

Taiii;.     "^^    '  :y.^  f.-.:r    F   IP  Ft,    and    bapp^.ed    the    :A.::m;:    ■^^•i^y    a,':- 

^ho^^;:  ^     -P    ■..  i'-'i-niial  record^  '.;i  TpP<:v-';:>   P-Po:?-:-- .     'O^-^m.:'"^., 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  151 

Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  except  the  fourth  son,  Henry, 
were  given  more  than  the  one  Christian  name  at  baptism,  though  the 
other  sons  assumed  middle  initials  later  in  life.  The  story  is  told 
in  one  branch  of  the  family  that  Reuben  originally  intended  that 
his  middle  name  should  be  Yeager,  after  his  grandmother,  but 
that  a  strong  regard  for  a  relative  and  prominent  pastor  named 
Young,  who  resided  in  Allentown,  led  him  to  adopt  that  name 
instead.  Another  tradition  is  that  at  one  time  the  two  brothers, 
Nero  and  Reuben,  were  discussing  the  fact  that  neither  had  been 
given  a  middle  name  at  baptism,  and  both  wishing  to  use  two 
initials,  as  was  the  custom,  each  decided  to  take  a  family  name, 
the  elder  son,  Nero,  assumed  that  of  his  mother,  Stout,  and  was 
ever  thereafter  known  as  Nero  S.,  or  N.  S.,  while  Reuben  took  the 
name  of  his  grandmother,  Yeager,  using  only  the  initial  "Y." 
While  it  would  seem  more  natural  that  he  should  choose  a  family 
name  rather  than  that  of  a  relative,  at  present  writing  it  is  not 
known  for  a  certainty  which  he  selected,  and  since  it  is  so  doubtful, 
we  have  in  these  pages  referred  to  him  as  Reuben  Y.,  for  it  was 
in  this  manner,  or  as  R.  Y.,  he  wrote  his  own  signature. 

When  he  was  eight  years  old  Reuben  was  sent  to  school  to 
the  old  Fluck's  Schoolhouse,  where  he  generally  arrived  full  of 
mischief;  and  later,  to  more  advanced  institutions  of  learning, 
where  he  acquired  an  excellent  education.  He  wrote  a  scholarly 
Spencerian  hand ;  his  books  and  accounts  show  great  skill  and  are 
models  of  neatness  and  accuracy.  He  taught  in  his  youth  in  the 
old  Octagon  Schoolhouse  near  Perkasie,  long  since  torn  down. 

Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  married,  January  21,  1847,  at 
Schwenkville,  Pa.,  Elizabeth  Ziegler  Schwenk,  daughter  of  Jacob 
Schwenk  and  his  wife,  Magdalena  Ziegler,  who  was  born  Sep- 
tember 24,  1821,  and  died  October  11,  1907.  The  ceremony  was 
performed  by  his  father,  who  issued  this  certificate: 

To  All  Whom  It  May  Concern. 

This  is  to  certify,  that  on  the  21st  day  of  January  in  the  year  of 

our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  Forty  Seven  no  lawful  hinder- 

ance  appearing,  we  R.  Y.  Strassburger  And  Eliz^h  Z.  Schwencken  were 

joined  together  in  the  HolyBands  of  Matrimony,  and  pronounced  husband 

and  WIFE  by  me,  ^    ^    ^ 

J.  A.  Strassburger 

Minister  of  the  Gospel. 


152  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

For  the  first  few  months  after  their  marriage,  Reuben  Y, 
Strassburger  and  his  wife  appear  to  have  resided  in  Schwenk- 
ville,  or  Perkiomen  (as  the  village  was  more  frequently  called  in 
those  days),  in  Montgomery  County,  Pa.  That  his  wife  had 
come  to  him  well  supplied  with  those  household  articles  so  dear 
to  every  German  bride,  is  made  known  to  us  by  two  interesting 
old  papers  that  have  been  preserved.  Three  months  after  their 
marriage,  Reuben  made  a  list  of  the  contents  of  their  home,  heading 
the  paper  "Elizabeth  Strassburger's  Furniture  Goods,  March  11, 
1847."  This  paper  being  rather  carelessly  written,  and  having 
some  words  misspelled,  he  rewrote  it  in  his  own  fine  Spencerian 
hand,  correcting  the  spelling,  and  dating  this  new  paper  "Perkio- 
men, March  23,  1847,"  and  designating  it  "Memorandum  of  House 
Furniture."  The  following  copy  is  taken  from  the  first-mentioned 
paper: 

Elizabeth  Strassburger's 

Furniture  Goods 

March  11,  1847 

Check's  Chalf   Bags,   Tow  Linin  ■» 

Flax  Linin  Table  Cloth's  &c  j 

Quilts,    Comforts,    Cotton    Laps,  i  .^o  j* 
Cover  Lets  Blankets  &c.                ) 

Bill  of  Queens  Ware 24.49 

1     Large  &  Small  Copper  Kettel.  .  .  , 12.00 

Cash    150.00 

1     Mahogany  Look'g  Glass 5.25 

1     Waiter  &  Snuffer  Tray   2.25 

95  lbs   Holloware    3.32 

1     Looking  Glass    1-12 

1     pr  Shovel  &  Tongs 1-43 

1     Meat  Saw  95 

1  Coffee  Mill  72 

2  Boilers   2.55 

1  pr  Carvers,  &  Butcher  Knive 72 

2  Doz  Knives  &  Forks 3.79 

2     Iron  Spoons   10 

2     Candle  Sticks  &  Snuffers    90 

1     Doz  Table  Spoons  50 

J^  Doz  do  Tea    do   65 

1     Tea   Kettel    1.43 


Elizabeth  Ziegler  Schwenk  Strassburger.  ^'^ 


V   ■■    ..'v  j<jr:i  fvnv  nioiubs  after  tlieir  n^jutriage,  Re\ih(:n  Y. 

'-'\  i--:k::->z-.r   -tDd  his  wile  ^^ppear  \o   a^ve  re-ided   ixi  Scav^eiik-- 

'.,;;:•:„  ■•r  Pc;!aom.::rt  (a^  ibi  village  '.•vv»>-  a^^^-i  ^reoueiitiy  i.a.lle':]  in 

v.:^v.>;  vl<.'}-S;,  in  Monigoniifry   Couni\.    r'a^      luat  hi'?  wife  had 

o^nie  to  him  w'dl  suppUed  v/ith  tho-^e  b''uv*:^uo>d  anidts  so  dear 

\rj  v'^i'ry  Grnrtan  bride,  is  niacie  knuwn  1<,)  u>  by  two  interesting 

oid  paper?  that  bc.»'»j  beep  piesi^rved.     Three  inovjths  hfrer  their 

-.  RcuhpA  made  a  list  of  the  contents  oi  Iheir  h'Kiie,  heading 

,    r  ''I'l.wObeth  Srrassburger's  FurDituie  Goods.  March  11, 

iPA'K'     I'hiti  paper  being  rather  care]e?^sly  wntte-n.  and  having 

some  voids  Rus:'fipelh:d.  h-  :'^v\-roie  iX  b,  his  ovvXt  hne  Spencerian 

hand,  correcting  ftif:  sptdJin:;,.  and  dating  this  new  paper  "Perkio- 

lueih  March  23,  '$-7/-  a^id  -ic-siynating  il  "MeinorauQum  of  Reuse 

Furrdiir^\'"    'The  foliosv...;,;     „r  ■.  k  t^xken  from  the  hird-meii Honed 


■^  ■    _  .  _  .    .    , .v"./  *• 

Bill  ct  Ouecus  Ws.r^    ,  


2'?,.lw 

:i2.0d 

hXt.^ 

5.2S 

2.25 

3.32 

Li2 

h4.3 

1     iargp  &  Sinali  iJ-'-^Pr  '  ...    -    

Cash      ■  - ,..,..,.., 

1  ?.h>h\igf:ny  Lo-:*k''.;  {tli^.::-                     .....'.       ... 

l  W-iher  &  Sntjffnr  Tra\ 

■-'5  ^bs   iiuliowar-:;    = .,..,.,.. 

1  !!x>':i\ing   Lilar^s    ...      .....  ■•  •  ■ 

J      pr  Shovti  &  "io^i'^h .  ■    

;     Meat  Saw ■    . ^5 

'     ;...'oft>e  .MUI   .  , ;  .  72 

2  Bciki?  '■  -         2,5^ 

!      pr  Carvtf^>^.   «  Bu?ch€t    Kaive, •'^^ 

2     Doz  K-ivr:-  d:   Fork-i 3.r9 

2     Il^!il   SpO^'-uS •     ■  id 

.'     ("rmi'ic  Sri,:l-.<;  4v-     'i.  MlrT:-    ......  .    .  y(j 

{     Oo^  Taolc  Sui;-:-  ... .  SO 


.^.tXf^'^SXi^^IXqfir.nr.-^ .. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  153 

Tin  Ware   4.26 

1     Plate  &  Iron 65 

Brushes    • 1-15 

53^  lbs  L    Handle   pan         10     55 

5     do  Stove  pans                   15     75 

13  do  Flat  Irons                      6     78 

2y2  lbs  Small  pan                  28     70 

Am't  Bro't   Forward    319.82 

Cedar    Ware    6.1 1 

Feathers  68  lbs.   30 20.40 

Bed  Ticking  ZlYz  yds  15 5.62 

35  lbs  Beef  5 1-75 

10  Yds  Carpets  18 1-80 

1     pp  Crash 93 

1     Steel  Garden  Spade   56 

1     Coffee   Roaster    50 

1     Garden  Hoe  37 

Earthen  Ware   86 

Comon  Tea  Ware  &  Crockery,  Ware 8.00 

Cash     March   29,    1847 30.00 

Cash  p'i  Jesse  Schillich 5.00 

401.72 

Spinning  Wheel  &  Reel 5.25 


406.97 


3^  Cwt   Wht   Flour 1.50 

>^  do    Rye  do    1.00 

2     Hams    1.00 

1     Shoulder    1.25 

Lard    3.00 

10  lbs.  Tallow 80 


$11.55  11.55 


$418.52 
111^  yds  Tow  Linin  20 2.20 

$420.72 
Coffee,  Sugar,  Tea  Salt  &c  (Gratis)  Free 


154  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  during  his  lifetime,  had 
given  to  each  of  his  children  a  generous  sum  of  money  no  doubt 
with  the  view  of  establishing  his  sons  in  business,  or,  by  this 
means,  enabling  them  to  build  or  buy  suitable  homes  upon  their 
marriage,  and  providing  liberal  dowers  for  the  daughters.  Reuben, 
therefore,  had  received  $1000.00,  and  it  probably  was  with  this 
money  that  he  bought  a  tract  of  land  in  Hilltown  Township, 
where  he  erected,  shortly  after  his  marriage,  a  large  stone  building 
to  be  used  as  a  store  and  warehouse,  one  end  and  the  upper  part 
of  which  was  the  residence,  this  being  the  manner  in  which  country 
stores  were  built  and  conducted.  It  stands  on  high  ground  at  the 
intersection  of  two  highways,  a  long  building,  two  stories  and  a 
half  high,  to  which  dormer  windows  have  since  been  added.  They 
had  moved  into  the  house  and  were  settled  before  the  end  of  the 
year,  for  it  was  here,  on  November  28th,  their  oldest  child,  Clara 
Olivia,  was  born.  This  continued  to  be  their  home  for  twenty 
years,  during  which  time  six  other  children  came  to  bless  their 
union. 

A  paper  wherein  he  records,  in  his  own  handwriting,  the 
birth  and  baptism  of  his  two  eldest  children,  is  one  of  the  prized 
possessions  of  the  family. 

"Clara  Olivia  Strassburger  was  born  on  the  Twenty  eighth  clay  of 
November  in  the  year  of  Our  Lord  One  Thousand  eight  hundred  and 
Forty  Seven— in  Hilltown,  Bucks  County  and  State  of  Pennsylvania. 

Was  baptized  on  the  Nineteenth  day  of  March  A.  D.  1848." 

"Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  was  born  on  the  Fifteenth  day  of  Octo- 
ber in  the  year  of  Our  Lord  One  Thousand  eight  Hundred  and  forty-nine 
in  Hilltown,  Bucks  County. 

Was  baptized  on  the  25'i>  day  of  December  A.  D.  1849. 

During  the  Civil  War  quantities  of  supplies  consisting  of 
boxes  of  food,  bandages,  etc.,  were  forwarded  from  this  Hilltown 
home  to  the  Union  troops  and  prisoners  in  the  South.  Reuben  Y, 
Strassburger  was  for  twenty-two  years  superintendent  of  the  Sun- 
day school  which  held  its  services  in  the  Hilltown  Schoolhouse. 

In  1869,  he  disposed  of  the  store  and  house  in  Hilltown  to  a 
good  advantage  and  returned  to  Schwenkville,  where  in  1845  he 


<^^^^y^  "/?'^^>'^/^/^  /'f'Y^'^  ^^^^'/  ^^mC^    <:/a.-^-^ 


/<<^..v 


'^  ^i^/i//"  //e^^J^l^ 


Poem  in  appreciation,  in  his  own  handwriting-,  hy  R.  Y.  Strasshiirs^er, 
to  his  wife,  EHzaheth  Schwenk,  1852. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  155 

had  met,  at  a  young  people's  frolic,  the  rosy-cheeked  girl  who  two 
years  later  became  his  wife.  Here  he  purchased  a  house  and 
engaged  in  the  coal  and  lumber  trade  with  his  brother-in-law, 
Abraham  G.  Schwenk,  under  the  firm  name  of  Schwenk  &  Strass- 
burger,  and  they  soon  built  up  a  most  successful  business. 

After  their  removal  to  their  new  home,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Strass- 
burger  became  identified  with  the  public  and  religious  life  of  the 
town.  He  was  a  man  of  sterling  integrity,  of  a  deeply  religious 
nature,  and  in  politics  a  Republican.  Both  he  and  his  wife  were 
members  of  the  Indian  Creek  Reformed  Church,  of  which  he 
was  an  elder  for  a  great  many  years. 

Elizabeth  Schwenk  Strassburger  was  a  splendid  Christian 
woman,  charitable,  unassuming,  never  obtrusive,  patient,  and  ever 
depreciating  her  own  sacrifices.  No  one  ever  left  her  door  in  want. 
When  asked  why  she  allowed  herself  to  be  so  frequently  imposed 
upon,  she  would  reply,  "Rather  that,  than  I  should  miss  a  worthy 
one."  She  had  a  rare  personality,  well  educated,  and  most  assidu- 
ous in  Bible  reading ;  her  great  old-fashioned  German  Bible  shows 
much  service,  although  she  was  proficient  in  the  English  language 
as  well,  and,  like  her  husband,  excelled  in  penmanship.  Her  hus- 
band penned  these  lines,  dedicating  them 

To  My  Wife  Elizabeth 

Sweet  memory,  wafted  by  thy  gentle  gale 

Oft  up  the  stream  of  Time,  I  turn  my  sail 

To  view  the  fairy  haunts  of  long-lost  hours 

Blest  with  far  greener  shades,  far  fresher  flowers 

Hence  away,  nor  dare  intrude ! 

In  this  secret  shadowy  cell 
Musing  MEMORY  loves  to  dwell, 

With  her  sister  Solitude 
Far  from  the  busy  world  she  flies, 

To  taste  that  peace  the  world  denies. 
Entranced  she  sits,  from  youth  to  age; 

Reviewing  lifes  eventful  page; 
And  noting,  ere  they  fade  away 

The  little  lines  of  yesterday. 

R.  Y.  Strassburger 
Hiltown  Jany  21^^  1352 


156  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

On  August  14,  1872,  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  was  accident- 
ally killed  by  falling  from  a  car  in  his  own  warehouse  and  crushed 
under  the  wheels  of  the  moving  train.  He  was  buried  in  the  grave- 
yard at  Indian  Creek  Reformed  Church,  in  the  lot  adjoining  his 
father's  last  resting  place.  It  is  said  that  his  funeral  was  the 
largest  ever  attended  in  that  community. 

In  the  Herald  and  Free  Press,  a  Norristown  newspaper, 
under  date  of  Thursday,  August  22,  1872,  there  appeared  the 
following :  ^ 

Funeral — Mr,  Strassburger,  accidentally  killed  on  the  railroad  at 
Schwenkville  last  Thursday,  was  buried  Saturday  at  Indian  Field^  burying 
ground,  in  Franconia  Township.  Mr.  Strassburger's  sudden  and  unlooked 
for  death  removes  from  our  country  a  very  prominent  business  man  and 
deprives  a  large  family  of  the  love  and  attention  of  a  devoted  husband  and 
father. 

As  he  did  not  leave  a  will.  Letters  of  Administration  were 
issued  to  his  wife,  Elizabeth,  and  eldest  son,  Jacob  Andrew.  He 
had  acquired  a  considerable  estate  during  his  life.  He  held  a 
number  of  shares  in  the  Quakertown  and  Sellersville  Turnpike, 
Hilltown  and  Sellersville  Turnpike,  Springhouse  and  Hilltown 
Turnpike,  Perkiomen  and  Sumneytown  Turnpike,  North  Penn 
Railroad,  and  United  States  bonds  to  the  value  of  $11,219.00. 
In  addition,  he  held  a  half  interest  in  the  firm  of  Schwenk  & 
Strassburger.  The  final  account,  as  returned  to  the  Orphans'  Court 
at  Norristov/n,  Pa.,  by  administrators  November  11,  1874,  showed 
that  the  entire  estate  amounted  to  $27,673.63.'' 

Elizabeth  Schwenk  Strassburger's  parents  and  grandparents 
had  been  active  and  influential  members  of  Keely's  church,  which 
stood  about  a  mile  distant  from  Schwenkville,  the  same  building 
being  used  by  both  the  Reformed  and  Lutheran  congregations. 
The  Schwenks  were  of  the  Lutheran  faith,  and  when  this  con- 
gregation removed  their  place  of  worship  to  Schwenkville,  her 
father,  Abraham  Schwenk,  lent  his  aid  both  personally  and  finan- 
cially to  the  building  of  the  new  Lutheran  Church.     Later  when 


'^Herald  and  Free  Press,  Thursday,  August  22,  1872.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  This  is  an  error.     The  interment  was  in  Indian  Creek  Reformed  churchyard. 

3  Original  Papers  in  possession  of  Perry  B.  Strassburger. 


T 


'AMILY 


157 


the  Reformed  branch 
of  worship  m 

lIpOI'l       '  '    ■ 


establish  a  place 

tbem  the  ground 

Church,  and 

^vindow  in 

•tarsds  on 

^s  the 


'"   -'Cif  and  Elisabeth  Zieglcr  Schwenk- 

^  i:r,  horn  November  28,  1847;  died  1852. 
1-iiiitowri,  T :  •  >'§  ^..  Pa.  Buried  liidkn  Creek  Reformed 
Church,  Montg&^ry  Co,,  Pa. 

JACOB  ANDREWf  "giASSBURGER,  born  October  15.  1849; 
died  March  30, | ^8;  married  December  15,  1880.  MARY 
J.  BRAVER,  bf:§Jant.iarv  16,  1856;  died  July  7,  1913. 

Anna  Elizabeth  bUam^rg(ir,    born    September    2,    1851;    died 

February  \7,  IPiC  married  Benjamin   I^idy,  born   1851, 

died  July  4,  IS'.'o,^  He  was  for  many  years  cashier  of  the 

F,  .-.-^ -.•(r.-    "' jio*»^   Bank.     Their  only  child  was  Robert 

njarried  but  died  without  issue. 

virger,    born   DecembiT    2,    1852;    died    iu 


g   Spare,  1x)rn 
-rite  Wett- 
r26,  1917, 
13,  1918. 


%,■: 


IS 

*"  5 

^  o 

5  S 

•Ci 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  157 

the  Reformed  branch  of  Keely's  desired  also  to  establish  a  place 
of  worship  in  the  village,  Mrs.  Strassburger  gave  them  the  ground 
upon  which  was  erected  the  Heidelberg  Reformed  Church,  and 
later  placed  in  the  church  a  beautiful  stained  glass  window  in 
memory  of  her  husband.  This  handsome  stone  edifice  stands  on 
the  hill  just  back  of  the  old  home  which,  then,  as  now,  faces  the 
main  street.  After  a  few  years  she  disposed  of  her  property  in 
Schwenkville  and  went  to  live  with  her  daughter,  Mrs.  Wilfred  L. 
Stauffer,  of  Norristown,  with  whom  she  remained  until  her  death 
on  October  11,  1907,  in  her  eighty-seventh  year.  She  was  buried  in 
Riverside  Cemetery,  Norristown,  the  Reverends  Peter  S.  Fisher, 
S.  M.  K.  Huber,  F.  Berkemeyer,  and  Jacob  Kuhn  officiating  at  the 
ceremony,  which  was  conducted  in  both  German  and  English. 

Children  of  Reuben  Y .  Strasshurgcr  and  Elizabeth  Ziegler  Schwenk: 

1.  Clara  Olivia  Strassburger,  born  November  28,  1847;  died  1852, 

Hilltown,  Bucks  Co.,  Pa.  Buried  Indian  Creek  Reformed 
Church,  Montgomery  Co.,  Pa. 

2.  JACOB  ANDREW  STRASSBURGER,  born  October  15,  1849; 

died  March  30,  1908;  married  December  15,  1880,  MARY 
J.  BEAVER,  born  January  16,  1856;  died  July  7,  1913. 

3.  Anna  Elizabeth  Strassburger,    born    September    2,    1851 ;    died 

February  17,  1910;  married  Benjamin  Leidy,  born  1851, 
died  July  4,  1896.  He  was  for  many  years  cashier  of  the 
Pennsburg  National  Bank.  Their  only  child  was  Robert 
Clement  Leidy,  married  but  died  without  issue. 

4.  John  Henry  Strassburger,    born    December    2,     1852;    died    in 

infancy. 

5.  Katherine  Augusta  Strassburger,  born  January  18,  1854 ;  died  in 

Philadelphia;  married  September  10,  1878,  in  Schwenk- 
ville, Pa.,  Charles  M.  Spare,  born  August  29,  1849,  died 
January  6,  1918.  They  settled  at  Geneva,  N.  Y.,  where  Mr. 
Spare  was  General  Agent  for  the  Philadelphia  and  Read- 
ing Rail  Road  for  New  York  State.  Issue :  Charles  Roscoe 
Spare,  born  June  14,  1879;  Reuben  Young  Spare,  born 
June  29,  1882,  married  January  28,  1914,  Marguerite  Wett- 
stein  and  have  issue:  Betty  Spare,  born  September  26,  1917, 
and  Dorothy  Christine  Spare,  born  May  13,  1918. 


158  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

6.  James  Strassburger,  born  September  5,   1855 ;  died  May,   1860. 

Buried  beside  his  grandfather,  Rev.  J.  A.  Strassburger, 
Indian  Creek  Reformed  Churchyard. 

7.  Magdalena  Schwenk  Strassburger,  born  October  16,  1858;  mar- 

ried September  7,  1881,  at  Schwenkville,  Pa.,  Wilfred  Lud- 
wig  Stauffer,  of  Norristown,  Pa.,  born  July  28,  1857,  Vice 
President  of  the  James  Lees  Company,  Bridgeport,  Pa. 
Mrs.  Staufifer  is  a  member  of  the  Valley  Forge  Chapter, 
Daughters  American  Revolution,  and  was  the  instigator,  in 
1907,  of  the  Valley  Forge  Marker  for  the  unknown  dead. 
During  the  World  War  she  served  on  the  American  Red 
Cross  Canteen  from  June  1,  1917  to  November  11,  1919, 
and  upon  its  discontinuance  was  transferred  to  the  Ameri- 
can Red  Cross  Canteen  Reserves  November  1,  1919. 
Children:  Wilfred  Ludwig  Staufifer,  born  July  29,  1883, 
died  Jan.  5,  1885;  Mary  Elizabeth  Staufifer,  born  June  11, 

1885,  married  December  14,  1909,  John  Hyatt  Naylor,  born 

1886,  issue:  Mary  Elizabeth,  born  September  9,  1911,  John 
Hyatt,  born  November  24,  1917;  Charles  Rodger  Staufifer, 
born  April  7,  1887,  married  August  11,  1911,  Florence 
Rosella  Franey,  issue :  Magdalena  Strassburger,  born  Au- 
gust 16,  1912,  Louise  Rosella,  born  February  26,  1916;  Paul 
Strassburger  Staufifer,  born  February  10,  1889,  married 
June  30,  1913,  Alice  Piersol  Butz,  born  January  26,  1889, 
issue:  Jean  Douglass,  born  March  6,  1915;  Jacob  Kenneth 
Staufifer,  born  April  9,  1891,  married  1917,  Sarah  Meyers, 
born  April  1,  1894,  issue:  Harriet  Elizabeth,  born  March 
11,  1919,  died  January  31,  1920,  Nancy  K.,  born  January 
4,  1921 ;  Wilfred  Ludwig  Staufifer,  born  October  29,  1893, 
served  in  the  Great  War  as  Sergeant,  1st  Class,  Aviation 
Corps,  'n  Aero  Squadron. 

JACOB  ANDREW  STRASSBURGER,  ESQUIRE,  son 
of  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  and  his  wife,  Elizabeth  Schwenk, 
was  born  in  Hilltown  Township,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania, 
October  15,  1849.  Receiving  his  primary  education  in  the  public 
schools,  he  later  attended  the  private  academy  at  Quakertown 
and  the  Treemount  Seminary,  the  latter  being  the  famous  old 
school  in  Norristown  of  which  Dr.  John  W.  Loch  was  later  head 
master.    He  had  an  ardent  desire  to  enter  Yale  College  and  while 


^ 


jUT'.  ;:• 


.  autcr,    K" 


■-.~t':\n-.'.)\..iKer, 


i-;-  ■'  :;  •  ::fif;-b:ir./';"  t\fin  l.^'ctuOfr  '•6,  1858;  mar- 
■:---^  ■  "'.  iy^'l.  :■-'■:  Sc'  --v'l- ^'^kvil!*?.  Pa.  \Vjif!:;d  Ltid' 
.  -     c-s:  r'';<>'>j-:-o\vri.  h'a  .  horn  jijjy  2u.  j.bo/,   v-f^'v 

■i  A,Yneri.:?i,n  R-e^voluuoT;,  sp-:!  ^^%;i.?  :,he  nsiig^avor.  ■;n 
Jie  v  a^;;  V  F.'irg<!!  ?,4ark'::r  io-  ''he  unkiiown  <IeGC. 
he  VVVf'u  \^'u^  ijhc  ser'vf..;!  en  the  Amcnca/s  Red 


1  ^.;iteei.    ;. 


■^;-e  \,   Vy\i   to  Novcaiber   11.,   1919. 


r'..av 


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v.v.on:5er    L     1919. 

f 

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livuiar^-  Sf'',  1889, 

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.^I'^.  St:/;:ii?  Meyers, 

i:^  Sc.i.'-'V'<T,  ls~  C'lrs:!,  Avfition 


(.ICOB    ,.:\:s ''Ki.VV   STR.A^^)U;.i^Gl•  R;    ESQuIRF.,   :i>on 

eabcif   y.   Strii.-^' 'U-;;^-   arid    liis    -vifc,    Elizabeth    Sciiwaiik, 

^  «::j-i.  In  Hiiltovvj,    i'-'^^ii^.^up,   iiucks   Cou/uy,  Pc^msylvaiua. 

'■  .'   '  ^    l;S-Vi.     Kv.'^"  ■.: 'D!::  ";i.H  prnnarv  edi:i(.c..tioB  in  the  public. 

.-•■  ]:ner   an^jr^.;'^   ;b'-   r^r-ivate  acH'ieray   ar  Qu:i.ker!:own 

'  "» iTnO'ant   S;~ni,'';  ?        ::-'.o   laiter   beisu;   die  la^'nour   >'5'.> 


araeni  ci 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  159 

at  Treemount  Seminary,  with  this  end  in  view,  he  diligently 
applied  himself  to  his  studies  and  made  a  remarkable  record  as  a 
student,  in  every  course  attaining  averages  of  99  per  cent  and 
standing  first  in  all  of  his  classes. 

His  mother  was  a  constant  aid  to  him,  encouraging  him  in 
his  wish  to  enter  Yale,  for  which  he  showed  his  appreciation 
by  a  love  and  devotion  which  endured  throughout  her  life.  But 
the  father  desired  his  son  to  enter  Ursinus,  the  Reformed  College, 
situated  at  Collegeville  within  a  short  distance  of  his  home  at 
Schwenkville.  This  decision  was  no  doubt  prompted  by  a  question 
of  expense,  which  was  seemingly  unnecessary,  for  his  father 
was  possessed  of  a  large  estate  for  those  days  and  he  could  easily 
have  gratified  this  particular  wish  of  his  son.  It  should  be  re- 
membered that  the  essentials  to  the  future  success  of  most  young 
men  raised  in  a  small  community,  is  to  be  found  in  the  broaden- 
ing influence  of  new  contacts  which  are,  for  the  most  part,  obtained 
at  the  larger  educational  institutions.  Association  with  young 
men  from  metropolitan  centers  is  often  of  inestimable  value. 
Had  this  young  man  been  given  this  great  opportunity  in  his 
youth  it  would,  in  all  probability,  have  created  in  him  a  confidence 
in  his  own  fundamental  worth  and  have  gone  far  towards  over- 
coming a  certain  shyness  of  manner  due,  no  doubt,  to  the  environ- 
ment and  limitations  found  in  the  small  country  village  in  which 
he  was  reared. 

Nevertheless,  his  life  proved  that  one  does  not  need  to  enter 
into  the  larger  fields  of  work  and  achieve  national  prominence 
in  order  to  fullfil  one's  obligation  and  duty.  By  his  exemplary 
life  and  the  various  activities  in  which  he  was  engaged,  he  became 
a  potent  factor  in  the  community  in  which  destiny  had  placed 
him.  After  all  it  is  the  ability  of  the  average  young  American 
to  adapt  himself  to  circumstances,  which  forms  the  backbone 
of  the  great  American  nation  today. 

Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  graduated  with  honors  from 
Ursinus  College  in  1873,  receiving  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts; 
and  in  1876,  the  degree  of  Master  of  Arts  was  conferred  upon 
him.  He  went  to  Philadelphia  and  studied  law  under  General 
B.  F.  Fisher,  who  had  had  a  notable  record  in  the  Civil  War 
and  occupied  a   high   position    at   the   Philadelphia    bar.      Two 


160  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

years  later,  Mr.  Strassburger  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  that 
city  and  continued  to  practice  there  until  1878,  when  he  removed 
to  Norristown,  in  order  to  be  in  closer  touch  with  his  clients. 
These  consisted  largely  of  the  upper  county  farmers  and  old  coun- 
try squires,  who  immediately  recognized  his  sterling  honesty 
and  general  worth.  These  men,  who  had  accumulated  their 
comfortable  farms  and  estates  through  hard  labor  and  toil,  were 
a  simple  but  able  people  who  demanded  a  standard  of  integrity 
— a  quality  for  which  he  was  noted  by  both  the  bench  and  his 
colleagues — and  they  invariably  turned  over  their  affairs  to  his 
honest  administration.  He  soon  built  up  a  large  general  practice 
and  was  solicitor  for  the  Directors  of  the  Poor  and  for  the  Clerks 
of  the  Court. 

He  started  early  to  build  up  his  own  extensive  law  library 
which,  at  his  death,  consisted  of  over  four  thousand  volumes, 
many  of  them  rare  editions,  while  his  large  private  library  at 
his  home,  with  its  worn  volumes,  mostly  on  philosophical,  politi- 
cal, and  historical  subjects,  attested  to  his  inherent  studious  quali- 
ties. As  a  member  of  the  Montgomery  County  Law  Library 
Committee,  he  assisted  in  the  work  of  revising  and  indexing 
the  books,  as  well  as  in  the  purchasing  of  new  volumes,  so  that 
now  the  library  is  considered  one  of  the  best  in  the  State. 

He  early  joined  the  ranks  of  the  Republican  party  and  soon 
became  a  factor  in  the  Pennsylvania  State  organization  and 
served  on  many  important  county  committees.  Throughout  his 
life,  his  loyalty  to  his  friends,  combined  with  his  assiduity  for 
hard,  patient  work,  made  him  a  valuable  asset  to  the  party.  He 
numbered  among  his  supporters  almost  the  entire  Pennsylvania 
rural  population  of  the  upper  end  of  the  county  and  with  the  pro- 
verbial horse  and  buggy  would  often,  at  the  request  of  a  candi- 
date, personally  canvass  the  townships,  Franconia,  the  Salfords, 
Perkiomen,  Skippack,  and  Towamencin  with  invariable  success. 

In  1892,  he  entered  the  National  Primary  contest  in  sup- 
port of  James  G.  Blaine,  Esquire,  in  the  latter's  unsuccessful 
campaign  against  Benjamin  F.  Harrison  for  President,  serving 
as  a  delegate  from  the  Seventh  Congressional  District  of  Penn- 
sylvania, at  the  National  Convention  in  Minneapolis.  In  1896, 
he  was  elected  District  Attorney  for  Montgomery  County  by  an 


Ti'    ^-V  ■  -LY  161 


overwhelming  majority,  i;ion  of  the  party, 

during   the    Roosevr]r  he    remained    a 

staunch  sup,;  •i'Si'Jl  continued  to 
take  an  ac- 


his  life   he  took  great   ixxterest,   tv3g^tk-r    with 

,  jiiid  colleague,  Joseph  Fornance,  in  the  Morugomery 

-.1  Society,  serving  as  its  treasurer  in  the  Cen~ 

on  of  the  County,   1884,  and  in  other  official 

records  of  the  Society  show  excellently  prepared 

treatises  of  his  re^*!^^tu^^mni*?Alt5nfc«k^<«>o?^^:al  and  farnUy  history. 

He  felt  a  justifiable  pride  in  his  own  people  who,  for  two  hun- 

.?   ui     ..  >:     -lad  contributed  so  largely  to  the  upbuilding  of  his 

:\te.    Through  intermarriage  of  the  various  branches 

iring  this  long  period,  he  numbered  among  his 

'"arralies  of  the  country  region 

i   '^;  j~;  vi?..:  which  has  been 

ifvelnping  the 

•irarger 


ivania. 

■■'i  his  an- 
:  -i       V  -.re  he  him- 

elf  ^vas  trustee  of 


Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  161 

overwhelming  majority.  In  the  subsequent  division  of  the  party, 
during  the  Roosevelt  Progressive  Movement,  he  remained  a 
staunch  supporter  of  the  regular  organization  and  continued  to 
take  an  active  part  in  the  politics  of  the  State. 

Mr.  Strassburger  was  one  of  the  organizers  and  a  charter 
member  of  the  Riverside  Cemetery  Company  and,  as  a  charter 
director  of  the  Norristown  Trust  Company,  he  took  a  leading 
part  in  local  financial  matters,  remaining  with  this  institution 
as  a  member  of  the  Directorate  until  his  death.  With  Freeland 
G.  Hobson,  its  President,  and  others,  he  organized  certain  other 
profitable  companies  which  proved  the  soundness  of  his  finan- 
cial abilities.  He  also  administered,  with  equal  success,  several 
large  estates,  notably  that  of  his  mother's  sister. 

All  through  his  life  he  took  great  interest,  together  with 
his  friend  and  colleague,  Joseph  Fornance,  in  the  Montgomery 
County  Historical  Society,  serving  as  its  treasurer  in  the  Cen- 
tennial Celebration  of  the  County,  1884,  and  in  other  official 
capacities.  The  records  of  the  Society  show  excellently  prepared 
treatises  of  his  research  work  in  both  local  and  family  history. 
He  felt  a  justifiable  pride  in  his  own  people  who,  for  two  hun- 
dred years,  had  contributed  so  largely  to  the  upbuilding  of  his 
own  native  State.  Through  intermarriage  of  the  various  branches 
of  his  family,  during  this  long  period,  he  numbered  among  his 
connections  most  of  the  prominent  families  of  the  country  region 
in  which  he  was  born.  Through  that  institution  which  has  been 
so  largely  responsible  in  laying  the  foundation  and  developing  the 
character  of  real  Americans,  the  country  church,  Mr.  Strassburger 
kept  in  close  touch  with  his  people,  always  maintaining  active 
membership  in  the  German  Reformed  Church,  following  his 
worthy  ancestors  in  its  precepts.  He  was  first  associated  with 
the  Indian  Creek  congregation,  so  long  served  by  his  grandfather, 
but  upon  the  erection  of  the  Heidelberg  Reformed  Church,  in 
Schwenkville,  he  transferred  his  membership  to  it. 

He  was  a  Past  Master  of  Warren  Lodge  No.  310,  Free  and 
Accepted  Masons,  at  the  old  village  of  Trappe,  Pennsylvania. 
There,  likewise,  is  the  ancient  church  where  a  number  of  his  an- 
cestors worshipped  under  the  great  Muhlenberg,  and  where  he  him- 
self was  later  married.     For  fifteen  years,  he  acted  as  trustee  of 


162  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

his  Alma  Mater,  giving  to  it  his  time  and  services  as  a  lecturer 
on  constitutional  law. 

On  December  15,  1880,  Mr.  Strassburger  was  married  by 
the  Rev.  J.  H.  A.  Bomberger,  of  Trappe,  Pennsylvania,  to  Mary 
Jane  Beaver,  the  only  daughter  of  Dr.  Ephraim  K.  Beaver  and 
his  wife,  Lucy  Ann  Solliday,  of  Pennsylvania  and  Ohio.  Mary 
Beaver  was  born  January  16,  1856,  in  Center  Point,  now  Wor- 
cester, Montgomery  County,  Pennsylvania,  where  her  father  was 
then  established  in  the  practice  of  medicine.  While  still  an  in- 
fant in  arms,  her  parents  went  to  Circleville,  Piscataway  County, 
Ohio,  this  move  to  the  west  being  influenced  largely  by  the  fact 
that  a  number  of  Mrs.  Beaver's  relatives  had  removed  to  that 
part  of  Ohio  from  Lehigh  County,  Pennsylvania,  their  native 
place.  Here  Dr.  Beaver  soon  built  up  a  large  practice,  becoming 
one  of  the  leading  physicians  of  that  vicinity.  Three  years  after 
their  removal,  September  27,  1859,  Mrs.  Beaver  died  leaving, 
besides  Mary  who  was  then  three  and  a  half  years  of  age,  two 
sons,  Eugene  and  J.  Perry.  Dr.  Beaver  returned  to  Pennsylvania 
with  his  three  motherless  children,  locating  this  time  at  Alburtus, 
Lehigh  County,  where  he  died  July  4,  1862.  Bereft  of  both  par- 
ents, the  little  girl,  not  yet  seven  years  of  age,  went  to  live  with 
her  grand  aunt,  Sarah  Ann  Kerr  Derr,  wife  of  Franklin  Derr, 
of  Norristown,  where  she  was  brought  up  undei  the  strictest  re- 
gime, her  aunt  and  uncle  being  adherents  of  the  old-school 
Presbyterian  faith.  She  began  her  studies  at  private  schools,  being 
for  a  time  under  a  Miss  Hayman,  unto  whose  excellent  care, 
years  later,  she  confided  her  own  three  children.  She  then  en- 
tered the  Freeland  Seminary  for  Young  Ladies  at  Collegeville, 
making  her  home  during  this  period  with  her  uncle  and  aunt, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Kerr  Beaver,  of  Trappe.  It  was  while  visit- 
ing a  friend,  who  lived  on  the  property  adjoining  the  Strassburger 
home,  in  Schwenkville,  that  she  met  her  future  husband,  who 
was  then  a  prosperous  young  lawyer  with  offices  in  Norristown. 
After  their  marriage,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Strassburger  lived  for  a  while 
in  Schwenkville,  at  the  Strassburger  homestead,  but  eventually 
moved  to  Norristown  where  they  made  their  permanent  home,  and 
where  their  three  children,  Elizabeth,  Ralph,  and  Perry,  were  born. 

Jacob  Andrew   Strassburger,   Esquire,   died   in   Norristown, 


Cu 


rx 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  163 

March  30,  1908,  in  his  59th  year,  and  was  buried  in  the  River- 
side Cemetery.  The  following  tribute  paid  by  his  associates  at 
the  bar  was  reprinted  in  the  Norristown  Daily  Register,  April  1, 
1908: 

Tribute  of  Bar  to  J.  A.  Strassburger 

Eulogies  in  Memory  of  Well-Known 
Lawyer  by  Local  Judges  and 

Attorneys 
Last  Words  of  the  Departed 

A  meeting  of  the  Montgomery  County  Bar  Association  was  held, 
yesterday  afternoon,  in  the  Law  Library,  with  almost  a  full  attendance 
of  the  local  attorneys,  to  take  action  on  the  death  of  the  late  Jacob  Strass- 
burger. 

The  funeral  of  the  dead  lawyer  will  take  place  Friday,  and  the  follow- 
ing were  appointed  by  Judge  H.  K.  Weand,  president  of  the  Bar  Associa- 
tion, to  act  as  pall-bearers : 

Judge  Aaron  S.  Swartz,  Judge  William  F.  Solly,  Judge  James  B, 
Holland,  Judge  Mahlon  Stout,  Walter  M.  Shaw,  Henry  Freedley,  Neville 
D.  Tyson,  Montgomery  Evans,  Henry  M.  Brownback,  Joseph  Fornance, 
Francis  Rawle  and  Henry  C.  Boyer. 

Upon  motion  of  Mr.  Dannehower,  these  were  also  appointed  a  com- 
mittee to  represent  the  Bar  at  the  funeral. 

Judges  Swartz  and  Solly  and  Messrs.  N.  H.  Larzelere,  Walter  M. 
Shaw  and  Joseph  Fornance  were  appointed  a  committee  on  resolutions. 
They  reported  the  appended  minute,  which  was  unanimously  adopted : 

The  Minute 

"Jacob  A.  Strassburger,  Esquire,  whose  sudden  demise  we  are  met 
to  take  action  upon,  was  born  October  15,  1849,  and  came  to  the  bar  in 
1875.  He  had  scarcely  lived  through  the  middle  period  of  his  life  when 
death  claimed  him.  Within  a  year  an  insidious  illness  steadily  wrecked 
his  constitution  up  to  the  fatal  hour.  Through  it  all  he  remained  cheerful 
and  hopeful — that  was  his  disposition. 

"As  a  man,  he  was  genial  and  companionable,  esteemed  and  loved  by 
those  who  intimately  knew  him.  Sensitive  to  an  acute  degree,  he  avoided 
giving  ofifense  to  others,  and  if  he  did  his  sober  second  thought  led  him  to 
make  quick  amends.  He  was  thoroughly  honest  and  sincere — a  man  of 
convictions,  possessing  strong  individuality,  which  gave  him  marked  char- 
acter. 


164  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

"As  a  lawyer,  in  the  practice  of  the  profession,  he  was  thorough, 
accurate  and  successful.  He  hated  sham,  pretence  or  wrong,  and  never  re- 
sorted to  doubtful  expedients  to  gain  a  cause  or  win  a  triumph.  As  a  sure 
and  conservative  advisor,  he  discouraged  rather  than  promoted  litigation. 
He  was  the  soul  of  honor — and  his  word  was  sufficient. 

"In  his  domestic  life  he  stood  for  the  sanctity  of  the  home,  was  un- 
selfishly devoted  to  his  family  and  the  advancement  of  his  children. 

"We  beg  to  convey  to  his  stricken  widow  and  children  an  expression 
of  our  own  loss  and  our  sincerest  sympathy  and  condolence  in  this  hour  of 
their  trial  and  sorrow. 

Following  is  a  report  of  the  eulogies : 

Judge  Weand 

"Gentlemen  of  the  Bar:  We  have  again  assembled  to  pay  tribute  to 
a  deceased  member  of  the  bar.  In  the  death  of  Mr.  Strassburger  the  bar, 
the  profession  and  the  community  have  suffered  a  distinct  loss.  As  a  citi- 
zen he  was  an  upright,  conscientious.  Christian  gentleman,  honored  and 
respected  by  all  who  knew  him.  He  had  certain  qualities  which  won  him 
friends  who  gave  him  their  confidence,  friendship  and  esteem.  He  had  a 
kind  heart,  a  mild  and  charitable  disposition,  and  an  encouraging  word  for 
those  who  sought  his  advice. 

"He  was  a  good  lawyer,  well  versed  in  elementary  principles,  and  his 
arguments  before  the  Court,  oral  or  written,  evinced  great  study  and 
research.  He  was  not  content  to  rely  upon  the  latest  decision,  but  searched 
for  the  reason  and  origin  of  the  principle  involved. 

"During  his  term  as  District  Attorney  occurred  the  trial  of  some  of 
the  most  important  criminal  cases  in  the  history  of  our  Court,  and  he  con- 
ducted them  with  marked  ability  and  always  with  due  regard  to  the  rights 
of  the  accused. 

"We  will  miss  him  greatly,  but  knowing  his  sufferings  may  we  not 
be  consoled  by  the  thought  that  he,  knowing  that  death  meant  relief  from 
earthly  care  and  suffering,  did  not  dread  the  inevitable  summons.  To  his 
bereaved  family  we  can  only  say : 

"Sweet  after  toil  is  sleep; 

Then  wherefore  sorrow  for  him  who  sleeps, 

And  will  not  wake  tomorrow." 

Judge  Swartz 

"This  large  gathering  of  the  members  of  the  bar  is  a  tribute  to  the 
memory  of  our  departed  brother.    It  testifies,  in  silence,  to  our  respect  and 


-"V^^^fe^-  ^/^(^^^^^^  ^>A.^--^iy  /4^  y^^7-^*^^^^^^Z^C-^^^^:^c-y- 


^A 


^y/t^r^ 


'^ 


?-) 


y/yy 


Transcript  from  L'amily  Record  made  by  R.  Y.  Strassbiirger, 

in  his  own  handwriting,  of  the  l)irth  of  Clara  Strassburger 

and   Jacob  Andrew   Strassbnroei". 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  165 

esteem  for  him,  in  clearer  and  stronger  form  than  any  words  that  I  may 
speak. 

"I  knew  Jacob  A.  Strassburger  from  the  time  of  his  college  days. 
For  more  than  thirty  years  we  followed  our  chosen  profession  in  closest 
intimacy  and  warmest  friendship.  He  was  your  friend  as  well  as  mine. 
His  helping  hand  was  never  denied  to  any  one.  In  your  trouble  it  was  his 
pleasure  to  come  to  your  relief.  No  labor  was  too  arduous  for  him  if  it 
aided  in  solving  your  difficulty. 

"Sometimes  quick  in  speech,  but  just  as  quick  to  correct  a  mistake, 
he  treasured  no  resentment  and  no  man  was  more  ready  to  take  back  the 
hasty  word  that  might  lead  to  a  misunderstanding*  *  *." 

But  no  tribute  given  or  to  be  given  him  could  possibly  equal 
that  from  his  loved  ones.  His  home  and  his  children  were  his 
life;  no  sacrifice  too  heavy,  nothing  too  great,  to  give  them.  He 
was  ambitious  for  his  children,  strict  only  in  their  general  train- 
ing and  special  matters  of  education;  his  great  ambition  was  not 
for  himself  but  for  them.  His  desire  was  to  insure  their  success 
and  he  left  no  stone  unturned  to  aid  them  in  this  endeavor.  His 
letters  to  his  eldest  son,  Ralph,  while  he  was  at  Exeter  and  later  at 
the  United  States  Naval  Academy,  were  models  of  Chesterfieldian 
style.  His  stern  admonishment  when  a  monthly  study  report  failed 
to  meet  his  approval — scanned  the  more  carefully  when  the  owner 
would  fall  in  general  average — could  scarcely  hide  the  love  which 
called  it  forth  nor  how  much  it  meant  to  him. 

After  all  what  can  give  a  son  more  satisfaction,  more  pleas- 
ure, more  content,  than  the  knowledge  of  the  great  love  and  affec- 
tion ever  borne  by  such  a  father  for  his  children  as  shown  by  his 
life  efforts  to  give  his  all  to  them !  It  is  therefore  felt  that  in  the 
dedication  of  this  volume  to  him,  an  appreciation,  however  small 
it  may  be,  can  be  thus  publicly  expressed.  Nothing  can  repay 
what  it  meant  to  have  such  a  parent.  There  is  no  effort  too  great 
to  endeavor  to  live  up  to  his  precepts. 

The  only  daughter,  Elizabeth,  had  early  shown  unmistakable 
musical  talent  and  having  reached  a  point  in  her  education  where 
it  was  believed  foreign  study  alone  could  round  out  her  truly  mag- 
nificent voice,  Mrs.  Strassburger,  with  her  daughter  and  younger 
son,  Perry,  on  October  3,  1900,  sailed  for  Paris,  France,  and  there. 


166  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

while  supervising  the  education  of  her  son  and  daughter,  for  two 
years  she  lived  in  the  most  enjoyable  surroundings  amidst 
the  musical  and  artistic  folk  of  the  American  Colony.  The  sud- 
den death  of  her  gifted  daughter  in  January,  1902,  brought  the 
Paris  visit  to  an  abrupt  close;  but  the  bereaved  mother  bore  up 
bravely  under  her  great  sorrow,  returning  at  once  to  this  country 
with  her  son,  Perry.  She  lived  in  comparative  quiet  for  several 
years,  interesting  herself  in  her  two  boys  and  their  education,  but 
she  ever  kept  in  mind  the  devoted  daughter  and  her  wonderful 
attainments. 

Upon  the  death  of  Mr.  Strassburger,  in  1908,  the  home  was 
broken  up  and  Mrs.  Strassburger  spent  much  of  her  life  there- 
after in  travel,  crossing  the  American  continent  a  number  of  times, 
as  well  as  making  repeated  trips  to  Europe.  In  January,  1911, 
she  had  sailed  on  a  second  Mediterranean  cruise,  but  one  of  her 
friends  being  taken  ill,  she  returned  to  America  in  April,  only  to 
recross  the  Atlantic  with  her  son,  Ralph,  to  be  present  at  his  mar- 
riage. May  11,  at  West  Wickham,  County  Kent,  England,  to 
May  Bourne,  daughter  of  Commodore  Frederick  Gilbert  Bourne, 
of  New  York.  She  returned  to  America  to  attend  the  wedding 
of  her  other  son,  Perry,  to  Mary  Alice  Birchall,  daughter  of  Warren 
Randolph  Birchall,  of  Germantown,  which  took  place  on  June  3rd, 
at  St.  Michael's  Church,  Germantown.  Shortly  after  this  she 
returned  to  live  in  Florence,  Italy,  and  also  spent  part  of  her  time 
with  her  son  in  Tours,  France.  Mrs.  Strassburger  took  great 
interest  in  historical  research  work,  and  contributed  frequent 
letters  to  the  Norristown  Herald  on  interesting  subjects 
relating  to  her  travels.  In  April,  1913,  in  making 
a  return  visit  to  America,  she  unfortunately  became  very  ill 
and  entered  the  Chestnut  Hill  Hospital  to  undergo  an  operation, 
from  the  effects  of  which  she  did  not  recover,  and  on  Monday 
morning  July  7,  1913,  died.  The  eldest  son,  Ralph,  was  at  the 
time  in  Europe,  but  being  notified  of  his  mother's  death,  he  start- 
ed at  once  on  the  long  and  sorrowful  journey  homeward.  The 
funeral  services  were  held  at  the  home  of  her  son.  Perry,  No.  547 
Pelham  Road,  Germantown,  on  July  10,  the  Rev.  Thomas  R. 
Beeber,  of  the  First  Presbyterian  Church  of  Norristown,  officiating. 
Her  body  was  laid  in  the  vault  at  Riverside  Cemetery,  Norristown, 


';.  FAMJ'LY  167 

niitn  ^he  arriva-  T't>  d&j'S  later,  in 

?!  iiGf:  of  her  mortal  re- 

i  ,1  and  daughter 

1  i).      :■  = 

■-:'    ''■-     Fir    - 

Furee 


■    gathered  in  her  travels;  but,  generous  to 
■  she  would  lavish  gifts  among  her  family 
.•t»jS"iM«d  t?.at5<.  vyTftsS.  X  ^oM. 

'■'  ■J.icng  the  elenent;?  making  up  the  character  of  Mary 
^  .burger  was  her  unselfish  devotion  to  her  children. 

She  ever  labored  for  the  advancement  of  her  family,  and  toiled 
side  by  side  vvith  her  husband,  carefully  saving  and  patiently 
rlamiing.    A  ?/on.ian   of  dominant   and   virile   personality,   she 
;«ed  a  natural  abilitv  to  make   and  hold   friends.      In  her 

•ler  temporary  abiding  places  she  drew 

'  ^-     '"tual  people.     She  was 

.it.     Slie  spoke  French 

!  her  writingi<,  though  infrequent. 

nd  a  vocabulary;  widened 

^v^  was  ]i--  •'  *'■  ■  ■  '■  ■   ' 


:^92,  by  the 

:.v3  a  member  of 

....  .a,  June  2,   1897. 

ie  town  and  in  Phiiadel- 


Mary  J.  Beaver  Strassburger, 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  167 

until  the  arrival  of  her  son  from  Europe.  Ten  days  later,  in 
the  presence  of  the  sorrowing  family  and  friends,  her  mortal  re- 
mains were  laid  beside  those  of  her  beloved  husband  and  daughter 
in  the  family  burial  plot  at  Riverside. 

Mrs.  Strassburger  was  a  lifelong  member  of  the  First  Pres- 
byterian Church  of  Norristown;  a  member  of  the  Valley  Forge 
Chapter,  Daughters  of  the  Revolution,  through  her  ancestor  John 
Sallade  (Solliday),  and  for  one  term  its  treasurer;  with  her  hus- 
band, a  charter  member  of  the  Ersine  Tennis  Club. 

She  was  a  collector  of  beautiful  oriental  rugs,  chosen  with  the 
assistance  of  experts,  which  graced  her  home  for  many  years. 
As  a  lover  of  old  mahogany,  she  purchased  many  beautiful  pieces 
throughout  the  country;  copies  of  famous  paintings,  old  laces, 
prints,  and  the  like  were  gathered  in  her  travels;  but,  generous  to 
the  heart,  upon  returning  she  would  lavish  gifts  among  her  family 
and  friends. 

Chief  among  the  elements  making  up  the  character  of  Mary 
Beaver  Strassburger  was  her  unselfish  devotion  to  her  children. 
She  ever  labored  for  the  advancement  of  her  family,  and  toiled 
side  by  side  with  her  husband,  carefully  saving  and  patiently 
planning.  A  woman  of  dominant  and  virile  personality,  she 
possessed  a  natural  ability  to  make  and  hold  friends.  In  her 
home,  in  her  travels,  and  in  her  temporary  abiding  places  she  drew 
about  her  circles  of  charming  and  intellectual  people.  She  was 
a  rare  hostess  and  in  conversation  brilliant.  She  spoke  French 
and  German  passably  well  and  her  writings,  though  infrequent, 
show  a  clear  style,  a  grasp  of  subject  and  a  vocabulary,  widened 
by  a  lifetime  of  careful  study.  Her  life  was  lived  for  others  and 
her  unselfishness  was  her  greatest  merit. 

Children  of  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  and  Mary  J.  Beaver, 

1.  Elizabeth  Beaver  Strassburger,  eldest  child  and  only  daughter  of 
Jacob  Andrew  and  Mary  J.  Beaver  Strassburger,  was  born 
in  Norristown,  Pa.,  October  23,  1881 ;  died  in  Paris,  France, 
January  11,  1902.  She  was  baptized  June  3,  1892,  by  the 
Reverend  Thomas  R.  Beeber  and  admitted  as  a  member  of 
the  First  Presbyterian  Church,  Norristown,  June  2,  1897. 
At  first  attending  school  in  her  home  town  and  in  Philadel- 


168  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

phia,  she  then  entered  The  Misses  Irwin's  school  from 
which  she  graduated  in  1899.  She  possessed  a  rare  mezzo- 
soprano  voice,  and  after  having  pursued  her  musical  studies 
in  this  country,  she  went  abroad,  accompanied  by  her  mother 
and  younger  brother,  to  continue  her  musical  education  under 
famous  instructors  in  the  French  capital.  She  had  a  won- 
derfully beautiful  voice  and  at  the  end  of  two  years  was 
accorded  the  unusual  honor  of  being  asked  by  the  Director 
General  of  the  Paris  Opera  to  appear  in  a  role  in  one 
of  his  operas.  She  accepted  the  invitation,  though  it  was 
never  her  intention  to  enter  upon  an  operatic  career.  But 
in  the  midst  of  making  preparations  for  this  event,  she  was 
suddenly  stricken  with  appendicitis  and  died  after  a  very 
short  illness.  A  heart-broken  mother  returned  to  her  home, 
bringing  with  her  all  that  was  mortal  of  her  beautiful, 
talented  daughter.  She  was  laid  to  rest  in  the  family  lot, 
in  Riverside  Cemetery,  Norristown,  Pa. 

2.  RALPH  BEAVER  STRASSBURGER,  born  March  26,  1883 ; 

married  May  11,  1911,  MAY  BOURNE. 

3.  Perry  Beaver  Strassburger,  younger  son  of  Jacob  Andrew  and 

Mary  J.  Beaver  Strassburger,  was  born  in  Norristown,  Pa., 
August  6,  1888,  and  baptized  May  5,  1889,  by  Rev.  Thomas 
R.  Beeber,  pastor  of  the  church  of  his  mother,  First  Pres- 
byterian of  Norristown.  He  was  married  at  St.  Michael's 
Church,  Germantown,  June  3,  1911,  by  the  Rev.  Arnold  H. 
Hord,  to  Mary  Alice  Birchall,  born  September  20,  1886, 
daughter  of  Warren  Randolph  Birchall  and  his  wife  Emma 
Susanna  Scatchard,  of  Germantown,  Pa.  Mr.  Strassburger 
obtained  his  early  education  at  the  Norristown  and  Plymouth 
Meeting  Friends'  School,  but  in  the  fall  of  1900  he  accom- 
panied his  mother  and  sister  to  Europe  and  during  their  two 
years'  residence  in  Paris,  he  attended  the  Ecole  Alsacienne, 
Paris.  In  the  summer  of  1901,  in  company  with  his  father, 
who  had  crossed  the  ocean  to  visit  his  family,  he  travelled 
through  the  Rhine  District  and  while  in  the  Palatinate,  visited 
Ober  Ingelheim,  the  ancestral  home  of  the  Strassburgers. 
Returning  to  this  country,  Mr.  Strassburger,  in  1903,  entered 
Phillips  Exeter  Academy,  at  Exeter,  N.  H.,  was  graduated 
from  there  in  1906,  and  the  following  year  entered  the  Uni- 
versity of   Pennsylvania,  where  he  remained  until  shortly 


Til!  •  LY  169 

'•   ,\car!einy,,  he  was 
'e  Exonian,''  luvl 

c,,.^;:    iti    the  monthly 

>a  the  Wall 


•  :iace»  anK>t!.g  the  vT^unger  banker •■■  u: 

lie  has  a  c'lmoiand  of  tht-  French  and 

■  and  is  also  a  finariciai  writer. 

J,e  iuh  be..^  LiLk^ 'ii'  ■'«*^  t^^e  Ambler  Trust  Company; 

ot  tlie  (JIa  Pup'as   Association  of  the  Plymouth 

■■>iends'  School;  member  of  the  Historical  Society 

J  Ivania,  the  Colonial  Society  of  I*ennsy!!vania,  the 

Pennsylvania  Society  of  the  Sons  of  the  Revolution,  the 

'■'-■■•"  "'•'■■''■'^"'  German  Society,  and  the  American  Academy 

ad  Social  Science.     He  resides  in  M^)ntc.Iair, 

jNcw  He   takes   an   active    interest   in    Episcopal 

'  V       7  \n;:'utrs,  ot*  wi'  '   '     'a.  member;  and  in  1921,  wab 

[  ?.  n-if^-r-her  o^  'rv  oi  St.  Luke's  Protestant 

:sitt:  Betty  Heap  Stra&s- 
■    -  4,  1912,  a* 


i 


1  m'W%- 
■nd  his 


witc,  M'  iisylvania, 

March  2-  ih  of  the  same 

-,^,r  by  ti,,  ^Ijg  church  of 

another,  istown,  he  has 


.-„_.»>ii»w^.rt^*.«.«vjpn.«»-4,«t)9«fcSi«Kfe\,y^^^ 


Mrs,  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburgef. 


yiV4rs»s''*-*'fe"*:J»'^?/-'  -   ■  ■<fMi*>^y'^!i!t'i^'^^i^t>^i^i<ii>:yi>«--^^^W'^''- 


■J '••  .*W43^  i;wi.>»«{5--^ .  i'S^'^.iV^*, -r-?     -.*'=!»* 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  169 

after  his  father's  death.  While  in  the  Academy,  he  was 
editor  of  the  school  semi-weekly  paper,  "The  Exonian,"  and 
at  the  University  was  managing  editor  of  the  monthly 
magazine,  "The  Punch  Bowl." 

After  leaving  college  he  took  a  position  on  the  Wall 
Street  Journal  and  later  was  connected  with  the  Philadelphia 
News  Bureau  prior  to  his  entering  the  banking  house  of 
E.  B.  Smith  &  Company,  of  Philadelphia.  He  later  was 
connected  with  the  National  City  Company,  New  York,  and 
Kissel,  Kinnicutt  &  Company,  Bankers,  14  Wall  Street,  New 
York  City.  He  left  this  latter  firm  to  accept  a  position  with 
the  American  Express  Company  as  the  General  Manager 
of  their  Securities  Department,  which  position  he  now  holds. 
He  has  had  a  most  active  and  successful  career,  and  occupies 
one  of  the  foremost  places  among  the  younger  bankers  in 
New  York  City.  He  has  a  command  of  the  French  and 
German  languages  and  is  also  a  financial  writer. 

He  has  been  director  of  the  Ambler  Trust  Company; 
President  of  the  Old  Pupils'  Association  of  the  Plymouth 
Meeting  Friends'  School;  member  of  the  Historical  Society 
of  Pennsylvania,  the  Colonial  Society  of  Pennsylvania,  the 
Pennsylvania  Society  of  the  Sons  of  the  Revolution,  the 
Pennsylvania  German  Society,  and  the  American  Academy 
of  Political  and  Social  Science.  He  resides  in  Montclair, 
New  Jersey.  He  takes  an  active  interest  in  Episcopal 
Church  matters,  of  which  he  is  a  member;  and  in  1921,  was 
elected  a  member  of  the  Vestry  of  St.  Luke's  Protestant 
Episcopal  Church  of  Montclair.  Issue :  Betty  Heap  Strass- 
burger,  born  June  15,  1912,  baptized  November  4,  1912,  at 
St.  Michael's  Church,  Germantown,  Pa.;  Susanne  Strass- 
burger,  born  March  3,  1914,  baptized  July  9,  1916,  at  St. 
Thomas'  Church,  Whitemarsh,  Pa.;  Beaver  Strassburger, 
born  November  10,  1915,  baptized  July  9,  1916,  at  St. 
Thomas'  Church,  Whitemarsh,  Pa. 

RALPH  BEAVER  STRASSBURGER,  publisher  and  news- 
paper owner,  eldest  son  of  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  and  his 
wife,  Mary  Jane  Beaver,  was  born  in  Norristown,  Pennsylvania, 
March  26,  1883,  and  although  baptized  September  9th  of  the  same 
year  by  the  Reverend  Thomas  R.  Beeber,  pastor  of  the  church  of 
his  mother,  the  First  Presbyterian  Church  of  Norristown,  he  has 


170  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

followed  the  creed  of  his  father,  the  old  German  Reformed  faith. 
His  father  was  a  member  of  the  Reformed  Church  of  Schwenkville 
and  his  great-grandfather  was  for  forty  years  a  minister  at  Indian 
Creek,  Tohickon,  and  other  Reformed  congregations  in  Mont- 
gomery and  Bucks  Counties. 

He  received  his  preliminary  education  in  the  public  and 
private  schools  of  Norristown,  graduating  from  the  High  School 
in  1899.  He  then  studied  at  Phillips  Exeter  Academy,  Exeter,  New 
Hampshire,  for  two  years,  during  which  time  he  secured  high  hon- 
ors in  athletics,  and  was  selected  as  a  member  of  the  famous  foot- 
ball team,  in  1900,  which  defeated  Andover  10-6.  Every  member 
of  this  Phillips  Exeter  team  subsequently  became  a  member  of 
a  leading  university  team.  In  1901,  Mr.  Strassburger  was  appoint- 
ed to  the  United  States  Naval  Academy  by  the  Honorable  I.  P. 
Wanger,  from  his  home  district,  now  the  Eighth  Congressional 
District  of  Pennsylvania.  During  his  Annapolis  days  he  kept 
up  his  prestige  in  athletics,  playing  for  four  years  on  the  football 
team  with  great  distinction.  In  1902,  he  was  chosen  substitute 
for  the  All-American  Team  of  that  year,  having  scored  all  the 
points  for  Annapolis  in  the  memorable  Army  and  Navy  game 
played  at  Philadelphia.  Upon  his  graduation  from  Annapolis, 
in  1905,  he  was  ordered  to  sea,  having  the  honor  of  being  chosen 
to  serve  under  Rear  Admiral  W.  B.  Brownson,  United  States  Navy, 
the  former  Superintendent  at  the  Naval  Academy.  His  vessel  was 
the  new  flagship  of  the  armored  cruiser  squadron,  the  U.  S.  S. 
West  Virginia.  After  two  years  at  sea,  he  received  promotion  to 
the  rank  of  Ensign.  He  next  saw  service  on  the  U.  S.  Battle- 
ship Connecticut,  under  command  of  Admiral  Robley  D.  Evans, 
and  was  attached  to  the  Presidential  yacht  Mayflower  of  the  United 
States  Navy,  in  1907,  during  the  incumbency  of  the  late  Theodore 
Roosevelt.  Ensign  Strassburger  also  served  on  the  fast  scout  cruiser 
Birmingham  during  the  conduct  of  the  competitive  engineering 
tests  between  the  United  States  Cruiser  Salem  and  the  U.  S.  S- 
Chester. 

In  1909,  after  eight  years'  service,  he  left  the  Navy  to  accept 
a  position  in  the  marine  department  of  the  Babcock  &  Wilcox  Com- 
pany, manufacturers  of  most  of  the  steam  boilers  installed  for  the 
American,  English,  and  Italian  navies,  as  well  as  for  the  navies 


or; 


> 


-r     On 


W 


J5     oj 


O 


U 


c/o 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  171 

of  Brazil,  Argentina,  and  several  smaller  nations.  Incidental  to 
this  phase  of  his  career,  a  story  is  related  which  forcibly  illustrates 
Mr.  Strassburger's  cool  and  courageous  conduct  in  a  dangerous 
emergency.  During  the  progress  of  the  builders'  trial  trip  of  the 
newly  completed  U.  S.  Battleship  North  Dakota,  a  header  blew  out 
causing  the  death  of  two  men  and  scalding  several  others.  He 
promptly  entered  the  chamber  and,  regardless  of  personal  danger, 
was  enabled  to  isolate  the  boiler,  thereby  saving  many  lives  and, 
in  all  probability,  the  ship  itself. 

On  May  11,  1911,  Mr.  Strassburger  was  married  by  the  Rev- 
erend H.  Bertie  Roberts,  at  the  Church  of  St.  John  the  Divine, 
West  Wickham,  County  Kent,  England,  to  May  Bourne,  daugh- 
ter of  Commodore  Frederick  G.  Bourne  and  his  wife,  Emma  Sparks 
Keeler,  of  New  York.  Commodore  Bourne  was  born  December 
20,  1851,  and  died  March  9,  1919.  He  was  President  of  the  Singer 
Manufacturing  Company  and  resided  on  his  beautiful  estate  at 
Oakdale,  Long  Island. 

At  the  outbreak  of  the  Balkan  War,  in  1913,  Mr.  Strassburger 
entered  the  diplomatic  service  and,  after  passing  the  required  ex- 
amination, was  appointed  by  President  Taft  as  Consul  General 
and  Secretary  of  Legation  to  Roumania,  Bulgaria,  and  Servia. 
Following  this  he  was  promoted  to  the  post  of  Second  Secretary 
of  the  Embassy  at  Tokio,  Japan.  Upon  the  accession  of  the  Dem- 
ocratic Party  to  political  supremacy  with  the  election  of  Woodrow 
Wilson  as  President,  he  retired  from  the  foreign  service  after  the 
appointment  of  William  J.  Bryan  as  Secretary  of  State. 

Always  active  and  influential  in  Republican  politics,  Mr. 
Strassburger  has  been  prominent  as  an  ardent  party  supporter  and 
follower  of  the  regular  Republican  State  organization.  In  1914, 
he  was  a  candidate  for  the  United  States  House  of  Representatives 
in  the  Republican  primaries,  but  was  defeated  by  Honorable  Henry 
W.  Watson  by  a  slight  majority. 

In  1914,  immediately  after  the  outbreak  of  the  European 
War,  he  foresaw  that  the  ultimate  position  that  America  would  oc- 
cupy would  be  either  that  she  would  be  forced  into  the  great  conflict 
or  else  be  compelled  to  take  extreme  protective  measures.  Being 
a  strong  believer  that  the  best  defensive  method  for  America 
to  assume  would  be  the  building  up  and  the  strengthening  of  the 


172  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Navy  rather  than  the  forming  of  a  large  Army,  he  joined  the 
Navy  League.  Shortly  he  was  elected  to  the  Board  of  Directors 
and  became  a  member  of  the  Executive  Committee  of  that  Board. 
The  Navy  League  was  more  or  less  a  social  organization  at  the 
time  of  his  entrance  into  it,  but  in  a  short  space  of  time  he  collected 
a  large  amount  of  money  from  his  friends  in  New  York,  and  at  a 
famous  luncheon  given  at  the  down  town  club,  $20,000  was  sub- 
scribed for  an  educational  campaign.  This  was  really  the  start- 
ing of  the  Preparedness  movement.  At  that  time  the  Preparedness 
idea  had  not  been  much  thought  of,  and  none  of  the  numerous 
societies  which  sprang  up  later,  such  as  the  National  Security 
League  and  the  American  Defense  Society,  were  even  in  existence 
and  the  fundamental  work  which  was  carried  on  was  against  the 
violent  opposition  of  the  Carnegie  Peace  Society,  and  it  was  neces- 
sary to  literally  force  the  news  items  into  the  papers  throughout  the 
country.  The  work  which  had  been  done  by  the  Carnegie  Peace 
Society  had  borne  fruit  and  a  popular  song  at  that  time  was  "I 
did  not  Raise  My  Boy  to  be  a  Soldier." 

These  efforts  of  Mr.  Strassburger,  who  was  much  younger 
than  his  colleagues,  were  in  opposition  to  the  views  of  certain  older 
members  of  the  Board;  but  in  the  dispute  which  subsequently 
arose,  Mr.  Strassburger  won  out  after  a  bitter  contest.  He  was 
also  instrumental  in  the  suggesting  and  calling  of  a  committee  to 
formulate  plans  for  the  association  of  Reserve  Officers  of  the  Navy, 
which  afterwards  grew  into  the  great  organization  which  furnished 
the  reserve  officers  during  America's  participation  in  the  war.  As 
early  as  February,  1917,  at  the  time  of  the  rupture  of  diplomatic 
relations  between  this  country  and  Germany,  he  immediately 
offered  his  services  to  the  Navy  Department  at  Washington,  and 
was  assigned  to  the  U.  S.  Naval  Intelligence  Division.  He  also 
saw  service  on  the  Overseas  Transport  Louisville,  and  later  was 
assigned  to  special  duty  in  connection  with  the  Fourth  Naval  Dis- 
trict. He  received  a  letter  of  commendation  from  the  Secretary 
of  the  Navy  for  his  services  during  the  war. 

In  December,  1919,  again  foreseeing  the  serious  results  which 
would  ensue  from  American  participation  in  the  League  of  Nations, 
he  entered  actively  into  the  discussion  as  to  whether  or  not  the 
United  States  should  follow  the  Wilsonian  policy  and  enter  the 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  173 

League  of  Nations  and  ratify  the  Treaty  of  Versailles.  He  was 
a  strong  supporter  of  the  Knox  plan  and  that  group  of  patriots 
who  were  characterized  as  "Irreconcilables"  by  the  Wilsonian 
Democrats;  was  a  large  financial  contributor  to  the  first  meetings 
which  were  held  throughout  the  country  against  the  League,  and 
participated  actively  in  the  management  of  this  campaign.  An 
ardent  supporter  of  Senator  Knox,  of  Pennsylvania,  Mr.  Strass- 
burger  would  have  supported  him  for  the  Presidency;  but  upon 
Senator  Knox's  announcement  that  he  would  not  be  a  candidate, 
he  followed  Knox's  suggestion  and  took  an  active  part  in  the  man- 
agement and  underwrote  the  campaign  of  Senator  Hiram  W. 
Johnson,  of  California,  in  the  fight  on  the  League.  The  success 
of  this  campaign,  because  of  the  issue  involved  and  the  campaign- 
ing ability  of  Mr.  Johnson  himself,  was  remarkable.  In  contra- 
diction to  the  methods  in  use  by  the  Wood  and  Lowden  forces  its 
conduct  was  notably  efficient  and  economical  as  shown  by  the 
fact  that  while  the  Wood  forces  were  spending  over  $2,000,000 
the  Johnson  campaign  was  managed  for  about  $200,000.  It  was, 
shown  by  the  Senate  Investigating  Committee  that  Mr.  Strass- 
burger  was  the  main  contributor  to  the  Johnson  campaign  and 
one  of  the  most  active  in  its  management.  In  November,  1920,  he 
accompanied  Senator  Medill  McCormick,  of  Illinois,  on  a  trip 
to  Geneva,  at  which  time  they  attended  the  first  meeting  of  the 
League  of  Nations.  Subsequently  they  visited  Vienna,  Budapest, 
Prague,  Warsaw,  Berlin,  Rome,  Brussels,  Paris,  and  London, 
meeting  on  this  trip  practically  every  statesman  of  note  and  gaining 
much  information  as  to  the  condition  and  ideals  of  these  various 
nations.  As  a  result  they  returned  fully  satisfied  that  the  stand 
which  they  had  taken  regarding  the  League  was  the  correct  one. 

Mr.  Strassburger's  estate,  Normandy  Farm,  at  Franklinville, 
Gwynedd  Valley,  Pennsylvania,  is  one  of  the  most  extensive  in 
the  state,  comprising  nearly  one  thousand  acres,  and  over  thirty 
houses  and  barns,  one  of  the  latter  being  five  hundred  feet  in  length. 
The  farm  is  devoted  chiefly  to  the  raising  of  thoroughbreds  and 
hunting  horses.  Among  some  of  the  horses  are  "Panacea"  (Peter 
Pan-Mint  Cake)  from  James  R.  Keene's  stud  in  Kentucky;  "Gin- 
gersnap  Second,"  a  granddaughter  of  "Meddler"  and  brought 
from  the  Haras  de  Fresnay,  France,  owned  by  Clarence  H.  Mac- 


174  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

kay;  and  "Wolverton  II,"  winner  of  the  Radnor  Hunt  Cup,  Rose 
Tree  Hunt  Cup,  Fox  Hall  Cup,  Monkton  (Maryland),  defeating 
thirty  of  the  best  point-to-point  horses  in  America. 

Mr.  Strassburger  is  the  owner  and  publisher  of  the  Norris- 
towTi  Herald,  one  of  the  oldest  dailies  in  the  State  of  Pennsylva- 
nia, having  been  founded  in  1799.  There  have  been  but  four  or 
five  owners  of  this  paper  during  its  123  years  of  existence.  It  is 
one  of  the  best  known  dailies  in  the  country  and  is  renowned  for 
its  conservative  editorials  and  its  support  of  the  principles  of  the 
Republican  Party. 

He  is  a  Councilor  of  the  Colonial  Society  of  Pennsylvania, 
and  a  member  of  the  following  clubs  and  organizations: 

The  Historical  Society  of  Pennsylvania 

Colonial  Society  of  Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania  Society  of  Sons  of  the  Revolution 

The  Genealogical  Society  of  Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania  Horticultural  Society 

Society  of  Foreign  Wars 

Society  of  Mechanical  Engineers 

Royal  Institute  of  Naval  Architects,  London,  England 

American  Automobile  Association 

Eastern  Pennsylvania  Jersey  Cattle  Club 

Thoroughbred  Horse  Association 

National  Geographic  Society 

New  York. 

University  Club 

American  Lawn  Tennis  Association 

New  York  Yacht  Club 

Racquet  and  Tennis  Club 

Recess  Club 

Army  and  Navy  Club 

New  York  Press  Club 

Jekyl  Island  Club 

National  Republican  Club 

Turf  and  Field  Club. 


TI 


Philadelphia. 


Army  and  Navy  C'lib 

Racquet  Club 

National  CovvLf: ■'i.wj^^  .\3r;K;r-ti^n 

Graduates  Assoc  ii^^ii^ioi4«.^»§^<i  t(W\^rf«K'*thtt«^o\. 

United  States  Maval  Officers'  Association 

Naval  tif^istorical  Society 

Navy  Athletic  Association 

War  Cruiser  and  Transport  Association 

Tr;.^elers  Club,  25  Avenue  Champs  Elyseef^,  Paris,  France 
;  Chib  de  Pans,  Paris,  France 

ub,   London,    /...<,:... v. ^i,   ar-H    "^'.^-ren, 

:  V,  Paris,  France. 


,  born  Janu- 


Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


THE  STRASSBURGER  FAMILY  175 

Philadelphia. 

Bryn  Mawr  Polo  Club 

Racquet  Club 

Philadelphia  Cricket  Club 

Markham  Club 

Radnor  Hunt  Club 

White  Marsh  Valley  Hunt  Club 

Rose  Tree  Hunt  Club 

Huntingdon  Valley  Hunt  Club 

Penllyn  Club 

Sunnybrook  Golf  Club 

Florist  Club. 

Washington. 

Metropolitan  Club 

American  Remount  Association 

Army  and  Navy  Club 

Racquet  Club 

National  Conservation  Association 

Graduates  Association,  U,  S.  Naval  Academy; 

United  States  Naval  Officers'  Association 

Naval  Historical  Society 

Navy  Athletic  Association 

War  Cruiser  and  Transport  Association 

Travelers  Club,  25  Avenue  Champs  Elysees,  Paris,  France 

Tennis  Club  de  Paris,  Paris,  France 

Alpine   Public   Schools    Club,    London,    England,   and    Murren, 

Switzerland 
He  de  Puteaux,  Paris,  France. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Strassburger  have  one  child,  a  son,  Johann 
Andreas  Peter  Strassburger,  named  for  his  great-great-great-great- 
grandfather, Johann  Andreas  Strassburger,  the  pioneer  ancestor 
who  came  to  this  country  from  Ober  Ingelheim,  Germany,  in  1742. 

Children  of  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  and  May  Bourne: 

1.  (Son)  born  October  16,  1913;  died  at  birth. 

2.  JOHANN  ANDREAS  PETER  STRASSBURGER,  born  Janu- 

ary 3,  1916. 


176  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

JOHANN  ANDREAS  PETER  STRASSBURGER,  only 
child  of  Ralph  Beaver  and  May  Bourne  Strassburger,  was  born 
January  3,  1916,  and  is  therefore  but  six  years  of  age  as  this  book 
goes  to  press.  He  is  a  typical  American  boy,  showing  even  thus 
early  every  indication  that  in  time  he  will  grow  into  a  worthy 
representative  of  the  long  line  of  worthy  ancestors,  whose  lives  and 
deeds  it  has  been  the  aim  of  this  book  to  record  and  preserve. 

DESCENT  FROM  JOHANN  ULRICH  STRASSBURGER: 

l^III.  Johann  Ulrich  Strassburger  married  Maria  Elizabetha  (Fliicken), 

VII.  Johann  Andreas  Strassburger  married  Catherina  Rosina  Kolb. 

VI.  John  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Eve  Yeager. 

V.  John  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Catherine  Stout. 

IV.  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  married  Elizabeth  Ziegler  Schwenk. 

III.  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Mary  Jane  Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


•4  M  "f  ■  If     "^  y 

M 1 1.  \ 


;>       ■■"-I       ;, 


ijn  aiisc 


c  wooded 
?  signifies 
Mf  while  Mger  is  the  GerBian  fox  hunter 


'Mie  Teutoruc  \'«or«"'  ode  s'mnKics 


tv?>lder  setSed  first  in  Gemiantown,  where 

V  Christopher  Saur  in  his  newspaper, 

i a  ■ .  ,  1 74  S  -S  The  following  year  he  removed 

wili:  -or  ■■'  ■■  T€#Tjship  lu  what  is  now  North- 
ampton C'(>  .  "'ATfeere  we  find  several  of  his  chil- 
dren were  baptizerl  :uistor  cj  the  Gerraan  Reformed  Church 
of  Willi aiBs  and  vSauuji.i  '  His  first  wife  was  Anna 

"'•^■'''*     ■'-'''■'  "^'^^  ^^aptixed  ,.:.,.     .,^     :-^^'^'"    ■5'"'"''"  '^ '^.  second  wife 
.  'vah,  an-'  t^-^'-pr^te'  'kd,  third,  a 

Widow,  whose  C'hrislian  r  4  ('aihv- 

John  Philip  ''   "  Vn  , 


(« 


fnifjo  ij'. 


oorn 

■J.' 


on  Town- 


•I" 


fe3 


m^^^fM^  ^%-  ■■•.vi'.^V 


The  YEAGER  FAMILY 


JOHANNES  JAGER  (Yeager),  born  October  9,  1721,  in 
Germany,  came  to  America  on  the  ship  Loyal  Judith, 
James  Cowie,  Master,  sailing  from  Rotterdam  and  arriving 
in  Philadelphia  September  2,  1743/  On  the  same  ship  was 
Johann  Philip  Oden welder  (Odewelder),  and  it  is  probable  they 
both  came  from  the  same  part  of  Germany,  as  a  warm  friendship 
existed  between  these  two  men  and  their  families  for  many  years. 

Just  east  of  Manheim  and  Worms  and  south  of  Frankfort,  in 
Germany,  lies  the  Odenwald,  or  forest  of  Oden,  an  immense  wooded 
tract  that  covers  a  wide  area.  The  Teutonic  word  ode  signifies 
desolate,  and  wald  forest,  while  Yager  is  the  German  for  hunter 
or  gamekeeper. 

John  Philip  Odenwelder  settled  first  in  Germantown,  where 
we  find  him  mentioned  by  Christopher  Saur  in  his  newspaper, 
under  date  of  December  16,  1745.  The  following  year  he  removed 
with  his  family  to  Williams  Township  in  what  is  now  North- 
ampton County,  Pennsylvania,  where  we  find  several  of  his  chil- 
dren were  baptized  by  the  pastor  of  the  German  Reformed  Church 
of  Williams  and  Saucon  Townships.  His  first  wife  was  Anna 
Maria;  she  was  baptized  and  confirmed,  1752;  his  second  wife 
was  named  Susannah,  and  after  her  death  he  married,  third,  a 
widow,  whose  Christian  name  was  Catherine. 

John  Philip  Odenwelder  settled  permanently  in  Easton,  Pa., 
where  he  died  in  1795.  His  will,  dated  in  May  of  that  year,  was 
proved  in  July  following. 

Philip  Odenwelder,  son  of  John  Philip  and  Anna  Maria 
Odenwelder,  was  born  February  2,  1748,  and  baptized  by  the 
pastor  of  Williams  Reformed  Church  on  April  17  of  the  same 
year,  and  died  in  Easton  in  1828,  aged  seventy-nine  years.  He 
married  Anna  Maria,  eldest  daughter  of  John  Yeager,  born 
January  17,  1749,  and  died  in  Easton,  Pa.,  August  20,  1828.' 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Volume  XVII,  pp.  237-238. 

2  Records  of   the   German   Reformed   Church   of   Williams   and   Saucon   Town- 
ships, Northampton  County,  Pennsylvania. 


178  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Philip  Odenwelder  took  up  a  tract  of  land  in  what  was  then 
known  as  The  Forks.  Odenweldertown,  adjoining  the  western 
part  of  Easton,  was  named  for  John  Odenwelder,  a  grandson  of 
the  emigrant. 

John  Yeager,  when  he  came  to  Pennsylvania,  settled  in  New 
Hanover  TowTiship,  now  Montgomery  County.  On  April  12, 
1748,^  John  Yeager  was  married  by  the  Rev.  Henry  Melchior 
Muhlenberg,  pastor  of  the  Trappe  Lutheran  Church,  to  Eve  Eliza- 
beth Schneider,  who  was  the  daughter  of  John  Adam  Schneider 
and  wife,  Elizabeth,  of  New  Hanover,  Pa.  Eve  Elizabeth  (Anna 
Elizabeth,  or  Maria  Elizabeth,  as  her  name  sometimes  appears) 
was  born  in  Hoehnburg,  Germany,  February  28,  1728,  and  died 
in  Easton  December  4,  1804.  The  Rev.  Thomas  Pomp,  pastor  of 
the  Easton  Lutheran  Church,  officiated  at  her  burial  and  entered 
upon  his  private  record"  that  "she  was  born  February  28,  1728, 
in  Hoehnburg,  Germany,  the  daughter  of  John  Adam  Schneider 
and  wife,  Elizabeth,  the  sponsors  at  her  baptism  being  John  Martin 
and  Anna  Maria  Schneider.  She  was  confirmed  by  Rev.  Henry 
Melchior  Muhlenberg  at  Falconer  Schwam."  It  further  states  that 
"she  lived  in  marriage  forty-eight  years  and  had  nine  children, 
four  sons  and  five  daughters,  all  living  at  the  time  of  her  death; 
forty  grandchildren  and  twelve  great-grandchildren."  Rev.  Pomp's 
account  says:  "Her  illness  began  last  Sunday  a  week  ago  with 
alternate  heat  and  cold,  which  increased  notwithstanding  all  efforts 
to  restore  her  health.  She  died  Wednesday  at  12  o'clock,  aged 
76  years,  8  months  and  6  days,  and  was  buried  December  6,  1804, 
at  Easton." 

Upon  the  record  of  Falkner  Swamp  Lutheran  Church  we  find 
among  those  confirmed  on  "Sunday  after  Easter,  1746,  Anna 
Elisabeth  Schneider,  Johann  Adam  Meyer's  step-daughter.'"'  From 
this  we  infer  that  her  father,  John  Adam  Schneider,  died  and  her 
mother  married,  second,  John  Adam  Meyer,  a  neighbor  and  fellow 
church  member. 


1  Records  Trappe  Lutheran  Church,  Montgomery  County,   Pennsylvania. 

2  Private    Record,   Rev.   Thomas   Pomp,   in   possession   of    Charles   R.    Roberts. 
Allentovi^n,  Pennsylvania. 

3  Rev.  J.  J.  Kline,  A  History  of  the  Lutheran  Church,  in  Nezsj  Hanover,  Penn- 
sylvania, p.  508. 


THE  YEAGER  FAMILY  179 

John  Yeager  and  his  wife,  Eve  Elizabeth,  were  members  of 
the  New  Hanover  Lutheran  Church,  and  the  following  children 
were  baptized  by  the  pastor  of  this  charge:^ 

Job.  Christophel  Jager,  b.  Jan.  19,  1751 ;  bap.  May  26,  1751.     Par. 

John  and  Maria  EHsabeth.     Sponsors,  Christian  Huber  and  wife. 
Anna  Catherina  Jager,  b.  Dec.  11,  1751;  bap.  Jan.  5,  1752.     Par. 

Johannes  and  Elisabeth.     Sponsors  Joh.  Jorg  Zimmernan  and 

wife. 
Eva  Jager,  b.  Nov.  24,  1754;  bap.  Dec.  25,  1754.     Par.  Johannes  and 

EHsabeth.     Sponsors,  Valentin  Stichter  and  Eva  Singer,  both 

single. 

An  advertisement  appeared  in  Saur's  Germantown  Paper, 
date  unknown,  in  which  Thomas  Forster  states  that  "he  made  his 
home  with  John  Yeager  in  Falkner  Swamp,  one  mile  from  Johannes 
Schneider."^ 

About  1757  John  Yeager  seems  to  have  removed  to  some  part 
of  Bucks  County,  for  we  find  that  his  next  child,  a  son,  John,  born 
October  31,  1757,  was  baptized  by  the  pastor  of  the  Tohickon 
Reformed  Church  in  Bedminster  Township,  Bucks  County.^ 

Johannes,  son  of  Johannes  Jager  und  Elizabeth,  baptized  31  August 
1757,  born  16  August  1757.  Wits.  John  Moor  and  wife  Eve 
Elizabeth. 

Just  after  the  last-named  date  he  and  his  family  removed  to 
what  was  known  as  the  Forks  of  Delaware,  then  in  Bucks,  but 
later  a  part  of  Northampton  County. 

The  Forks  of  the  Delaware  was  understood  to  include  the 
entire  present  area  of  Northampton  County,  except  the  townships 
of  Williams  and  Lower  Saucon;  that  is,  all  territory  between  the 
Rivers  Delaware  and  Lehigh  and  thence  to  the  Blue  Mountains.* 

Easton  was  laid  out  in  1750.  Thomas  Penn  gave  the  land 
and  as  he  had  married  Julianna  Fermer,  daughter  of  Lord  Pom- 


1  Rev.  J.  J.  Kline,  A  History  of  the  Lutheran  Church,  in  New  Hanover,  Penn- 
sylvania, p.  376. 

2  Henry  S.  Dotterer's  Manuscripts,  Volume  XV,  p.  301. 

3  Records  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania. 
*M.  S.  Henry,  History  of  Lehigh  Valley,  Pennsylvania,  1860,  p.  34. 


180  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

fret,  he  requested  that  the  new  town  be  called  Easton  after  Lord 
Pomfret's  house,  and  when,  two  years  later,  a  new  county  was 
erected  out  of  Bucks,  it  was  given  the  name  of  Northampton.  The 
Proprietaries'  Manor  of  Fermer  was  included  in  the  newly  erected 
county.  Part  of  this  Manor  consisting  of  11,000  acres,  known  as 
the  Barrens,  or  Dry  Lands,  lay  within  the  Forks  of  the  Delaware, 
but  being  Proprietary  land,  was  not  open  for  settlement. 

Some  of  the  settlers  about  the  Falkner  Swamp  and  the  Perki- 
omen  region,  among  others  Paul  Moser,  Philip  Odenwelder  and 
John  Yeager,  decided  to  push  their  way  up  the  valley  towards  the 
Blue  Mountain  in  search  of  larger  and  more  desirable  farms. 
That  section  was  then  almost  a  wilderness,  and  the  following  de- 
scription of  the  country  and  the  hardships  experienced  by  these 
venturesome  pioneers  is  given  in  a  petition  under  date  of  May  15, 
1765,  which  sets  forth  that  for  "twelve  years  (1752-1765)  they 
had  experienced  great  hardships  and  inconvenience  in  traveling 
back  and  forth  to  Easton,  which  was  environed  on  all  sides  with 
hills  and  rivers,  secluding  it  from  the  rest  of  the  country"  *  *  * 
that  owing  to  the  great  distance  and  bad  roads  it  was  "unsafe  in 
winter  for  traveling  on  horseback  and  almost  impassable  for 
wagons  and  vehickles  many  people  find  such  inconveniency  in 
recovering  their  rights  they  rather  choose  to  submit  to  lose  them 
than  attempt  to  recover  under  so  great  discouragement."  And 
further  "the  road  to  Easton  is  so  inconvenient  passing  through  a 
large  tract  called  the  Dry  Lands  so  thinly  inhabited  that  in  the  dis- 
tance of  twelve  miles  from  Bethlehem  to  Easton  there  is  but  one 
or  two  huts,  and  not  one  drop  of  water  neither  in  summer  nor  fall 
season  to  refresh  either  man  or  horse  so  that  in  winter  travellers 
are  in  danger  of  perishing  with  cold  or  being  parched  up  in  the 
summer  with  heat."^ 

These  people  did  not  long  enjoy  their  new  homes,  for  in  an 
Indian  outbreak,  1756-58,  the  savages  descended  upon  the  settlers 
near  the  Blue  Mountain,  killing  a  number,  burning  the  houses  and 
grain  and  forcing  the  inhabitants  to  seek  other  homes  elsewhere. 
A  number  of  them  settled  on  the  Dry  Lands,  as  witnessed  by  the 
following:^ 


1  M.  S.  Henry,  History  of  Lehigh  Valley,  Pennsylvania,  1860,  p.  78. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,  First  Series,  Volume  III,  p.  578. 


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THE  YEAGER  FAMILY  '  181 

Petition  of  Settlers  on  the  "Dry  Lands"  Near  Easton,  to  R.  Peters, 

AND  His  Answer,  1759. 

Philad^  March  1st,  1759. 

Sir, 

We  are  poor  people  who  have  been  obliged  by  the  Indians  to  desert 
our  plantations  near  the  Blue  Mountains,  and  are  now  settled  on  the  dry 
Lands  about  six  Miles  from  Easton,  one  of  us  hath  bought  an  improve- 
ment for  the  sum  of  Thirty  pounds. 

We  pray  that  you  will  be  pleased  to  permit  us  to  live  on  the  Lands 
we  now  possess,  we  are  desirous  and  willing  to  pay  any  price  for  the 
Land  you  shall  think  reasonable,  and  if  the  Lands  are  not  to  be  sold  we 
are  willing  to  pay  rent  for  them.  And  if  they  are  not  to  be  disposed  pray 
let  us  remain  in  possession  until  the  proprietaries  pleasure  shall  be  known 
concerning  the  premises. 

We  are  Sir, 

Your  humble  servants, 

his 
Walter    X    Miller 
mark 
his 
John    X   Clase 
mark 

I  absolutely  .forbid  all  persons  to  purchase  Improvements  on  the  dry 
Lands,  or  any  person  to  settle  on  said  Lands  in  the  Forks  of  Delaware. 

Richard  Peters. 

1st  March,  1759. 
Directed, 

To  Richard  Peters,  Esq^  Secretary,  &ca^ 

The  Proprietaries'  agent  made  repeated  attempts  to  drive  these 
people  off  this  land,  but  as  they  were  willing  to  pay  rent,  or  buy 
the  farms  outright,  the  majority  of  them  resisted  all  efforts  to 
dispossess  them,  and  the  controversy  was  waged  in  the  county 
courts  for  a  long  term  of  years,  not  being  settled  until  near  the 
close  of  the  century. 

After  the  cessation  of  the  Indian  outrages  in  1756-59  the 
Indian  war,  known  as  Pontiac's  War,  broke  out  (1763),  and  these 
frontier  inhabitants  began  to  fear  the  dreaded  foe  might  appear  at 
any  time  and  burn  the  town  of  Easton.  Steps  were  taken  to  defend 
the  town.     A  company  of  militia  was  formed  and  Jacob  Arndt 


182  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

chosen  the  captain.  They  bound  themselves  together  for  the  pur- 
pose of  protection  against  the  savages  under  the  following  agree- 
ment :  ^ 

Wee,  the  undernamed  subscribers,  do  hereby  joyntly  and  severally 
agree  that  Jacob  Arndt  Esquire  shall  be  our  Captain  for  three  months 
from  the  date  of  these  presence,  and  Be  allwise  Ready  to  obeay  him  when 
he  sees  ocation  to  call  us  together  in  persueing  the  Indians,  or  helping 
any  of  us  that  shall  happen  to  be  in  distress  by  the  Indians.  Each  per- 
son to  find  arms  and  powder  and  lead  at  our  own  cost  and  have  noe  pay. 
Each  person  to  find  himself  in  all  the  necessarys;  to  which  articl,  cove- 
nant and  agreement.  Wee  Bind  ourselves  in  the  penal  sum  of  Five  pounds 
Lawful  monies  of  Pensilvania,  to  be  Laid  out  for  arms  and  amunition 
for  the  use  of  the  Company,  unless  the  person  soe  Neglecting  to  obeay, 
shall  show  a  lawfull  Reason. 

"Given  under  our  hands  this  13th  day  of  October  1763." 
Signed  by 

Jacob  Arndt 
Peter  Seip 
Michael  Lawall 
Adam  Hay 
Paul  J.  Ebbel 

and  thirty  others. 

The  following  is  a  muster  roll  of  the  company : 

Jacob  Arndt  William  Bonstein 

John  Sandy  Elias  Bender 

Philip  Odenwelder  Richard  Richards 

John  Jaeger  Garrett  Moore 

Jacob  Reichardt  Henry  Raddler 

Jerry  Leidy  Philip  Mann 

Michael  Butz  James  Bunston 

Christian  Smith  Christian  Gress 

Paul  J.  Ebbel  Jacob  Hartzell 

Adam  Hay  M.  Lawall 

John  Miller  Matthias  Pfiefer 

P.  J.  Mann  M.  Owen  Arndt 

Elias  Shook  Matthew  Rownisr 


West  &  Condit,  History  of  Easton,  Pennsylvania,  pp.  196-197. 


THE  YEAGER  FAMILY  183 

Michael  Sheund  Peter  Seip 

Melchoir  Young  Christopher  Hahn 

Jacob  Grouse  Christopher  Sienteog 

Valentine  Sandy  John  Painter 

Robert  Townsend 

It  is  not  known  just  where  John  Yeager  and  his  family  settled 
upon  their  arrival  in  Northampton  County,  as  the  term  "The 
Forks"  applied  to  such  a  large  area. 

About  1758,  we  find  in  "A  List  and  return  of  the  number  of 
Waggons  draught  horses  and  pack  horses  in  the  Foarks  township, 
Northampton  County  (1744  to  1765)"  that  "John  Yeger  had  one 
draught  and  one  pack  horse. "^ 

In  1772,  he  was  taxed  £5.6.8  as  a  farmer;'  1780,  the  assessed 
valuation  of  his  land  was  £1,008;  and  in  1785-1788,  he  paid  taxes 
to  the  amount  of  £1.10.0  on  200  acres  of  land,  four  horses  and 

four  cows.^ 

The  earliest  land  purchase  of  which  we  have  record  is  dated 
April  6,  1785,  wherein  it  is  recited  that  John  Yeager,  of  Forks 
Township,  Northampton  County,  purchased  of  Eve  Moser,  widow, 
a  tract  of  seventy  acres  of  land  lying  in  Forks  Township,  part  of  a 
larger  tract  which  Philip  Odenwelder,  the  elder,  in  1768,  sold  to 
Paul  Moser,  deceased,  and  all  a  part  of  the  large  tract  called  the 
Dry  Lands. 

Deed:  Eve  Moser  to  John  Yeager,  1785 

TO  ALL  PEOPLE  TO  WHOM  THESE  PRESENTS  SHALL 
COME,  Eve  Moser,  Widow  and  Administratrix  of  all  and  singular  the 
goods  and  chattels  Rights  and  credits  which  late  were  of  Paul  Moser  of 
Forks  Township  in  the  County  of  Northampton  and  State  of  Pennsylvania 
Yeoman  dec'd  Sends  Greeting  Know  ye  that  the  said  Eve  Moser  for  and 
in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  One  hundred  and  forty  pounds  lawful 
money  of  Pennsylvania  to  her  in  hand  paid  by  John  Yeager  of  the  said 
Township  Yeoman  ***  and  the  said  John  Yeager  thereof  and  there- 
from fully  acquitted  and  discharged  she  the  said  Eve  Moser  by  Virtue  of 
certain  powers  given  in  and  by  the  last  Will  and  Testament  of  the  said 
deceased    ***    Doth  grant  bargain  sell  release  and  confirm  unto  the  said 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Fifth  Series,  Volume  I,  p.  219. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XIX,  p.  65. 

3  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XIX,  pp.  144,  200,  370. 


184  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

John  Yeager  ALL  that  Messuage  or  Tenement  and  tract  of  land  situate 
in  the  Township  of  Forks  aforesaid  bounded  by  lands  of  William  Roup, 
Frederick  Wilhelm,  Frederick  Keehn,  and  road  leading  from  Currie's 
Ferry  to  Easton,  and  thence  by  the  other  part  of  the  large  tract  whereof 
this  is  a  part  ***  Containing  Seventy  acres,  it  being  part  and  parcel  of  a 
certain  tract  of  172  acres  or  thereabouts  which  Philip  Odenwelder,  the 
Elder,  sometime  in  the  year  1768  did  bargain  and  sell  unto  the  said  Paul 
Moser  dec'd,  and  part  of  a  certain  large  tract  of  land  commonly  called  the 
dry  lands  **  to  hold  to  him  the  said  John  Yeager  his  heirs  and  assigns 
forever.  In  Witness  Whereof  the  said  Eve  Moser  hath  hereunto  set  her 
hand  and  seal  the  twenty  sixth  day  of  April  1785/ 

her 
Eve   X   Moser 
mark 

The  Paul  Moser  mentioned  in  this  deed  had  been  one  of 
those  who  had  gone  up  from  Falkner  Swamp  to  settle  on  the  Blue 
Mountain  lands,  and  after  being  driven  off  by  the  Indians  had 
taken  possession  of  the  prohibited  Dry  Lands.  The  Paul  Moser 
estate  joined  that  of  John  Yeager,  and  therefore  both  families 
were  parties  to  the  controversy  which  so  long  waged  between  the 
agents  of  Penn  and  these  settlers. 

John  Yeager  died  on  April  6,  1796,  and  was  buried  in  the 
graveyard  of  the  old  St.  John's  Lutheran  Church  at  Easton.  He 
made  a  will  dated  April  2,  1796,  which  was  proved  May  23, 
following,  in  which  liberal  provision  was  made  for  his  wife  out 
of  his  personal  estate,  and  to  his  sons,  Henry  and  Philip,  he  left 
his  plantation,  which,  at  that  time,  consisted  of  two  hundred  acres. 
He  names  in  all  nine  children,  each  of  whom  is  to  receive  an  equal 
share  of  the  entire  valuation  of  the  estate." 

Will  of  John  Yeager,  1796 

In  the  name  of  God,  Amen.  I,  John  Yeager,  of  Forks  township,  in 
the  county  of  Northampton  and  Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania,  yeoman, 
being  of  sound  mind,  memory  and  understanding  (Blessed  be  God)  do 
this  second  day  of  April,  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  1796,  make  and  publish 
this  my  last  will  and  testament,  in  manner  following. 


iDeed  Book  H-1,  p.  507.     Easton,   Pennsylvania. 
2  Will  Book  No.  3,  p.  45.     Easton,  Pennsylvania. 


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one  //ioui,-r?i€/ ntne  /uf  //fZ/'rf/ x-j..  sfa^^-z^-^y 


Appointment  received  l)y  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  to  U.  S. 
Naval  Academy,  Annapolis,  Md.,   May  21,   1901. 


THE  YEAGER  FAMILY  185 

First,  I  do  order  and  direct  that  my  just  debts  and  funeral  expenses 
be  honourably  paid  and  discharged.  And  I  do  give  and  bequeath  unto  my 
beloved  wife  Elisabeth  the  sole  use  and  possession  in  the  House,  and 
yearly  six  bushels  of  wheat  from  each  of  my  two  sons  Henry  and  Philip, 
eight  bushels  of  rye  from  each,  six  bushels  of  buckwheat,  four  bushels  of 
Indian  corn,  100  pounds  of  pork,  one  cow,  a  good  bed,  with  the  bedstead 
which  she  possesses,  a  copper  kettle,  two  iron  pots,  one  frying-pan  and  the 
tripod,  with  six  pewter  plates,  one  dish  and  six  pewter  spoons  and  all  the 
earthen  ware  she  wants  for  her  use.  And  yearly  one  quarter  of  an  acre 
flaxseed  to  sow  in  the  garden.  She  may  have  liberty  to  sow  and  plant 
as  much  as  she  pleases.  Likewise  she  shall  have  every  year  during  her 
life  and  remaining  my  widow  Twenty  pounds  specie  to  be  raised  and  paid 
out  o.f  my  estate,  likewise  a  prayer-book  and  a  song  book. 

Item,  I  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  eldest  son  John  five  pounds  specie 
before  most,  and  I  do  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  two  sons  Henry  and 
Philip,  all  that  Improvement  and  Tract  of  land  whereon  I  now  live  sit- 
uate in  Forks  township,  Northampton  county  aforesaid,  bounded  by  the 
lands  of  George  William  Roup,  Widow  Moser,  Lawrence  Swartz  and 
others,  containing  two  hundred  acres,  more  or  less,  the  same  to  be  first 
valued  and  appraised  by  four  indifferent  persons,  to  be  mentioned  by  my 
executor  for  that  purpose,  and  the  amount  of  said  valuation  to  be  equally 
divided  among  my  four  sons,  John,  Henry,  Philip,  and  Christian  and  my 
five  daughters,  Mary,  Catharine,  Eve,  Elisabeth,  and  Margaret,  to  be 
equally  divided  amongst  them  or  their  respective  heirs  share  and  share 
alike. 

Likewise  I  do  order  and  direct  that  all  my  personal  estate,  cattle,  and 
other  household  goods,  and  my  implements,  shall  be  equally  divided  and 
shared  amongst  my  said  nine  children  after  my  decease. 

Item,  I  do  order  that  my  son  Henry  will  give  £100  more  as  my  son 
Philip  by  the  valuation  of  the  said  place  and  I  do  order  that  my  son  Chris- 
tian shall  have  the  mare  with  the  saddle,  bridle  and  utensils.  My  said 
sons  Henry  and  Philip  taking  their  shares  with  the  rest,  the  money  to  be 
paid  to  my  said  children  in  eight  yearly  payments,  each  child  to  receive 
their  part  yearly,  that  is  to  say,  the  nine  parts  to  be  divided  yearly  amongst 
my  children  share  and  share  alike,  and  in  case  my  son  Christian  should 
die  in  his  minority  and  without  issue,  then  I  do  order  that  the  share  of  my 
said  son  be  divided  amongst  my  surviving  children  share  and  share  alike. 
And  I  do  hereby  nominate,  constitute  and  appoint  my  two  sons,  Henry  and 
Philip  to  be  my  Executors  of  this  my  Last  Will  and  Testament  and  re- 
voking hereby  all  other  and  former  Wills  and  Testaments  by  me  made  and 
ratifying  and  confirming  this  only  to  be  my  Last  Will  and  Testament.     In 


186  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Witness  whereof  I  have  hereunto  set  my  Hand  and  Seal  the  day  and  year 

within  written. 

Witnesses :  ^• 

Johannes  Odenwelder 

Isaac  Koon 
Probated  May  23,  1796. 

The  controversy  between  the  late  Proprietaries  and  those  living 
on  these  Dry  Lands  had  been  carried  into  the  Supreme  Court  of 
the  State.  Finally  it  was  settled  in  June,  1796,  when  it  was  agreed 
that  all  court  actions  would  be  discontinued  and  that  the  late 
Proprietaries  or  their  heirs  would,  within  the  year,  convey  to  the 
settlers  or  to  their  heirs  all  right  and  possession  to  the  disputed 
lands,  the  occupiers  to  pay  at  the  rate  of  £65  10s  per  one  hundred 
acres.  As  some  of  the  settlers  had  earlier  come  to  an  agreement 
with  the  original  owniers,  this  above  mentioned  document  specified 
that  the  "agreement  was  not  extended  to  such  settlers  as  had  already 
compromised  or  come  to  an  agreement  to  purchase  absolutely  or 
had  received  deeds  or  articles  of  agreement."^ 

The  Yeagers  had  been  among  those  who  held  out  to  the  end, 
so,  in  compliance  with  this  promise,  the  following  deed  was  issued 
to  Henry  Yeager,  heir  of  John  Yeager,  granting  him  full  right  to 
his  deceased  father's  land : 


Deed:  John  Penn  et  al  to  Henry  Yager,  1796 

d)i0  SnDcntUtC  made  the  seventeenth  day  of  December  in  the 
year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety  six. 
BETWEEN  the  Honorable  John  Penn  of  Stokepoges  in  the  County  of 
Bucks  in  the  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain,  Esquire,  one  of  the  late  pro- 
prietors of  Pennsylvania,  and  of  the  three  lower  Counties  of  New  Castle, 
Kent  and  now  the  Delaware  State,  and  the  Honorable  Richard  Penn  of 
Queen  Ann  Street  west  in  the  Parish  of  St.  Mary  Lecone  in  the  County 
of  Middlesex,  in  the  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  aforesaid.  Esquire, 
Brother  of  the  late  John  Penn,  who  was  the  other  of  the  late  Proprietors 
of  Pennsylvania  and  of  the  three  lower  Counties  now  state  of  Delaware 
aforesaid,  by  Edmund  Physick  of  the  City  of  Philadelphia,  Esquire,  their 
attorney  constituted  by  letter  of  attorney  under  the  hands  and  seals  of 


1  Deed  Book  B,  p.  451,  Easton,   Pennsylvania. 


THE  YEAGER  FAMILY  187 

the  said  John  Penn  and  Richard  Penn,  duly  executed  bearing  date  the 
fourteenth  day  of  March  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety  six, 
(Recorded  in  the  Rolls  Office  for  Pennsylvania,  at  Philadelphia,  in  Letter 
of  Attorney  Book  No.  5,  page  332,  etc.)  of  the  one  part  and  Henry  Yager 
of  Forks  Tov^nship  in  the  County  of  Northampton  in  Pennsylvania,  yeo- 
man of  the  other  part.  WHEREAS  in  and  by  certain  articles  of  agree- 
ment dated  at  Easton  the  twenty  fifth  day  of  June  one  thousand  seven 
hundred  and  ninety  five  entered  into  and  made  by  or  on  behalf  of  the 
late  proprietors  of  Pennsylvania  or  their  legal  representatives  and  the 
settlers,  on  two  tracts  of  land  marked  A  and  B  in  the  draught  of  lands 
annexed  to  the  same,  agreement  commonly  called  the  Dry  Lands.  It  was 
agreed  for  adjusting  all  disputes  which  had  long  subsisted  respecting  the 
said  lands  that  all  the  actions  in  ejectment  then  depending  between  the 
lessee  of  the  late  proprietaries  or  their  legal  representatives  should  con- 
vey to  the  said  lessees  respectively  and  their  respective  heirs,  according 
to  their  respective  rights  and  possessions  the  lands,  which  they  respec- 
tively held  and  that  the  said  lessees  respectively  should  pay  for  the  same 
at  the  rate  of  sixty  five  pounds,  ten  shillings  per  hundred  acres  with  in- 
terest from  the  first  day  of  July,  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety 
five  as  in  and  by  said  recited  agreement  recorded  in  the  office  for  record- 
ing of  deeds  in  and  for  the  County  of  Northampton,  relation  being 
thereunto  had,  may  more  fully  and  at  large  appear.  And  WHEREAS 
the  said  lessees  have  procured  the  aforesaid  two  tracts  of  land  to  be 
measured  and  divided  into  separate  and  distinct  forms  of  lots,  agreeably 
to  the  irrespective  possessions  by  George  Palmer,  Esquire,  Deputy  sur- 
veyor of  the  County  of  Northampton  aforesaid,  and  the  said  Henry 
Yager,  has  represented  that  he  is  the  possessor  of  the  lot,  marked  and 
distinguished  in  the  General  Plan  o.f  the  said  resurvey  made  by  the  said 
George  Palmer  as  aforesaid,  a  conveyance  to  be  made  to  him  for  the 
same,  agreeably  to  the  above  recited  agreement,  therefore  this  indenture 
witnesseth  that  the  same,  the  said  John  Penn  and  Richard  Penn  by  their 
attorney  the  said  Edmund  Physick,  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum 
of  one  hundred  and  forty  five  pounds  nine  shillings  current  money  of 
Pennsylvania,  unto  the  said  Edmund  Physick  for  the  use  of  the  said 
constituents  at  or  before  the  sealing  and  delivery  to  the  said  Henry  Yager 
well  and  truly  paid,  the  receipt  whereof  is  hereby  acknowledged  HAVE 
granted,  bargained  and  sold,  released  and  confirmed  and  by  these  presents 
do  grant,  bargain  and  sell,  release  and  confirm  unto  the  said  Henry 
Yager  and  to  his  heirs  and  assigns. 


188  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

ALL  THx\T  the  aforesaid  lot  marked  and  distinguished  in  the 
General  Plan  of  resurvey  of  the  above  mentioned  two  tracts  of  land 
made  by  the  said  George  Palmer  as  aforesaid.  No.  83  situate  in  Forks 
Township,  in  the  County  of  Northampton  aforesaid.  Beginning  at  a 
post  thence  by  the  road  leading  from  Easton  to  Bethlehem,  and  by  land  in 
possession  of  Conrad  Edelman  south  sixty  degrees,  west  twenty  perches 
to  a  post  south  eighty  two  degrees  west  sixty  four  perches  to  a  post, 
south  eighty  seven  degrees  west  twenty  eight  perches,  south  sixty  eight 
degrees  and  a  half  west  thirty  one  perches,  south  fifty  seven  degrees  and 
a  half  west  forty  six  perches,  thence  partly  by  the  said  Conrad  Edel- 
man's  and  partly  by  land  in  possession  of  Frederick  R.  Wagner  by  the 
aforesaid  road  south  forty  seven  degrees,  west  one  hundred  and  ten 
perches,  and  a  half  thence  by  the  said  Wagner's  land  and  the  said  road 
south  forty  six  degrees  west  fourteen  perches  to  a  post,  thence  partly 
by  the  land  of  the  said  Wagner  and  land  in  possession  o.f  Adam  Konig 
south  three  degrees  and  a  half,  east  eighty  four  perches  and  three  quar- 
ters to  a  post,  thence  by  land  in  possession  of  the  heirs  of  Paul  Moser 
deceased,  north  sixty  eight  degrees  east  two  hundred  and  ninety  nine 
perches  to  a  stone,  thence  by  land  of  George  William  Raup  north  seven 
degrees  and  a  quarter  west,  one  hundred  and  thirteen  perches  to  the  place 
of  beginning.  Containing  two  hundred  and  twenty  two  acres  and  ten 
perches  and  allowance  of  six  acres  per  cent  for  roads  etc., 

TOGETHER  with  all  and  singular  the  rights,  remedies  and  appur- 
tenances whatsoever  thereunto  belonging  or  in  anywise  appertaining  and 
the  reversions  and  remainders,  thereof  and  all  the  estate,  right,  title,  in- 
terest, property,  claim  and  demand  whatsoever  of  them,  the  said  John 
Penn  and  Richard  Penn,  respectively,  in  law,  equity  or  otherwise  how- 
soever of  in  and  to  the  same. 

TO  HAVE  AND  TO  HOLD  the  said  described  tract  or  piece  of 
land,  hereditaments  and  premises  hereby  granted  with  the  appurtenances 
unto  the  said  Henry  Yager,  his  heirs  and  assigns,  to  and  for  the  only 
proper  use  and  behoof  of  the  said  Henry  Yager  his  heirs  and  assigns  for- 
ever. And  the  said  John  Penn  and  Richard  Penn  for  themselves,  their 
heirs,  executors  and  administrators  respectively  do  by  their  said  attorney 
covenant  promise  and  agree,  to  and  with  the  said  Henry  Yager  his  heirs 
and  assigns,  against  them  the  said  John  Penn  and  Richard  Penn,  and 
their  heirs  respectively  and  against  all  and  every  other  person  and  per- 
sons whatsoever  lawfully  claiming  or  to  claim,  by,  from  or  under  them 
or  any  or  either  of  them  by  deed  or  contract  shall  and  will  warrant  and 
forever  defend  by  these  presents. 


i?n'>  iiiiiipfrtrf  rljf  prr-^n-tficO  roiirvr  of  Ttni^ij  nt  tlic'^tiiiicii  t-lnir-i 
"iUm\ f  .Hf  ncVffl ti .  II IH^  l}(i'>  pii •xm'O  I  lie  rrq  n  1 1  rO  cvn  m  i  n 

itn  iHi'oiT  tijr  .nnuViuir  IfJonrf.prftMiriUiirii  i"  tlV  ruMi  ticnr>>  i-oiifM- 
illlnal 

tbirtifth       (^oij  »(    ;lauuiirn       in  rfirijciir(i|  our  ^CO^rv?) 
om-l!'xm'jnm1  Hinf  !)um>iT(^nn(^      i'm  nnOnfiljr 

^iniVprntViirr  <•[  tlk'^Initfii  T<inrr>;>  tlV  avx  hmixti  mi  tuEntn-niuth. 


^  J..,  Ote.  ft  a't" , 
"  ■ '      A^        T?„j,>v..,  •«.  ST  oM".. 


Diploma   received   by   Ralph   Beaver   Strassl)urf^er  upon   com- 
pleting" the  four-year  course  at  the  United  States  Naval 
Academy,  Annapolis,  Md..  January  30,   1905. 


THE  YEAGER  FAMILY 


189 


IN  WITNESS  WHEREOF  the  said  parties  have  interchangeably 
set  their  hands  and  seals  hereunto.  Dated  the  day  and  year  first  above 
written.^ 


Sealed  and  delivered  in  the 

presence  of 

Fred    Beates 
Ludwisf  Wilhelm 


John  Penn  (seal) 

Richard  Penn       (seal) 
By  their  attorney 
Edmund  Physick   (seal) 


On  June  23,  1798,  Henry  Yeager  and  wife,  Susanna,  conveyed 
to  Philip  Yeager,  brother  of  Henry,  a  tract  of  about  seventy-two 
acres,  part  of  the  father's  estate,  in  compliance  with  the  father's 
will. 

Deed:  Henry  Yager  and  Wife  to  Philip  Yager,  1798 

^l^i!si  SnDentUtC  Made  the  twenty  third  day  of  June  in  the  year 
of  Our  Lord  One  thousand  seven  hundred  and  Ninety  Eight  Between 
Henry  Yager  of  Forks  township  in  the  County  of  Northampton  and  state 
of  Pennsylvania  yeoman  and  Susanna  his  Wife  of  the  one  part,  and  Philip 
Yager    of     Forks     township    aforesaid    yeoman    of    the    other    part. 
WHEREAS  John  Yager  the  father  of  the  said  Henry  and  Philip  in  his 
lifetime  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  was  in  the  possession  of  a  certain 
Tract  or  piece  of  land  situate  in  Forks  township  aforesaid  Containing  two 
hundred  and  twenty  two  acres  and  ten  perches  besides  the  customary 
allowance  of  six  per  Cent  for  Roads  &c  (being  part  of  the  reserved  lands 
of  the  Late  Proprietaries  of  Pennsylvania  commonly  called  the  Dry  lands) 
and  being  so  in  and  holding  the  Possession  thereof  died,  first  made  his 
last  Will  and  Testament  in  Writing  bearing  date  the  Second  day  of  April 
in  the  year  of  our  Lord  One  thousand  seven  hundred  and  Ninety  six 
therein  giving  and  Devising  his  Possessory  Right  of  the  said  land  in 
certain  proportions,  and  under  certain  conditions  to  his  two  Sons  the 
said  Henry  and  Philip  as  in  and  by  the  said  Last  Will  Remaining  of 
Record  in  the  Registers  Office  at  Easton  for  said  County  of  Northampton, 
more  fully  at  large  may  appear,  And  WHEREAS  in  pursuance  of  the 
said  Devise  the  said  Proprietaries  of  Pennsylvania  by  their  Attorney 
Edmund  Physick  Esquire  by  Indenture  bearing  date  the  Seventeenth  day 
of  December  in  the  year  One  thousand  Seven  hundred  and  Ninety  six  and 
entered  in  the  office  for  recording  of  deeds  at  Easton  in  and  for  the 
County  of  Northampton  aforesaid  in  Deed  Book  D.  Vol  2,  p  21  &'=°  for  the 
Consideration  therein  mentioned  did  grant  bargain  sell  release  and  con- 


1  Deed  Book  D,  Volume  2,  p.  21.     Easton,  Pennsylvania. 


190  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

firm  unto  the  said  Henry  Yager  his  heirs  and  assigns  All  that  tract  of 
land  of  which  the  said  John  Yager  died  in  the  possession  of  And  Whereas 
since  the  said  Henry  hath  obtained  the  title  to  the  said  Land  he  hath 
made  Partition  and  Division  of  the  said  Land  between  himself  and  his 
Brother  the  said  Philip  Yager  agreeable  to  the  tenor  of  the  said  fathers 
Will  and  is  therefore  willing  and  desirous  to  Convey  &  Assure  the  por- 
tion thereof  herein  after  described  to  him  the  said  Philip  Yager  his  heirs 
and  assigns. 

THEREFORE  THIS  INDENTURE  WITNESSETH  that  the  said 
Henry  Yager  and  Susanna  his  wife  as  Well  in  Consideration  of  Comply- 
ing with  the  intention  of  his  father  the  said  John  Yager  as  of  the  sum 
of  five  shillings  lawfull  money  of  Pennsylvania  to  him  in  hand  paid  by 
the  said  Philip  Yager  at  the  Sealing  and  Delivery  of  these  presents  the 
receipt  whereof  is  hereby  acknowledged    **    Do  grant  Bargain  sell  alien 
enfeoff  Release  and  confirm  unto  the  said  Philip  Yager  and  to  his  heirs 
and  assigns  ALL  that  certain  Tract  of  land  situate  in  Forks  township 
aforesaid  Beginning  at  a  stone  in  a  line  of  George  William  Roups  land, 
thence  extending  by  land  in  the  tenure  of  Widow  Moser  South  Sixty 
eight  degrees  West  two  hundred  and  ninety  nine  perches  to  a  stone, 
thence  by  land  of  Adam  Konig  North  three  degrees  and  a  half  West 
twenty  One  perches  and  a  half  to  a  stone  thence  by  land  of  the  said  Henry 
Yager  North  fifty  four  degrees  East  one  hundred  and  two  perches  and  a 
half  to  a  stone,  North  thirty  two  Degrees  West  ten  perches  to  a  white 
oak   North   thirty   nine   degrees   and   a  half   West    Sixteen   perches   to 
another  white  oak  and  North  Forty  two  degrees  West  thirty  five  perches 
to  a  stone  placed  in  or  near  the  Public  Road  leading  from  Easton  to  Beth  • 
lehem  thence  along  the  same  Road  by   land  of  Edelman  North   forty 
Seven  Degrees  East  fifty  nine  perches  to  a  stone  and  North  fifty  seven 
degrees  and  a  half  east  twenty  eight  perches  to  a  stone  thence  by  other 
land  of  said  Henry  Yager  South  twenty  six  degrees  East  one  hundred 
and  thirty  one  perches  to  a  stone  and  north  sixty  eight  degrees  East  one 
hundred  and  twenty  four  perches  to  a  stone  in  the  line  of  said  George 
William  Roups  land  thence  by  the  same  South  seven  Degrees  and  a 
Quarter  East  one  perch  to  the  Place  of  Beginning  Containing  Seventy 
One  Acres  &  twenty  Six  perches  and  allowance  of  six  acres  per  cent  for 
Roads  &^°    Together  with  all  and  singular  the  Buildings  Improvements 
Ways  Woods  Waters  Water  Courses  Rights  Liberties  Privileges  Heredi- 
taments and  appurtenances  Whatsoever  thereunto  belonging     ***     To 
HAVE  AND  TO  HOLD  the  above  described  tract  or  piece  of  land 
hereditaments  and  premises  hereby  granted     ***     unto  the  said  Philip 
Yager  his  heirs  and  assigns  forever    ***    IN  WITNESS  Whereof  the 


THE  YEAGER  FAMILY  191 

said  parties  to  these  Presents  have  hereunto  Interchangeably  set  their 
hands  &  seals  dated  the  day  and  year  first  above  written/ 

Henry  Yager 
her 
Susanna     X     Yager 
mark 

The  signature  to  the  acknowledgment  June  23,  1798,  is  Hen- 
rich  Yager. 

Philip  Yeager  died  January  5,  1845,  and  his  part  of  the 
paternal  inheritance  descended  to  his  son.  Christian,  as  shown  by 
the  following  abstract  taken  from  an  interesting  document  on 
record  at  Easton: 


Valuation  and  Acceptance  Real  Estate  of 
Philip  Yeager,  Deceased,  1845^ 

Wbttt^S  Philip  Yeager  late  of  Township  of  Forks  County  North- 
ampton, farmer  by  last  Will  and  Testament  December  26,  1844  did  direct 
"that  a  fair  valuation  or  appraisement  be  made  by  my  neighbors  of  all 
real  and  personal  estate,  and  then  my  son  Christian  shall  have  the  refusal 
or  acceptance  of  any  one  part  of  my  estate  so  valued.  That  my  real 
estate  consisting  of  two  parts  one  about  seventy  two  acres  and  the  other 
about  sixty  eight  acres  all  situate  in  Forks  Township  shall  be  appraised 
separately  and  if  my  son  Christian  shall  refuse  to  accept  the  same  at  such 
valuation  then  the  same  to  be  sold"  and  appointed  his  son  Christian 
Yeager  his  sole  executor. 

WHEREUPON,  Feb.  21,  1845,  Christian  Yeager,  sole  Executor  last 
Will  and  Testament  of  Philip  Yeager  deceased  in  pursuance  of  such 
directions  chose  Philip  Odenwelder,  Adam  Wagener  and  Jacob  Richards 
as  judicious  persons  of  the  neighborhood  to  value  the  Real  Estate. 

We  the  subscribing  heirs  and  legatees  of  the  said  Philip  Yeager 
deceased  approve  of  the  above  selection. 

Daniel  Spangler  Peter  Yeager 

Maria  Spangler  Jacob  Odenwelder 

Sam'"  Yeager  Elizabeth  Odenwelder 


1  Deed  Book  E  2,  p.  228.     Easton,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Deed  Book  B  7,  pp.  603-604.     Easton,  Pennsylvania. 


192 


THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


The  appraisers  returned  the  valuation  of  "All  that  Certain  Messuage 
or  Tenement  and  tract  of  land  which  is  designed  No.  1  in  draft  hereto 
annexed,  bounded  and  described  as  follows :  adjoining  lands  formerly 
Abraham  Kuhn,  George  William  Roup  and  land  formerly  the  heirs  of 
Paul  Moser,  dec'd,  containing  sixty  seven  acres,  at  the  sum  of  $63  per 
acre. 

All  that  certain  Messuage  and  tract  of  land  designated  as  No.  2  on 
a  draft  hereto  annexed,  bounding  land  formerly  George  Wm  Roup,  in 
tenure  of  widow  ]\Ioser,  land  late  Adam  Konig,  land  late  Henry  Yager, 
and  the  public  road  leading  from  Bethlehem  to  Easton  containing  seventy 
one  acres  at  $52  per  acre."     Feb.  21,  1845. 

Philip  Odenwelder 
Adam  Waggoner 
Jacob  Richards. 

I,  Christian  Yeager  in  pursuance  of  the  right  of  election  given  me 
by  the  Last  Will  and  Testament  of  Philip  Yeager,  dec'd,  do  hereby 
accept  that  part  of  the  said  Real  Estate  marked  No.  1.^ 


1  Deed  Book  7,  p.  606.     Easton,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  YEAGER  FAMILY  193 

Henry  Yeager  and  wife,  Susanna,  on  the  same  day,  June  23, 
1798,  conveyed  to  Christian  Yeager,  another  brother,  in  considera- 
tion of  $1790.00,  a  "stone  messuage  and  tenement  and  tract  of 
land  situate  on  the  road  from  Bethlehem  to  Easton,"  no  doubt  the 
same  bequeathed  to  him  by  his  father,  John.  Christian  died  in 
August,  1820,  intestate,  and  Jacob  Ehrit,  administrator  of  his 
estate,  sold  the  farm  to  Jacob  Edelman,  April  1,  1823.^  Thus  the 
old  homestead  passed  out  of  the  family  possession.  On  the  same 
day  they  also  conveyed  to  Christian  another  tract  of  twelve  acres, 
which  is  described  as  part  of  the  resurvey  of  the  Dry  Land  tract, 
made  to  Henry  Yeager.^ 

Elizabeth  Yeager,  widow  of  John,  died  December  4,  1804, 
and  was  buried  beside  her  husband  in  the  old  St.  John's  Lutheran 
graveyard,  at  Easton.  As  the  city  grew  and  built  up  around  the 
old  churchyard,  the  tombstones  were  finally  removed  and  re-erected 
in  the  Easton  Cemetery  lying  on  the  edge  of  the  town,  and  the 
burial  plot  is  now  occupied  by  business  houses.  The  two  stones 
marking  these  graves  were  placed  in  the  lot  belonging  to  their 
son-in-law,  John  Conrad  Edelman.^  The  stones,  very  dark  slate, 
are  almost  undecipherable  and  could  not  be  photographed.  The 
inscriptions  read: 

Hier 

Ruhet  In  Gott 

Der  See  Lig  Vert-  Johannes  Jager 

1st  GeBoren  Den  9*^^ 

October  Im  Jahr  1721 

In  Der  Ehe  GeLebt  48  Ja' 

Zeugte  Kinder  4  Sohne 

und  5  Tochter 

GestorBen  Den  6*^" 


1  Deed   Book  G-4,  p.  380.     Easton,   Pennsylvania. 

2  Deed   Book  E-2,   p.  227.     Easton,   Pennsylvania. 

3  Anna  Catherine,  second  daughter  of  John  and  Elizabeth  Schneider  Yeager, 
married  March  23,  1773,  Conrad  Edelman,  of  Easton.  The  following  inscriptions 
were  copied  from  the  tombstones  standing  in  the  Edelman  lot  in  Easton  Cemetery, 
The  oldest  stone,  that  of  Maria  Elizabeth  Edelman,  born  Jan.  20,  1722,  died  Sept. 
23,  1804,  is  no  doubt  that  of  Conrad's  mother.  Then  Johan  Conrad  Edelman,  born 
Nov.  20,  1751,  died  Nov.  21,  1807.  Catherine  Edelman,  born  Dec.  11,  1751;  died 
Apr.  22,  1834,  son-in-law  and  daughter  of  John  Yeager.  Elizabeth  Edelman,  born 
Nov.  11,  1780;  died  Jan.  17,  1827,  no  doubt  a  daughter  of  Conrad  and  Catherine. 
Peter  Edelman,  a  son,  born  Feb.  7,  1785;  died  Nov.  11,  1826;  and  Elizabeth,  wife  of 
Peter  Edelman,  born  August  13,  1788;  died  Sept.  11,  1817. 


194  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

April  Im  Jahr  1796 

Alt  Worden  74  Jahr 

5  Monat  und  15  Tage. 

Here  /  rests  in  God  /  the  mortal  body  of 
John  Jager  /  He  was  born  /  October  9,  1721 
/  Lived  in  wedlock  48  years  /  begat  4  sons  / 
and  5  daughters  /  Died  April  6,  1796  /  aged 
74  years  /  5  months  and  15  days. 

Hier 

Ruhet  In  Gott 

See  Lig  Verstorbene 

Elizabeth  Jagerin 

Eine  Gebohrene  Schneyder 

Die  Johannes  Jagers  G 


Eh  Eran  sie  ne  Gebohren 

Den  28'^n  Februari  1728 

Und  Gestorben  den  4'^"  December 

In  Jahr  1804  Ah  Worden 

76  Jahr.  9  monai  und  4  Tage. 

Here  /  rests  in  God  /  the  mortal  body  / 
of  Elizabeth  Jager  /  she  was  born  Schneyder 
/  wife  of  John  Jager  /   She  was  born   28 
February  1728  /  and  died  4  December  1804  / 
aged  76  years  9  months  and  4  days. 

Childrefi  of  John  Ycager  and  Elisabeth  Schneider: 

1.  Anna  Maria  Yeager,  born  January  17,  1749;  died  August  20, 
1828;  married  March  9,  1771, ^  Philip  Odenwelder,  born 
September  2,  1748;  died  May  20,  1828,  son  of  John  Philip 
Odenwelder,  Sr.,  and  wife,  Anna  Maria.  It  was  the  son  of 
Philip  Odenwelder  and  wife,  Anna  Maria  Yeager  who,  when 
appearing  before  the  Orphans'  Court  at  Allentown,  Pa., 
pending  the  settlement  of  the  estate  of  Andrew  Strassburger, 
declared  that  "his  father  and  Andrew  Strassburger  were 
brothers-in-law  and  that  Mr.  Strassburger  on  his  trips  to 
Easton  from  his  farm  in  Lehigh  County  would  stay  over 


1  Records  St.  John's  Lutheran  Church,  Easton,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  YEAGER  FAMILY  195 

night  at  their  home."  Issue :  Anna  Rosina,  born  December 
31,  1776;  John  PhiUp,  born  April  17,  1780;  Elizabeth,  born 
April  9,  1784/ 

2.  Joh.  Christophel  Yeager,  born  January  19,  1751;  baptized  May 

26,  1751,  by  pastor  New  Hanover  Lutheran  Church.  No 
further  record.  Probably  died  young,  as  no  mention  is  made 
of  him  in  his  father's  will. 

3.  Anna  Catharine  Yeager,  born  December   11,   1751;  baptized  at 

New  Hanover,  Pa.,  January  5,  1752;  died  April  22,  1834, 
Easton,  Pa. ;  married  March  23,  1773,^  John  Konrad  Edel- 
man,  born  November  20,  1751,  died  November  21,  1807. 
Issue:  EHzabeth,  born  November  15,  1780,  died  January  17, 
1807;  Peter,  born  February  7,    1785,  died   November   11, 

1826,  married  Elizabeth  ,  born  August  13,   1788, 

died  September  11,  1817.=^ 

4.  EVE  YEAGER,  born  November  24,  1754;  baptized  December 

25,  1754;  died  July  16,  1835;  married  JOHN  ANDREW 
STRASSBURGER. 

5.  John  Yeager,  born  October  31,  1757 ;  baptized  by  pastor  Tohickon 

Reformed  Church,  Bedminster  Township,  Bucks  County, 
Pa.;  married  Catherine  Person,  daughter  of  William  Per- 
son, born  February  13,  1759,  died  September  25,  1817. 

6.  Elizabeth  Yeager,   born   February   19,    1760;   died  October  25, 

1842.*  Unmarried.  Witnessed  the  baptism  of  an  infant 
of  Philip  and  Anna  Maria  Odenwelder,  her  sister. 

7.  Henry  Yeager,  born  February  5,  1762;  died  November  3,  1841; 

married    Susanna    ,    born    June    14,    1768,    died 

February  15,  1844.  They  are  buried  in  the  basement  of 
St.  John's  Lutheran  Church,  Easton,  Pa. 

8.  Philip  Yeager,  born  July  6,  1764;  died  January  5,   1845.     His 

wife,  Anna  Rosina,  was  born  March  3,  1770,  and  died 
December  10,  1844.  They  were  buried  at  Arndt's  Church, 
Forks  Township,  Northampton  Co.,  Pa. 


1  Records  Reformed  Church,  Easton,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Records  St.  John's  Lutheran  Church,  Easton,   Pennsylvania 

3  Tombstone   Inscriptions,   Easton   Cemetery,   Easton,    Pennsylvania. 
*  Records  St.  John's  Lutheran  Church,  Easton,  Pennsylvania. 


196  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

9.     Mary  Yeager. 

10.  Margaret  Yeager. 

11.  Christian  Yeager,  born  February  26,  1770;^  died  August,  1820; 

married  April  2,   1801,  at  Easton,  Eve   Eritt.     Buried  at 
Easton,  Pa. 

DESCENT  FROM  JOHANNES  JAGER. 

Vn.  Johannes  Jager  married  Eve  Elizabeth  Schneider. 

VI.  Eve  Jager  (Yeager)  married  John  Andrew  Strassburger. 

V.  John  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Catherine  Stout. 

IV.  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  married  Elizabeth  Schwenk. 

III.  Jacob   Andrew    Strassburger   married    Mary    Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver   Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


1  Records  St.  John's  Lutheran  Church,  Easton,  Pennsylvania. 


The  SCHN.  ?^   ¥K^..  .i 


•WOH\V  A  ^96,  a  native  of 

oia  in  the  ship 
■  Rotterdam, 

;.  -u  th^  original 

pa.^:;engers  over 

Acl"'  Snider'"'  was  41  years  of 

,  wife,  Elizabeth  and  daughter, 

■    "  •  old,  and  probably  other 

Tov^^nship,  now  Mont- 

;nd  became  members 

:  (-:hurch 

.■;*     .,,..,,,,  .....  eaioy  his  new  home. 

;:.|'\.-re  1746,  for  on  the  Sunday  after 

■  §r.  Eve  Elizabeth  J  or  Anna  Eliza- 

:^  confirmed   by  the  Rev.  Henry 

,...■...,.  |jt  *Talconer  Schv/am/'     In.  this 

^  'ks'/.ribofi  as  Johann  Adam  Meyer's  step- 

::.i!  i«ier  was  dead  and  her  mother  had 

% 

^^  .-    T:!"r.,j- .-fi-j    Schneider    Meyer. 

le  abov<i  being  refer- 

'  daughter  Adam  Scbjieider.    The 

■   '*n)as  Pomp,  v;iiO  offkiated  at  the  funeral 

■  \''-  '"'^r  states  tba"    •"■^'  ■■'  <s  "confirmed 

178)  pa?t-^  'kner  Swamp 

'■\  Schnei- 

:;.     A  CaieiJ.i  "^..uiftiiiiuiOn  of  the 

..Ag  John  Adam  Schneider  and 

•icate  that  this  is  the  record  of  con- 

vn  reterred  :  '\ym'^. 


-  I  •  iinsylvania  .^.r-. 

i  V,'v.  J   J.  Kiinc,   .  z  ^  Penn- 

syi';<M:ii,  p.  58. 


u,  ««;fiii:  .v«i»"fe>r4(R^  'stMJ^'^^-^'  j5fefi:;^T 


CP 


I 


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hi 


The  SCHNEIDER  FAMILY 

JOHAN  ADAM  SCHNEIDER,  born  in  1696,  a  native  of 
Hohenburg,  Germany,  came  to  Pennsylvania  in  the  ship 
Samuel,  Hugh  Perry,  Master  sailing  from  Rotterdam, 
and  arriving  in  Philadelphia,  August  30,  1737/  Upon  the  original 
list  which  gives  the  names  and  ages  of  the  male  passengers  over 
sixteen  years,  we  find  that  "John  Ad™  Snider"  was  41  years  of 
age.  He  was  accompanied  by  his  wife,  Elizabeth  and  daughter, 
Eve  Elizabeth,  the  latter  being  nine  years  old,  and  probably  other 
children.  They  settled  in  New  Hanover  Township,  now  Mont- 
gomery, then  a  part  of  Philadelphia,  County,  and  became  members 
of  Falkner  Swamp,  or  New  Hanover  Lutheran  Church. 

John  Adam  Schneider  did  not  long  live  to  enjoy  his  new  home. 
He  apparently  died  some  time  before  1746,  for  on  the  Sunday  after 
Easter,  of  that  year,  his  daughter,  Eve  Elizabeth,  or  Anna  Eliza- 
beth, as  the  record  reads,  was  confirmed  by  the  Rev.  Henry 
Melchior  Muhlenberg,  pastor  at  "Falconer  Schwam."  In  this 
record,  however,  she  is  described  as  Johann  Adam  Meyer's  step- 
daughter,^ showing  that  her  father  was  dead  and  her  mother  had 
married  a  second  time. 

Nothing  further  is  known  of  Elizabeth  Schneider  Meyer. 
Perhaps  there  might  be  some  question  as  to  the  above  being  refer- 
ences to  the  widow  and  daughter  of  John  Adam  Schneider.  The 
private  record  of  Rev.  Thomas  Pomp,  who  officiated  at  the  funeral 
of  Eve  Elizabeth  Schneider  Yeager  states  that  she  was  "confirmed 
by  the  Rev.  Muhlenberg  (see  page  178)  pastor  of  Falkner  Swamp 
and  the  records  of  this  church  show  only  the  one  Elizabeth  Schnei- 
der confirmed  by  Rev.  Muhlenberg.  A  careful  examination  of  the 
records  for  information  concerning  John  Adam  Schneider  and 
John  Adam  Meyer  seem  to  indicate  that  this  is  the  record  of  con- 
firmation referred  to  by  the  Rev.  Pomp. 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XVII,  pp.  131-134. 

2  Rev.  J.  J.  Kline,  History  of  the  Lutheran  Church,  in  New  Hanover,  Pentt' 
sylvania,  p.  58. 


198  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Children  of  John  Adam  and  Elisabeth  Schneider: 

1.  EVE  ELIZABETH  SCHNEIDER,  born  February  28,   1728; 

died  December  4,  1804;  married  April  12,  1748,  JOHN 
YEAGER. 

2.  John  Adam   Schneider,   probably  a  son.     Married   Ave    (Eva) 

Maria  Klein.  In  1742,  was  living  on  150  acres  in  Mont- 
gomery County,  Pa.,  and  in  1759,  warranted  a  tract  of  land 
adjoining.  A  child  was  baptized  August  16,  1749,  as  shown 
by  record  of  First  Reformed  Church,  Philadelphia.  A 
daughter,  Julianna,  was  married  May  26,  1767,  to  Wendel 
Fischer,  of  Upper  Hanover  Township.  They  were  perhaps 
the  parents  of  Adam  Schneider,  who  married  Margaretha 
Diederich,  May  11,  1774,  First  Reformed  Church,  Philadel- 
phia. 

DESCENT  FROM  JOHAN  ADAM  SCHNEIDER 
VIII.     Johann  Adam  Schneider  married  Elizabeth  . 


VII.  Eve  Elizabeth  Schneider  married  John  Yeager. 

VI.  Eve  Yeager  married  John  Andrew  Strassburger. 

V.  John  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Catherine  Stout. 

IV,  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  married  Elizabeth  Schwenk. 

Ill,  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Mary  Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


Q 

a 

in 


O 


The  STOUT  FAMILY 


JOHN  JACOB  STOUT,  the  pioneer  ancestor  of  this  family, 
was  a  native  of  Switzerland.  He  was  born  in  October, 
1710,  and  came  to  Pennsylvania  as  a  young  man,  accom- 
panied by  his  two  brothers,  so  tradition  has  it.  The  names, 
Johann  Jacob  Staudt,  Johannes  Staudt  and  Hans  Adam  Staut, 
appear  upon  the  list  of  foreigners  who  came  to  this  country  in  the 
ship  Samuel,  sailing  from  Rotterdam  and  arriving  in  Philadelphia 
in  August,  1737,  where,  on  the  30th  of  that  month,  all  three  quali- 
fied as  citizens  of  the  Commonwealth.  According  to  this  list, 
Johaim  Jacob  Staudt  signed  his  own  name  to  the  Declaration, 
whereas  the  names  of  the  other  two,  presumably  his  brothers,  were 
written  by  clerks.    The  original  entry  reads  :^ 

List  of  Foreigners  imported  in  the  ship  Samuel,  Hugh  Percy,  Master, 
from  Rotterdam,    Qualified  August  30,  1737. 
Johann  Jacob  Staudt 
Hans  Adam  Staut 
Johannes  Staudt 

Original  List. 
Hans  Adam  Stout,  19  years. 
Jacob  Stout,  26  years.^ 
Johannes  Stout,  30  years. 

John  Jacob  Stout  settled  in  Bucks  County.  The  brother, 
John,  it  is  said,  took  up  his  residence  in  Germantown.^  Nothing 
further  is  known  of  the  third  brother,  John  Adam. 

At  a  Supreme  Court  held  at  Philadelphia  for  the  Province  of  Penn- 
sylvania, Before  William  Allen,  Lawrence  Growdon  and  Caleb  Cowpland, 
Esquires,  Judges  of  the  said  Court,  on  the  eleventh  day  of  April  1751, 
in  pursuance  of  [the  aforesaid]  Act  of  Parliament,  the  following  Persons 


1 1.  D.  Rupp,  Thirty  Thousand  Names,  pp.  104,  106. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Vol.  XVII,  pp.  131,  135. 

3  William  H.  H.  Davis,  History  of  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania,  Vol.  II,  p.  26. 


200  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

being  Quakers,  or  such  who  Conscientiously  scruple  to  take  an  Oath, 
being  also  Foreigners,  and  having  complied  with  the  Terms  required  by 
[the  aforesaid]  Act  of  Parliament,  took  and  subscribed  the  Qualifications 
for  them  appointed  by  the  same  Act  of  Parliament,  &c. 
Jacob  Stout,  Bucks  County^ 

From  the  above  it  is  observed  that  Jacob  Stout's  name  appears 
among  those  designated  as  "Quakers,  or  such  as  conscientiously 
scruple  to  take  an  oath."  It  is  believed  by  some  of  the  descendants 
that  Jacob  Stout  was  a  Mennonite  and  reared  his  children  in  this 
faith,  though  they  afterwards  became  members  of  the  German 
Reformed  Church.  It  is  true  that  the  German  Baptists  or  Dun- 
kards  were  closely  allied  to  the  Mennonites,  and  as  tradition  says 
that  Jacob  was  a  German  Baptist,  this  would  account  for  his 
religious  objections  to  taking  an  oath  on  the  Holy  Evangels,  an 
objection  strictly  adhered  to  by  Quakers,  Mennonites  and  other 
sects  closely  related  to  these  two. 

In  the  year  1739  Jacob  Stout  married  Anna  Leisse,  widow  of 
John  Leisse,  of  Rockhill  Township,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania. 
John  Leisse  (La  Gene,  Lacey  or  Licey,  as  the  name  has  been  vari- 
ously spelled)  arrived  in  the  ship  Adventurer  from  Rotterdam  and 
qualified  September  23,  1732.  He  was  accompanied  by  his  wife, 
Anna,  aged  twenty-four  years;  a  brother,  Paul  Le  Gene,  with  his 
wife,  Luisa,  and  four  children,  and  a  brother-in-law,  Hans  Michael 
Miller,  and  his  wife.  Even." 

List  of  Foreigners  imported  in  the  ship  Adventurer,  Robert  Carson, 
Master,  from  Rotterdam.    Qualified  September  23,  1732. 
Hans  Michael  Muller 
Paul  Le  Gene 
Jean  Le  Gene 

Original  List. 
Michell  Millier,  30  years. 
Paule  Lissen,  44  years. 
Uelly  Hannah  Lipysine,  24  years. 
Luiss  Lissen,  36  years. 
Marrea  Katterine  Lissine,  9  years. 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Vol.  II,  p.  383. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Vol.  XVII,  pp.  58,  61. 


THICODORE  ROOSEVELT, 

PRESIDENT   OF    THE   UNITED  STATES  OF  AMERICA. 


WllM^a-  .1.14,  /JlS-  &tJcl^^: 


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■ — J-/^ia--<:r-z3i<T2^    /'X^^-rrr.ar^frZ^ 


J,tU-.UAt,?.'/'jiiiA 


Commission  as  Ensign  in  the  United  States  Navy  given  to 
Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  by  Theodore  Roosevelt, 
President  of  the  United  States,  prior  to  confir- 
mation by  the  Senate,  February  2,  1907. 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  201 

Johane  Maria  Lissine,  11  years. 
Larrance  Lessen,  6  years. 
Even  Miller,  30  years. 
Jn°.  Lissen,  46  years. 
Johanna  Luiss  Lissine,  3  years. 

John  Leisse,  under  the  name  of  John  Lacey,  purchased  in 
1735  two  hundred  acres  of  land  in  Rockhill  Township,  Bucks 
County.  He  died  in  1738,  and  his  widow,  the  following  year, 
married  Jacob  Stout.  She  is  said  to  have  been  a  daughter  of  a 
physician.  Dr.  Miller,  in  Germany.'  On  the  above  list  she  appears 
as  "Uelly  Hannah  Lipysine,  aged  twenty-four  years."  ^  The  fact 
that  English  captains  or  clerks  made  up  many  of  the  ship's  rosters 
and  spelled  the  names  of  their  passengers  by  sound  accounts  for 
the  different  forms  of  the  same  name  as  appear  in  this  one  list. 

The  two  hundred  acres  purchased  by  John  Leisse  included 
a  large  part  of  the  present  borough  of  Perkasie.  The  Proprietary's 
Manor  of  Perkasie,  consisting  of  a  tract  of  ten  thousand  acres, 
comprised  all  the  southeastern  part  of  Rockhill,  and  part  of  the 
present  Hilltown,  Townships.  It  was  laid  out  prior  to  1708  and 
opened  for  settlement  and  purchase  about  1730-35." 

In  1759  John  and  Henry  Lacy,  sons  of  John  Lacy  (Leisse), 
deceased,  conveyed  the  original  tract  which  had  been  their  father's 
to  their  step-father,  Jacob  Stout.  At  the  same  time  this  conveyance 
was  made  Jacob  Stout  and  his  wife  sold  to  John  and  Henry  Lacey 
portions  of  two  hundred  and  sixty-six  acres  in  Hilltown  Township, 
which  he  had  purchased  in  1757. 

Deed:  John  and  Henry  Lacey  to  Jacob  Stout,  1759 
Cl)i!5  3n Denture  made  the  Twentieth  Day  of  October  in  the 
Year  of  Our  Lord  One  thousand  Seven  Hundred  and  Fifty  nine  Between 
Henry  Lacy  of  Hilltown  In  the  County  of  Bucks  yeoman  and  Susanna 
his  wife  and  John  Lacy  of  Rockhill  in  the  said  County  Potter  of  the 
other  part  WITNESSETH  that  the  said  Henry  Lacy  and  Susanna  his 
wife  and  John  Lacy  of  Rockhill  in  the  said  County  Potter  (they  the  said 


1  William   H.    H.    Davis,    History   of   Bucks   County,   Pennsylvania,   Vol.    Ill, 
p.  84. 

2  William  H.  H.  Davis,  History  of  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvama,  Vol.  II,  p.  26. 
Battle's  History  of  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania,  p.  619. 


202  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Henry  and  John  being  the  only  Issue  of  John  Lacy  late  of  the  said  County 
yeoman  deceased)  of  the  one  part  AND  Jacob  Stout  of  Rockhill  aforesaid 
Potter  of  the  other  part  Witnesseth  that  the  said  Henry  Lacy  and  Susanna 
his  wife  and  John  Lacy,  the  sons  For  and  in  Consideration  of  the  sum  of 
Five  hundred  Pounds  to  them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  Jacob  Stout  ****** 
HAVE  Granted,  Bargained,  Sold,  Released  and  Confirmed  unto  the  said 
Jacob  Stout  ALL  THAT  messuage  or  tenement  Plantation  and  tract  of 
land  thereunto  belonging  situate  in  Rockhill  aforesaid  —  Beginning  at 
a  post  on  the  west  side  of  the  North  branch  of  the  Perkiomy  Creek  thence 
north  west  by  the  lands  late  of  Thomas  Freame  deceased,  two  hundred 
and  thirty  seven  perches  to  a  post,  thence  North  East  by  the  said  Freame 
land  one  hundred  and  twenty  eight  perches  to  a  post,  thence  by  the 
same  land  South  East  two  hundred  and  ninety  perches  to  a  post  on  the 
Bank  of  the  said  North  Branch  then  down  the  same  to  the  place  of 
beginning  Containing  two  hundred  acres  |  Part  of  Two  Thousand  five 
hundred  Acres  which  is  part  of  Ten  Thousand  Acres  which  William  Penn 
the  late  Proprietary  &c  by  a  Certain  Proprietary  Patent  or  Grant  under 
his  hand  and  Great  seal  of  the  said  Province  bearing  Date  the  fifth  Day 
of  October  1701  Granted  unto  Samuel  Carpenter,  Edward  Pennington, 
and  Isaac  Norris  and  their  heirs  for  Ever  Under  the  Yearly  Quit  Rent 
of  One  Indian  Corn,  and  in  the  same  patent  it  is  declared  that  the  Estate 
thereby  made  is  so  made  and  granted  To  the  Use  of  the  said  Proprietarys 
Son  John  Penn  and  his  the  said  Proprietary's  Children  begotten  or  to  be 
begotten  on  his  wife  Hannah,  his  then  Wife,  to  be  Equally  devided 
between  them  And  to  their  heirs  forever  And  they  the  said  Samuel  Car- 
penter, Edward  Pennington,  Isaac  Norris,  having  not  made  any  sale  or 
Demise  by  the  Authority  thereby  given  them  died  and  the  said  Isaac 
Norris  last  Dying  his  Eldest  Son  and  Heir  at  Law  Isaac  joining  with  the 
said  Proprietary's  Sons  and  Daughters  by  Hannah  his  wife  aforesaid 
vizt  John  Penn,  Thomas  Penn  and  Richard  Penn,  and  Thomas  Freame 
and  Margaret  his  wife,  (They  the  said  John  Penn,  Thomas  Penn. 
Richard  Penn  and  Margaret  Freame  being  all  the  children  which  the 
said  Proprietary  William  Penn  had  by  his  said  Wife  Hannah)  They  the 
said  John  Penn  Thomas  Penn  Richard  Penn  by  his  attorney  the  said 
Thomas  Penn  and  Thomas  Freame  and  Margaret  his  wife  made  Partition 
whereby  Certain  Two  Thousand  Five  hundred  Acres  became  the  share  of 
the  said  Thomas  Freame  and  Margaret  his  Wife  in  Right  of  the  said 
Margaret  the  Petitioner  by  Indenture  Quinque  partite  bearing  Date  the 
Sixth  day  of  August  1735  (Recorded  in  Philadelphia  Book  F.  Vol.  8, 
p.  335)  And  the  said  Thomas  Freame  and  Margaret  his  wife  by  Indenture 
of  the  Nineteenth  day  of  November  1736  (Recorded  in  Bucks  Deed  Book 
C.  Vol.  2,  p.  205)  granted  the  said  two  hundred  acres  *****  Part  of  the 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  203 

aforesaid  two  Thousand  and  five  hundred  Acres  unto  the  said  John  Lacy 
the  Father  in  Fee.  AND  He  the  said  John  Lacy  the  Father  Dying 
Intestate  of  the  premises  the  same  Descended  and  Came  unto  the  said 
Henry  and  John  Lacy  the  sons.  And  the  said  Jacob  Stout  Intermarrying 
with  Anna  the  widow  and  Relict  of  the  said  John  Lacy  the  Father,  they 
the  said  Jacob  Stout  and  Anna  his  Wife  by  Indenture  the  14*^  day  of 
October  1759  Released  the  Right  of  Dower  of  her  the  said  Anna  unto 
them  the  said  Henry  Lacy  and  John  Lacy  the  sons  *******=k***  j]^ 
WITNESS  whereof  the  said  Parties  to  these  presents  have  Interchange- 
ably set  their  Hands  and  Seals  the  hereunto  Dated  the  Day  and  Year 
First  above  Written.^ 

Hendrick  Lacy 
Susannah  Lacy 
Johannes  Lacy 

The  first  purchase  of  land  by  Jacob  Stout  was  a  tract  of  two 
hundred  and  forty-three  acres  now  in  Williams  Township,  North- 
ampton County,  which  he  acquired  in  1750  from  John  Eastburn 
and  wife,  of  Philadelphia,  for  three  hundred  and  sixty  pounds. 
His  residence  at  this  time  was  given  as  "Durham  Township,  Bucks 
County,"  the  early  name  for  Williams  Township.  In  1753  he 
purchased  a  mill  property  at  Church  Hill  in  Rockhill  Township, 
and  in  1767  the  mill  property  on  Pine  Run,  one  mile  north  of 
Doylestown,  embracing  one  hundred  and  nineteen  acres,  which 
in  1770  he  conveyed  to  his  son-in-law,  Abraham  Freed. 

In  1774  Mr.  Stout  bought  one  hundred  and  fifty  acres  in 
New  Britain  Township,  on  which  he  settled  his  daughter  Catherine, 
who  had  married  Jacob  Schleiffer.  The  Northampton  County 
property  descended  to  his  son  Isaac  and  remained  in  the  possession 
of  that  family  for  several  generations.  He  also  owned  twenty-five 
acres  and  a  mill  in  Bedminster  Township,  on  Tohickon  Creek.^ 

Jacob  Stout  was  a  potter  by  trade,  and  no  doubt  followed  this 
occupation  for  some  years  after  his  arrival  in  this  country.  The 
fact  that  he  was  able  to  buy  as  much  land  as  he  did  seems  to  con- 
firm the  family  tradition  that  the  Stout  brothers  brought  a  large 
inheritance  with  them  from  the  old  country.  An  immense  wooden 
chest,  iron  clamped,  was  brought  by  the  brothers  from  across  the 


1  Deed  Book  No.  10,  p.  174.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Bucks  County  Intelligencer,  September  22,  1888.     William  H.  H.  Davis,  His- 
tory of  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania,  Vol.  II,  p.  26. 


204  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

sea.  This  chest  descended  to  Jacob  and  remained  in  the  family 
until  a  few  years  ago,  when  the  old  homestead,  afterwards  occupied 
by  Enos  Stout,  great-grandson  of  Jacob,  was  destroyed  by  fire,  and 
this  and  other  valuable  relics  w^ere  lost.  There  was  a  small  com- 
partment in  the  chest  which  was  used  as  a  receptacle,  so  it  was 
asserted,  where  the  brothers  kept  their  valuables  while  on  the 
long  journey. 

These  chests  played  a  most  important  part  in  the  life  and 
destinies  of  many  of  these  early  German  emigrants.  "They  brought 
but  little  property  with  them.  A  few  pieces  of  silver  coin  or  gold, 
a  chest  with  clothes,  a  Bible,  a  prayer  or  hymn  book,  constituted 
the  whole  stock  of  most  of  them.  Many,  who  at  home  had  owned 
property  and  converted  it  into  money,  w^ere  robbed  in  transit  by 
ship  owners,  impostors,  sea  captains  and  Neulaender.  The  emi- 
grant chests  with  their  clothes  and  sometimes  their  money  were 
put  on  other  vessels  or  ships  and  left  behind.  These  chests  were 
rifled  of  their  contents.  The  German  emigrants  thus  treated  on 
their  arrival  at  Philadelphia  were  obliged  to  submit  to  being  sold. 
Loskaenflinge  Redemptioners,  they  and  their  children  had  to  pay 
their  passage  money.  In  not  a  few  cases  persons  who  still  had 
means  were  held  responsible  to  pay  passage  of  the  poorer.  This 
was  practiced  for  fifty  years.  In  this  way  persons  of  substance 
became  very  frequently  common  beggars."^ 

As  before  stated,  on  October  20,  1759,  John  and  Henry  Lacey 
sold  to  their  step-father,  Jacob  Stout,  the  two  hundred  acres  in 
Rockhill  originally  taken  up  by  their  father,  John  Lacey.  Before 
this  their  mother,  Ann,  had  released  or  sold  her  dower  rights  to 
her  sons,  who  upon  coming  of  age  in  1759,  in  consideration  of  five 
hundred  pounds,  made  over  all  their  right  and  title  in  the  same  to 
their  step-father.  This  w^as  the  homestead  of  his  later  years  and 
it  embraced  most  of  the  land  on  which  the  borough  of  Perkasie  is 
built.  Mr.  Stout  soon  erected  for  himself  a  large  stone  dwelling 
which  stood  on  the  side  of  Tunnel  Creek,  below  the  railroad  station 
on  the  western  outskirts  of  Perkasie.  It  was  destroyed  by  fire  a 
few  years  ago." 


1  Gordon's  History  of  Pennsylvania,  p.  300. 

-  J.  H.  Battle,  History  of  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania,  p.  619.  William  H.  H. 
Davis,  History  of  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania,  Vol.  II,  p.  26.  Montgomery 
County  Newspaper  Clippings,  Vol.  VI,  p.  74. 


Tombstones  of  Jacob  Stout  and  wife,  old  Stout  Graveyard,  Perkasie,  Pa. 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  205 

Jacob  Stout  was  a  successful  and  prominent  man  in  the 
community.  He  died  April  30,  1779,  aged  over  sixty-eight  years, 
and  lies  in  the  little  burial  plot  originally  a  part  of  the  farm,  near 
the  railroad  station,  known  as  Stout's  Graveyard.  His  is  the  oldest 
tombstone  in  the  cemetery.    The  inscription  reads: 

Jacob  Staut 

den  30  April  1779 

alt  68>4  yahr 

The  letters  and  figures  are  almost  undecipherable.     Some 
years  ago  this  old  stone  cracked  and  fell  and  a  new  stone  was 
erected  in  its  place,  upon  which  was  inscribed  the  English  transla- 
tion of  the  inscription.     There  was  also  erected  a  small  stone, 
adjoining,  in  memory  of  his  wife,  Anna  Miller   (Lacy)   Stout 
upon  which  is  inscribed  merely  her  name,  as  neither  the  date  of 
her  birth  nor  that  of  her  death  was  known.    The  photograph  which 
appears  elsewhere  shows  the  two  new  stones,  the  old  marker,  desig- 
nating the  grave  of  Jacob  Stout,  can  be  seen  lying  on  the  ground. 
In  this  same  little  graveyard  lie  buried  Abraham  Stout  and  his 
wife,  Magdalena  Hartzell;  also  two  children  of  Rev.  John  Andrew 
Strassburger   and  his  wife,   Catherine   Stout,   granddaughter  of 
Abraham  and  Magdalena.  _ 

Jacob  Stout  left  no  will,  nor  were  any  Letters  of  Administration 
issued  at  the  time  of  his  death.    From  a  deed  under  date  of  Jan- 
uary 24    1783,  in  which  the  heirs  of  Jacob  Stout  release  to  Jacob 
Schleiffer  and  Catherine,  his  wife,  the  farm  in  New  Britain  Town- 
ship, which  had  belonged  to  their    father,    we    learn    that    he 
left  four  children,  Abraham,  Isaac,  Salome  and  Catherine,  to  whom 
all  his  estate  descended;  all  being  of  full  age,  they  mutually  agreed 
to  partition  and  allot  the  lands  among  themselves.    Jacob  Schleifter 
and  his  wife,  Catherine,  had  been  living  for  a  number  of  years 
on  the  farm,  which  Jacob  Stout  had  settled  upon  his  daughter 
Catherine  in  1770.    By  agreement  among  the  heirs,  this  farm  was 
now  allotted  to  Jacob  and  Catherine  Schleiffer,  who  continued  to 
reside  here  until  their  death,  when  it  descended  to  their  children 
and  thus  remained  in  the  Schleiffer  family  until  1822. 


206  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Deed:  Abraham  Stout  et  al  to  Jacob  Schleiffer,  1783 

To  all  People  to  whom  these  Presents  shall  Come  Abraham  Stout 
of  the  Township  of  Rockhill  in  the  county  of  Bucks,  yeoman,  and 
Magdalena  his  wife,  Isaac  Stout  of  Williams  Township  in  the  county 
of  Northampton,  yeoman,  and  Barbara  his  wife,  Gabriel  Schwartzlander 
of  the  township  of  New  Britain  in  county  of  Bucks,  yeoman,  and  Salome 
his  wife,  all  of  Pennsylvania,  Send  Greeting  Whereas  Jacob  Stout  Late 
of  Rockhill  Township  aforesaid  Potter,  deceased,  was  in  his  life  time 
and  at  the  time  of  his  Death  seized  in  fee  of  and  in  certain  Lands  and 
Real  Estate  situate  in  the  counties  of  Bucks  and  Northampton  by  whose 
death  the  said  Lands  and  Real  Estate  descended  and  came  to  and  among 
his  Children  who  are  (only)  four  in  Number  to  wit  Abraham  Stout, 
Isaac  Stout  and  Salome  the  wife  of  Gabriel  Swartzlander  herein  above 
named  and  Catherine  the  wife  of  Jacob  Shleiffer  of  the  township  of 
New  Britain  aforesaid,  yeoman,  who  being  all  of  full  age  have  mutually 
and  unanimously  agreed  to  a  partition  and  allotment  of  the  said  Lands 
and  Real  Estate  into  parts  and  shares  amongst  themselves  by  which 
agreement  the  part  or  shares  of  said  Jacob  Shleiffer  and  Catherine  his 
wife  in  right  of  said  Catherine  which  is  thereby  intended  to  be  confirmed 
to  as  allotted  to  them  as  follows  that  is  Consisting  of  one  tract  of  land 
situate  in  the  township  of  New  Britain  aforesaid  which  was  conveyed  to 
said  Jacob  Stout,  deceased,  by  Edward  Mathew  of  New  Britain  afsd  and 
Catherine  his  wife  by  Indenture  bearing  date  July  29,  1774,  adjoining 
lands  late  Thomas  John  now  Benjamin  John,  land  late  Tobias  Kirkbride, 
Thomas  Edwards  now  David  Kennedy,  Thomas  Jones,  John  Kelly,  land 
late  William  Williams,  now  Abraham  Krotz)  containing  150>^  acres** 
Now  to  the  end  that  the  said  Mutual  Agreement  may  be  fulfilled  and 
the  said  Partition  and  Allotment  may  be  unalterably  ratified  and  con- 
firmed and  they  the  said  Jacob  Shleiffer  and  Catherine  his  wife  (in 
Consideration  of  their  releasing  in  like  manner  to  the  others  may  be 
fully  secured  in  the  possession  and  enjoyment  of  the  said  Dividend  in 
severalty  as  the  part  or  share  of  the  said  Catherine  of  the  lands  and 
Real  Estate  of  her  Father  the  said  Jacob  Stout,  deceased,  to  hold  the  same 
in  severalty  to  them  the  said  Jacob  Shleiffer  and  Catherine  his  wife  *  * 
Know  ye  that  the  said  Abraham  Stout  and  Magdalena  his  wife,  Isaac 
Stout  and  Barbara  his  wife,  Gabriel  Swartzlander  and  Salome  his  wife 
and  each  and  every  of  them  have  granted  released  and  confirmed  to  the 
aforesaid  Jacob  Shleiffer  and  Catherine  his  wife  in  right  of  the  said 
Catherine,  all  the  herein  above  mentioned  tract  of  one  hundred  and  fifty 
and  one  half  acres.    In  witness  whereof  the  said  parties  to  these  presents 


W  Mil     ilfsW'i    1       SSSl  <i 

;l    IT  '|ilByi|  I 


,  i,ir    Jiiiits^ 


Carpenter's  Hall. 


i:?;-  ^^ 


'^^4, 


-«'# 


"AS  V 


Geniiantc  )\vn  Academy. 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  207 

have  hereunto  interchangeably  set  their  hands  and  seals  the  twenty  fourth 
day  of  January  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
eighty-three.^ 

her 
Gabriel  Swartzlander  Barbara  X  Stout 

mark 
Salome  Swartzlander  Abraham  Stout 

her 
Isaac  Stout  Magdalena  M  Stout 

mark 


Children  of  Jacob  Stout  and  Anna  Miller  Lacey: 

1.  ABRAHAM  STOUT,  born  August  17,  1740 ;  died  June  8,  1812 ; 

married  MARY  MAGDALENA  HARTZELL. 

2.  Isaac  Stout,  settled  on  his  father's  Northampton  County  tract 

and  reared  a  family,  among  whom  was  Dr.  Abraham  Stout. 
He  inherited  the  Northampton  County  farm. 

3.  Elizabeth  Salome  Stout,  married  (1st)  Abraham  Freed;  after  his 

death  in  1773,  married  Gabriel  Swartzlander,  and  lived  and 
died  at  what  was  known  for  a  century  as  "Swartzlander's 
Mill,"  one  mile  north  of  Doylestown,  and  left  many  descend- 
ants, among  whom  is  Dr.  Frank  Swartzlander,  of  Doyles- 
town. 

4.  Catherine  Stout,  married  Jacob  Schleiffer  and  lived  and  died  in 

New  Britain,  Pa. 

ABRAHAM  STOUT,  eldest  son  of  Jacob  Stout  and  his  wife, 
Anna  Miller  (Lacey),  was  born  in  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania, 
August  17,  1740,  and  died  on  the  farm  near  Perkasie  June  8,  1812. 
He  married  October  21,  1773,  Mary  Magdalena  Hartzell,  daughter 
of  Henry  Hartzell,  a  prominent  citizen  of  Rockhill  Township. 
She  died  November  8,  1811.  The  records  of  Tohickon  Reformed 
Church  have  this  entry:  "Buried  November  10,  1811,  Abraham 
Stout's  wife."' 

His  brothers  and  sisters,  following  the  death  of  their  father, 
Jacob,  by  a  deed  of  release  relinquished  to  Abraham  Stout  all 


^  Deed  Book  No.  36,  p.  116H-     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 

*  Records  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  Bucks   County,  Pennsylvania. 


208  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

their  right  to  the  homestead  plantation  and  here  he  resided  all  of 
his  life. 

Deed:  Heirs  of  Jacob  Stout  Deceased  to  Abraham  Stout,  1783 

To  All  to  whom  these  Presents  shall  come  Isaac  Stout  of  Williams 
Township  in  the  county  of  Northampton  Yeoman  and  Barbara  his  wife, 
Gabriel  Schwartzlander  of  the  Township  of  New  Brittain  in  the  county  of 
Bucks,  Yeoman  and  Salome  his  wife.  Jacob  Schleiffer  of  the  same  Town- 
ship of  New  Brittain  and  county  of  Bucks  Yeoman  and  Catherine  his  wife 
—all  of  Pennsylvania  SEND  GREETING  Whereas  Jacob  Stout  late  of 
Rockhill  Township  in  the  County  of  Bucks,  Potter,  deceased  was  in  his 
lifetime  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  seized  in  fee  of  and  in  certain  Lands 
&  Real  Estate  situate  in  the  counties  of  Bucks  and  Northampton,  by  whose 
Death  the  said  Lands  and  Real  Estate  descended  and  came  to  and  among 
his  children  who  are  (only)  four  in  number  to  wit:  Isaac  Stout,  Salome, 
wife  of  Gabriel  Schwartzlander,  and  Catherine  the  wife  of  Jacob  Schleiffer, 
herein  above  named  and  Abraham  Stout  of  Rockhill  Township  aforesaid 
yeoman  who  being  all  of  full  age  have  mutually  and  unanimously  agreed 
to  a  Partition  and  allotment  of  the  said  lands  and  Real  Estate  into  parts 
and  shares  amongst  themselves  :  by  which  agreement  the  part  or  share  of 
the  said  Abraham  Stout  (which  is  hereby  intended  to  be  confirmed)  was 
allotted  to  him  as  follows,  that  is  consisting  of  one  Tract  of  land  situate 
in  the  township  of  Rockhill  aforesaid  which  was  granted  and  confirmed 
unto  the  said  Jacob  Stout  deceased  in  Fee  by  henry  Lacy  of  Hilltown  and 
Susanna  his  wife  and  John  Lacy  of  Rockhill  in  the  county  of  Bucks  afore- 
said by  Indenture  bearing  date  the  twentieth  day  of  October  in  the  Year 
of  Our  Lord  1759  described  as  follows  vizt:  Beginning  at  a  Post  on  the 
west  side  of  the  North  Branch  of  Perkiomy  Creek  Thence  North  West  by 
the  land  late  of  Thomas  Freame  deceased  Two  Hundred  and  thirty  seven 
Perches  to  a  Post  thence  North  east  by  said  Freames  land  ******  thence 
by  the  same  land  south  ********  to  a  Post  on  the  Bank  of  the  North 
Branch  thence  down  the  same  to  the  place  of  Beginning,  Containing  200 
acres  *******  Now  To  the  End  that  the  said  mutual  agreement  may  be 
fulfilled  and  the  said  Partition  and  AUottment  may  be  unalterably  ratified 
and  confirmed,  and  the  said  Abraham  Stout    (in  consideration  of  his 
releasing  in  Like  manner  to  the  others)   May  be  fully  secured  in  the 
Possession  &  Enjoyment  of  the  said  Dividend  in  Severalty  as  his  part  or 
share  of  the  Lands  and  Real  Estate  of  his  Father  the  said  Jacob  Stout 
deceased  to  hold  the  same  in  severalty  to  him  the  s^  Abraham  Stout  his 
heirs  and  assigns  forever.     KNOW  YE  that  the  said  Isaac  Stout  and 
Barbara  his  wife  Gabriel   Schwartzlander  and   Salome  his  wife  Jacob 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  209 

Schleiffer  and  Catherine  his  wife  and  each  and  every  of  them  HAVE 

granted  assigned  alHened  Released  and  Confirmed  to  the  said  Abraham 

Stout  his  heirs  and  assigns  forever  All  that  herein  Mentioned  Tract  of 

Two  hundred  acres  of  Land   ********  jj-^  Witness  Whereof  the  said 

Parties  to  these  Presents  have  Interchangeably  put  their  hands  and  seals 

hereunto  The  Twenty  Fourth  Day  of  January  In  the  Year  of  Our  Lord 

One  Thousand  Seven  Hundred  and  Eighty  Three — 1783/ 

Gabriel  Schwartzlander  Isaac  Stout 

Salome  J.  Schwartzlander  Barbara  C.  Stout 

Catherine  Schlieffer  Jacob  Schleiffer 

Abraham  Stout  was  probably  the  most  prominent  and  best 
educated  Pennsylvania  German  of  his  time  in  Bucks  County.  He 
was  educated  at  the  famous  Germantown  Academy,  under  the 
tuition  of  Hilarius  Becker,  professor  of  German,  and  David  J. 
Dove,  instructor  in  English.  He  thus  acquired  a  thorough  knowl- 
edge of  the  English  language,  an  accomplishment  exceedingly  rare 
at  that  early  date,  as  well  as  a  thorough  scientific  training.  He 
was  an  excellent  accountant  and  penman  and  a  good  business  man. 
His  services  were  much  in  demand  among  his  German  neighbors 
as  a  surveyor  and  scrivener.  From  an  examination  of  old  papers 
on  file  in  the  county  office  it  would  appear  he  drew  a  majority  of 
the  deeds,  wills  and  other  legal  papers  for  his  locality  for  a  number 
of  years.  He  was  constantly  in  demand  by  the  Court  to  serve  as 
one  of  the  auditors  appointed  to  prepare  the  accounts  of  adminis- 
trators and  executors  of  estates,  many  of  these  papers  being  models 
of  penmanship,  conciseness  and  neatness. 

Abraham  Stout  was  among  the  foremost  in  the  neighborhood 
to  enter  protest  against  the  oppressive  acts  of  Great  Britain  and 
was  named  as  a  member  of  the  Committee  of  Safety  from  Rockhill 
Township  in  1775.  When,  however,  it  became  apparent  that  the 
colonists  were  to  resort  to  arms  he  asked  to  be  relieved  from  serving, 
and  another  was  appointed  in  his  place,  and  he  thereafter  held 
aloof  from  active  participation  in  the  struggle.  No  doubt  he  was 
influenced  by  his  early  religious  training  and  held  conscientious 
scruples  against  taking  up  arms,  as  there  is  evidence  to  show  that 
his  sympathies  were  with  the  patriots'  side. 


1  Deed  Book  No.  21,  p.  67.    Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


210  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

During  the  war  he  had  a  recess  made  in  the  cellar  wall,  where 
he  kept  money  and  valuable  papers  to  preserve  them  against  the 
raids  of  Doans  and  Tories.  The  Doans,  a  daring  band  of  outlaws, 
used  his  pasture  along  the  east  bank  of  the  Perkiomen  Creek  during 
the  night  time  for  a  whole  summer.  In  the  morning  they  would 
leave  with  their  horses  for  the  shelter  of  the  rocky  ridges  and  re- 
turn again  in  the  evening.  He  did  not  dispute  his  rights  with 
them  and  they  did  not  further  molest  him.  During  the  memorable 
winter  of  1777-78,  after  the  battle  of  Germantown,  and  when 
the  British  were  in  possession  of  Philadelphia,  a  troop  of  Dragoons, 
fifty-six  men,  visited  the  Stout  homestead  and  quartered  them- 
selves on  the  premises  for  the  winter.  "They  fed  their  horses  from 
the  well-supplied  store  of  hay  and  grain  in  the  barn,  while  the 
soldiers  ate  up  all  the  house  contained,  excepting  the  smoked  meat 
which  the  family  had  taken  the  precaution  to  hide  by  burying  it  in 
advance  of  their  coming."^ 

After  the  close  of  the  war  Abraham  Stout  became  a  prominent 
figure  in  public  affairs.  He  was  a  Justice  of  the  Peace,  and  was 
one  of  the  delegates  from  Bucks  County  to  the  Constitutional  Con- 
vention of  1787-1789  and  took  an  active  part  in  framing  the  first 
Constitution  of  the  State  of  Pennsylvania." 

On  May  16,  1782,  Nicholas  Kease  and  wife,  Elizabeth,  con- 
veyed to  Abraham  Stout,  George  Nase  and  others,  all  of  Rockhill, 
"in  consideration  of  the  love  and  zeal  they  bear  for  the  Promotion 
of  the  useful  learning  and  Christian  knowledge  as  also  for  the  con- 
sideration of  five  shillings"  a  lot  of  ground  in  Rockhill,  in  trust 
for  a  Common  Union  Christian  School.  This  lot  adjoined  the 
land  of  Abraham  Stout. 

Deed:  Nicholas  Kease  and  Wife  to  Abraham  Stout  et  al,  1782 

This  Indenture  Made  the  Sixteenth  day  of  May  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  One  thousand  seven  hundred  and  eighty-two  Between  Nicholas 
Kease  of  the  Township  of  Rockhill  in  the  County  of  Bucks  in  Pennsyl- 
vania, yeoman,  and  Elizabeth  his  wife,  of  the  one  part,  and  Abraham 


1  The  Central  News,  October  14,  1888.     Perkasie,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania. 
Bucks  County  Intelligencer,  August  22,  1888. 

2  William   H.    H.    Davis,   History    of   Bucks   County,  Peiuisylvania,   Vol.    III. 
p.  85. 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  211 

Stout,  Christian  Detterer,  Isaac  Hunsperger  and  George  Nase  of  the 
Township  of  Rockhill  aforsaid,  yeoman,  of  the  other  part.  Witnesseth 
that  the  said  Nicholas  Kease  and  EHzabeth  his  wife  for  and  in  considera- 
tion of  the  Love  and  Zeal  they  bear  for  the  Promotion  of  the  useful 
Learning  and  Christian  Knowledge  as  also  in  Consideration  of  the  Sum 
of  five  shillings  current  Money  of  Pennsylvania  they  the  said  Nicholas 
Kease  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  have  given  granted,  bargained,  sold  released 
and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Abraham  Stout  Christian  Detterer,  Isaac 
Hunsperger  and  George  Nase  In  trust  for  a  Common  Union  Christian 
School,  a  lot  or  piece  of  land  situate  in  the  township  of  Rockhill  afs'd 
adjoining  lands  of  Abraham  Stout,  Conrad  Nagel,  Nicholas  Kease,  con- 
taining 106  perches  of  land  *  *  *  To  the  only  proper  use,  benefit 
and  behoof  of  them  Abraham  Stout,  Christian  Detterer,  Isaac  Hunsperger 
and  George  Nase.  In  trust  for  the  use  and  benefit  of  a  Common  Union 
Christian  School  forever  *  *  In  witness  whereof  the  said  parties  to  these 
presents  have  interchangeably  set  their  hands  and  seals  Dated  on  the  day 
and  year  first  above  written.^ 

Nicholas  Kease 
her 

Elizabeth   X   Kease 
mark 

Abraham  Stout  died  June  8,  1812,  on  the  farm  where  he  had 
spent  all  his  life,  and  was  buried  beside  his  father  and  mother  and 
wife  in  the  family  burial  lot  on  the  plantation.  The  pastor  of 
Tohickon  Church  thus  recorded  upon  his  docket:"  "Buried  June  9, 
1812,  Abraham  Stout,  aged  72  years." 

The  will  of  Abraham  Stout,  dated  May  14,  1812,  is  a  docu- 
ment interesting,  if  not  remarkable,  in  more  respects  than  one.  It 
was  written  by  the  testator  himself  and  the  penmanship  is  rarely 
equalled  at  this  day.  To  his  son,  Jacob,  he  left  the  larger  part 
of  the  homestead  farm  at  Perkasie,  and  to  his  son,  Abraham,  he 
bequeathed  the  remainder.  To  his  son,  Henry  Hartzell  Stout,  he 
left  a  tract  of  land  in  Brush  Valley,  Center  County,  Pa.,  while  he 
made  ample  provision  for  his  daughters. 


1  Deed  Book  No.  19,  p.  417.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 

1  Records  Tohickon  Reformed  Church.     Bucks  County,   Pennsylvania. 


212  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Will  of  Abraham  Stout,  1812 

In  the  name  of  God  amen  I  Abraham  Stout  of  the  township  of  Rock- 
hill  in  the  County  of  Bucks  and  Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania,  yeoman 
being  aged  but  of  sound  mind  and  memory  (thanks  be  to  God)  do  this 
Fourteenth  day  of  JMay  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight 
hundred  and  twelve  make  and  publish  and  with  my  own  hand  write  this 
my  last  Will  and  Testament  in  the  following  manner  that  is  to  say 
Imprimis  I  commend  my  soul  into  the  hands  of  Almighty  God  my  Creator 
and  my  body  to  the  earth  to  be  decently  and  in  a  Christian  like  manner 
buried  in  hopes  of  a  Joyful  resurrection  through  the  merits  of  my  Savior 
Jesus  Christ  and  as  for  the  temporal  estate  wherewith  it  has  pleased  God 
to  bless  me  I  dispose  thereof  as  follows  first  I  order  my  Just  debts  and 
funeral  expences  to  be  paid  out  of  my  personal  estate  Item  I  give  unto 
my  Daughter  Hannah  Worman  thirty  yards  of  my  flaxon  linnen  one 
third  part  of  all  my  flax  one  half  part  of  all  my  soap  six  bushels  of  Rye 
two  bushels  of  wheat  and  my  oval  walnut  table  and  the  priviledg  to  dwell 
in  the  western  Stove  room  during  the  time  she  remains  a  widow  Item  I 
give  unto  my  son  Abraham  Stout  my  Grey  horse  with  the  saddle  and 
bridle  my  Bed  and  Bed  stead  with  all  the  furniture  and  Blue  stiped 
Curtains  and  the  Bed  and  Bedstead  wherein  he  usually  sleeps  my  kitchen 
Dresser  my  milk  Shelve  my  new  Walnut  table  one  cow  to  chuse  which  he 
pleases  three  Sheep  three  Swine  the  Chest  in  my  room  and  the  sum  of 
sixty  Dollars  in  money  which  I  have  paid  unto  him  all  which  I  give  and 
allow  unto  him  for  services  he  did  unto  me  after  he  was  of  lawful  age 
Item  I  give  and  devise  unto  my  son  Henry  H.  Stout  my  tract  of  land 
situate  in  Brush  Valley  formerly  in  the  County  of  Northumberland  but 
now  in  Centre  County  bounded  by  lands  of  Henry  Bolander  and  Andrew 
]\Ioore  containing  two  hundred  and  fourteen  acres  and  fifty  five  perches 
and  allowance  of  six  per  cent  for  roads  together  wath  the  hereditaments 
and  appurtenances  thereunto  belonging  To  have  and  to  hold  the  said  tract 
of  two  hundred  and  fourteen  acres  and  fifty  five  perches  of  land,  with 
the  allowance  and  appurtenances  thereunto  belonging  unto  my  said  son 
Henry  H.  Stout  his  heirs  and  assigns  forever  Item  I  give  and  devise 
unto  my  son  Abraham  Stout  a  part  of  the  Plantation  on  which  I  dwell 
Beginning  at  a  Corner  of  John  Grofif's  land  in  a  line  of  land  belonging 
to  John  Landes  and  from  thence  extending  by  land  of  said  John  Landes 
Jacob  Stout  Benjamin  Rosenberger  and  Henry  GrofT  to  the  middle  of  the 
north  east  Branch  of  Perquiomey  Creek  thence  up  said  Creek  to  the  mid- 
dle of  the  old  swamp  publick  road  thence  up  the  said  road  to  a  marked 
walnut  tree  thence  a  course  north  forty  degrees  east  to  the  middle  fence 
between  the  meadow  and  upland  thence  up  along  the  middle  fence  to  the 


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Certificate  of   graduation  conferred  l)y  the  Academic    Board   of   the 

United    States    Xaval  Academy  on  the  25th  of  Fel)ruary,  1907, 

upcju  [Midshipman  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  on  completion 

of  the  two-year  course  at  sea  and  the  termination  of 

the  six-year  course  prior  to  receipt  of  commission. 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  213 

middle  of  the  lane  thence  down  the  same  to  the  middle  of  the  run  and 
from  thence  a  straight  line  to  a  black  walnut  tree  standing  at  a  corner  of 
my  little  meadow  thence  a  course  either  south  forty  degrees  west  or  north 
forty  degrees  east  so  far  that  a  course  running  parallel  with  the  first  men- 
tioned course  to  John  Groff's  line  doth  contain  eighty  acres  and  three 
acres  allowance  for  Roads  and  another  tract  or  piece  of  land  situate  in  the 
township  of  Rockhill  aforesaid  bounded  by  lands  of  John  Landes  Adam 
Kim  John  Hoot  John  Zeegafoos  and  the  College  land  containing  twenty 
acres  together  with  the  Buildings  the  stove  in  the  old  stove  room  except 
the  Clock  and  Case)  hereditaments  and  appurtenances  thereunto  belong- 
ing or  in  anywise  thereunto  appertaining  To  have  and  to  hold  the  said 
eighty  acres  with  the  allowance  and  the  said  twenty  acres  of  land  with  the 
hereditaments  and  appurtenances  thereunto  belonging  unto  my  said  Son 
Abraham  Stout  his  heirs  and  assigns  forever  under  this  express  limitation 
for  the  sum  of  thirteen  hundred  pounds  lawful  money  of  Pennsylvania 
in  good  silver  coin  from  which  said  sum  he  shall  deduct  the  sum  five 
hundred  and  fifty  pounds  as  his  full  share  of  and  from  all  my  real  estate 
and  Lands  and  that  my  said  Son  Abraham  Stout  his  heirs  and  assigns 
well  and  truly  pay  or  cause  to  be  paid  the  remaining  sum  of  seven  hun- 
dred and  fifty  pounds  without  any  deduction  in  the  following  manner  that 
is  to  say  in  ten  equal  yearly  payments  the  first  payment  thereof  at  the  end 
of  one  year  after  my  decease  and  allow  his  sister  Hannah  to  have  liberty 
of  the  use  of  the  western  room  as  herein  before  mentioned    Item  I  give 
and  devise  unto  my  son  Jacob  Stout  all  the  remaining  part  of  my  Planta- 
tion on  which  I  dwell  bounded  by  the  land  herein  before  devised  unto  my 
son  Abraham  Stout  and  Land  of  John  Groff  the  School  house  Lot  Land 
of  Henry  Nunnemaker  Adam  Kern  Abraham  Souffer  Philip  Reeser  and 
the  north  east  Branch  of  Perquiomey  Creek  Containing  one  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  and  allowance  for  roads  (be  it  more  or  less)  and  also  an- 
other tract  or  piece  of  land  likewise  situate  in  the  township  of  Rockhill 
bounded  by  lands  of  Abraham  Vanholt  Henry  Groff  the  College  Land 
and  the  three  Mile  run  Containing  twenty  eight  acres  and  sixty  perches 
together  with  the  Buildings  hereditaments  and  appurtenances  thereunto 
belonging  or  in  anywise  thereunto  appertaining  To  have  and  to  hold  the 
said  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  and  allowance  and  the  said  twenty 
eight  acres  and  sixty  perches  of  land  with  the  hereditaments  and  appurte- 
nances thereunto  belonging  unto  my  said  Son  Jacob  Stout  his  heirs  and 
Assigns  forever  and  this  express  limitation  for  the  sum  of  twenty  one 
hundred  pounds  lawful  money  of  Pennsylvania  in  good  silver  Coin  from 


214  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

which  said  sum  of  twenty  one  hundred  Pounds  he  shall  deduct  the  sum 
of  six  hundred  pounds  as  his  full  share  of  and  from  all  my  lands  and  real 
estate  and  my  said  son  Jacob  Stout  his  heirs  or  assigns  pay  or  cause  to 
be  well  and  truly  paid  the  remaining  sum  of  fifteen  hundred  pounds  in  the 
following  manner  that  is  to  say  the  sum  of  one  hundred  and  seventy  five 
pounds  a  part  thereof  at  the  end  of  one  year  after  my  decease  and  the 
same  sum  of  money  at  the  end  of  every  following  year  except  the  last 
payment  thereof  which  is  only  one  hundred  pounds  until  the  sum  of  fif- 
teen hundred  Pounds  is  fully  paid  which  aforesaid  sums  of  seven  hun- 
dred and  fifty  pounds  and  fifteen  hundred  pounds  of  money  which  my 
said  Sons  Abraham  Stout  and  Jacob  Stout  their  heirs  or  Assigns  are 
herein  before  ordered  to  pay  for  the  lands  devised  unto  them  I  give  and 
order  to  be  equally  divided  to  and  between  my  Son  Henry  H.  Stout  and 
my  Daughters  Anne  Margaret  Hannah  and  Magdalena  or  their  lawful 
representatives  in  equal  shares  as  the  same  becomes  due  as  herein  before 
mentioned  and  specified  And  Whereas  my  son  Henry  H.  Stout  is  indebted 
to  me  in  and  by  three  Bonds  and  a  Bill  in  the  sum  of  two  hundred  and 
seventy  five  pounds  (besides  other  money  and  Goods  he  received  of  me 
towards  his  portion  which  I  have  entered  in  a  Book)  my  will  is  that  he 
shall  not  be  charged  more  than  four  per  cent  interest  p''  year  on  said  debt 
and  for  one  year  more  after  my  decease  and  further  is  my  Will  that  the 
aforesaid  debt  and  all  the  value  of  the  money  goods  and  Chattels  entered 
in  said  Book  and  all  the  remaining  part  of  my  personal  estate  not  herein 
before  mentioned  to  be  be  given  and  bequeathed  shall  be  equally  divided 
between  my  Sons  Jacob  Henry  and  Abraham  and  my  Daughters  Anne 
Margaret  Hannah  and  Magdalena  or  their  lawful  representatives  share 
and  share  alike  and  also  is  my  Will  that  my  son  Jacob  shall  have  liberty 
to  haul  his  hay  from  his  lower  meadow  along  the  middle  fence  where  the 
road  now  is  provided  that  he  always  keeps  a  good  gate  at  the  upper  end 
and  further  is  my  Will  that  my  said  Sons  Jacob  and  Abraham  shall  enjoy 
the  common  use  of  the  wash  house  and  of  the  ditches  where  they  now  are 
for  watering  meadows  provided  each  of  them  doth  an  equal  share  to  the 
keeping  of  said  wash  house  and  ditches  in  repair  and  as  surviving  trus- 
tee of  the  Union  School  house  and  Lot  of  land  thereunto  belonging  I  do 
appoint  my  son  Jacob  Stout  to  be  trustee  thereof  in  my  room  and  stead 
and  I  give  unto  my  son  Abraham  Stout  my  share  in  the  Richland  Library 
and  lastly  I  do  hereby  nominate  and  appoint  my  sons  Jacob  Stout  and 
Abraham  Stout  Executors  of  this  my  last  Will  and  Testament  and  allow 
unto  them  reasonable  compensation  and  no  more  for  their  trouble.     In 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  215 

Witness  whereof  I  the  said  Abraham  Stout  to  this  my  last  Will  and  Tes- 
tament have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and  Seal  the  day  and  year  first  above 
written.^ 

Signed   Sealed   published   and  /j  M  0  A>         _p 

declared  by  the  said  Testator  v>-X>7A  RCL/)^v\   U^Cr\P^ 

to  be  his  last  Will  and  Testa-  ^ 

ment  in  the  presence  of  us 

Sam'.  Sellers 

Henry  Schlicter 

This  will  was  entered  for  probate  July  12,  1812,  Letters  Tes- 
tamentary being  issued  to  Jacob  Stout  and  Abraham  Stout,  Junior, 
the  two  sons  named  by  their  father  to  be  executors.  An  inventory 
of  all  the  goods  and  chattels  of  the  deceased  had  been  made  by 
these  two  sons  on  the  5th  and  6th  of  July,  the  valuation  of  the 
whole  estate  being  estimated  at  $6607.84.  This  inventory  was 
submitted  to  the  Court  when  the  will  was  admitted  for  probate, 
July  12th  following. 

Inventory 

An  Inventory  of  the  Goods  &  Chattels  of  Ab™  Stout  of  Rockhill  in 
the  County  of  Bucks  Deceased,  Taken  by  Jacob  Stout  and  Ab™  Stout 
Executors  of  the  last  Will  &  Testament  of  said  deceased  and  appraised 
by  the  Subscribers  on  the  6th  &  7th  days  of  July  A.  D.  One  Thousand 
Eight  Hundred  &  Twelve.^ 
Imprimis 

In  Cash  Gold  &  silver $732  65 

The  Deceased's  Wearing  Apparel 84  10 

His  riding  Horse  Saddle  &  Brick 60  00 

To  Four  Cows  &  2  Heiffers  82.00  to  9  Sheep  at  1.50—13.50.  . .  95  50 
To   four   Swine    16.00    To   7    Shoats    10.50   to    12>4    bs.   of 

Rye  8.76. .         35  26 
To  53^   bushels  of   Buckwheat  3.68  To   I3/2   acre  of   Wheat 

15.00.  .         18  68 

To  the  third  of  4>4  acres  of  wheat 30  00 

To  the  third  of  12  acres  of  Rye 28  00 

To  the  third  of  Ten  acres  of  Indian  Corn 25  00 


1  Will  Book  No.  8,  p.  280.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Original  papers,  in  office  of  Register  of  Wills,  Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


216  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

To  Ya  acre  of  Potatoes  6.00  To  2>^  acres  of  oats  10.00 16  00 

To  one  Quarter  &  a  half  of  Flax  5.00  To  one  acre  Corn  8.00.         13  00 
To  a  Sldgh  3.00  To  a  Windless  5.00  To  old  Waggon  Hoops 

4.00..         12  00 
To  Hogshead  &  Barrels  3.00     To   Mawl   Wedges   &  augers 

2.00.  . 

To  5  Saws  1.50  To  3  addses,  3  axes  &  a  Broad  ax  5.00 

To  a  Chopper,  two  Picks  &  3  Sieves 

To  old   Iron   5.00  to  a   Soap   Cask   &   Soap   .75   to   Cabbage 

knife  .25.  . 

To  a  Salt  Tub  &  Salt  3.50  to  4  Planes  .50  to  3  Sieves  .25 

To  a  small  chair  &  two  gallon  Cask  0.75  to  Bricks  .50 

To  12  bushels  of  lime  3.00  to  14  Beehives  1.50 

To  a  Cheese  Hoop  &  Screw  .50  To  a  tub  &c  50 

To  two  Baskets  50  To  2  old  Saddles  50  to  small  chair  25 

To  a  Copper  Kettle  5.00  To  2  Iron  dittoes  4.00  to  3  Tubs 

5.00.  . 

To  a  Potrack  watering  Pot  &  2  spades  1.50  to  18  Bages  4.50 

To  a  p*"  of  Gears  3.00  to  Plough  irons  &  surngletrees  2.00.  .  .  . 
To  a   Potters  mill    1.00  to  Tubs  2.00  to   Half   hogshead   &c 

1.50..  4  50 

To  Six  plank  &  lath  1.25  To  2  dung  forks  hayfork  &  drag 

2.00..  3  25 

To  7  weeding  hoes  2.50  Grubbing  hoe  1.50  Crow  Bar  2.00.  ...  6  00 

To  3  rakes  .50  to  11  Cow  Chains  4.00  to  5  flower  Casks  .75.  .  5  25 

To  Cutting  Box  5.00  To  2  Rat  Traps  50  Corn  Harrow  1.50.  .  7  00 

To  Wheel  Barrow  1.00  to  a  Chopper  25  to  3  sythes  &  ladder 

50..  1  75 

To  a   Copper   Kettle  8.00   Cotton   wheel    1.00   to   3   spinning 

wheels  3.00.  .         12  00 
To  a  Cradle  25  to  2  Dough  Troughs   1.00  to  6  Bread   Bas- 
kets 0.60.  .  1  85 
To  Sleigh  runners  1.50  to  5>4  lb  Cown  Wool  1.65  &  20  lb. 

fine  do.  .         13  15 
$1262  69 


5  00 

6  50 

3  00 

6  00 

4  25 

1  25 

4  50 

1  00 

1  25 

14  00 

6  00 

5  00 

BROUGHT  OVER  $1262    69 

To  600wt  of  Rye  Flour  12.00  to  41  lb  of  Tow  yarn  6.00. ...         18 

To  7  Baskets  2.50  to  2  Butter  Boxes  3.00  a  Lot  of  tow  .75 6  25 

To  75  lb  of  soap  6.50  to  a  half  peck  &c  60  to  Hetchels  3.00.  ...         10 
To  a  woman  Saddle  7.00  Feathers  10.00  a  Bridle  .75 17  75 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  217 

To  Saddle  Bags  1.00  To  25  old  Bags  5.00  to  11  do  5.00 11  00 

To  2  Sickles  25  To  dried  Beaf  &  Pork 4  00 

To  a  map  of  Pennsylvania  3.50  a  Gun  3.00  Bed  &  bedstead 

12.0..  18  50 
To  2  Chests  2.00  to  2  boxes  1.25  to  Hopps  4.00  dried  Cherries 

&c4..  11  25 

To  a  Chest  of  Drawers  3.00  a  Chest  2.00  a  Bridle  50 5  50 

To  a  Whimble  stock  pincers  2.00  a  Cupboard  .50 2  50 

To  a  Potrack  50  Shovel  &  Tongs  2.00  Bakeplate  1.00  Table 

50. .  4  00 

To  a  Clock  &  Case  32.00  Table  75 32  75 

To  a  poplar  table  50  Dresser  16.00 16  50 

To  a  Ten  plate  Stove  20  Bed  &  Bedstead  16 36  00 

To  Looking  glasses  2.00  to  9  Chairs  4.50  shovel  &  tongs  2.00.  .  8  50 

To  a  Churn  3.00  to  2  Barrels  2.00  to  4  &  funnel  5.00 10  00 

To  a  fish  tub  75  to  2  tubs  of  Lard  18.00  Molasses  Keg  50. . . .  19  25 

To  tallow  2.00  to  2  Baskets  60  Nine  bushel  potatoes  3.00 5  60 

To  a  frying  pan  &  skillet  2.00  to  Coffee  Roaster  &c  1.50 3  50 

To  a  p'"  of  Bellows  &  Chopper  75  to  4  Candlesticks  &  lamps 

1.25..  2  00 

To  a  smoothing  Iron  50.  Coffee  pots  &  tin  ware  2.00 2  50 

To  6  Tin  cups  75.  Coffee  mills  1.00 1  75 

To  a  Japan  coffee  pot  tea  canister  &c  1.75 1  75 

To  Butter  scales  &  weights  1.00  Earthen  ware  1.00 2  00 

To  5  Buckets  2.25  Tea  Kettle  &  Brass  dipper  4.00 6  25 

To  2  Iron  kettles  4.50  To  2  do  2.00  to  5  do  4.00 10  50 

To  Pewter  ware  26.00  to  2  silver  spoons  1.50  Skimmers  2.50. . .  30  00 

To  Crockery  2.00  a  Pair  of  Stilliards  2.25 4  25 

To  China  &  glass  ware  8.00  to  Bottles  .75 8  75 

To  a  Sawset  &  screw  75  a  Case  of  Instruments  2.00 2  75 

To  shaving  instruments  50  Gold  scale  &  weights  50 1  00 

To  Spectacles  &  Cases  75  a  p""  of  Compasses  50 1  25 

To  a  Hone  &  oilstove  75  Money  Purse  50 1  25 

To  lSy2  yds  of  tow  linnen  4.00  to  35  yds.  do:  12.95 16  95 

To  25  yd  of  flaxen  linnen  at  67  cts  pr.  yd 16  75 

To  42  do  28.14  To  327  do  of  tow  12.80  to  5  yd  do  1.50 42  44 

To  13  yd  of  tow  stripe  5.20  to  9  yds  of  tow  check  4.50  6}4 

yds  fine  do  4.87.  .  14  57 

$1756  35 


218  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


BROUGHT  OVER  $1756    35 

To  Bedticking  6.00  To  4  yd  of  tow  stripe   1.48  to  23^  yds 

of  linnen  1.67.  .  9  15 

To  136  yds  of  flaxen  linnen  at  67  cents  pr.  yd 91  45 

To  a  Wool  wheel  &  reel  2.50  To  a  desk  10.00 12  50 

To  a  Powder  Horn  &  punch  25  To  344  lbs  of  smoked  meat     . .  27  52 

To  a  Chest  1.00  To  15  bushels  Corn  10.00 11  00 

To  Indigo  1.50  To  35  yds  of  linnen 23  45 

To  6}i  yds  of  woolen  Cloth  9.50  To  9  diaper  Cloths  13.00 22  50 

To  23  table  Cloths  23.00  To  4  Check  bed  cases  8.00  To  8 

pillow  cases  6.00.  .  37  00 
To  14  do  3.50  To  10  sheets  7.50  to  5  bed  cases  6.00  to  8  fine 

sheets  14.00.  .  31  00 
To  3  bed  cases  &  2  sheets  4.50  To  15  bolsters  3.75  To  9  vol- 

lets  2.00. .  10  25 

To  27  Towels  &  1  sheet  4.37  To  2  remnants  of  stripe  2.25 6  62 

To  Bed  Curtains  5.00  to  3  lb  of  thread  2.50  To  8  lb  of  yarn 

4.00..  11  50 
To  1  yd  of  Bedticking  60  To  6  lbs  of  Cotton  67  to  4  old 

bags  50. .  1  77 
To  blank  Bonds   &   Parchment   2.50   Cradle   75   to   3   boxes 

1.12>^..  4  37 

To  Book  debts 48  91 

To  Jacob  Hartman  as  pr  Book 269  76 

Jacob  Stout                       Do 158  00 

Henry  Stout                     Do 414  67 

Hannah  Worman              Do 276  20 

Tobias  Rool                      Do 260  30 

John  Gerhart                     Do 281  58 

Due  &  to  become  Due  on  Bonds  Notes  or  obligations 2354  44 

Interest  due  on  said  Bonds  &  Notes 435  36 

Books  in  German  &  English  Languages 32  44 

To  Walnut   Boards  &   Scantling 7  50 

To  Flax  12.00  To  a  Plane  25 12  25 


Total  sum     $6607  84 
Specified  Legacies  given  by  the  Will 
To  his   Son  Ab™  Horse  Saddle  &  Bridle   100.00  Cow  20.00 

three  sheep  4.50.  .        124  50 
To  3  swine  15.00  Bed  &  Bedstead   12.00  Walnut  table  5.00 

milk  Shelve  4..         36  00 


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Permanent   commission  given  by   President  Theodore   Roosevelt   to   Ensign 
Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger,  of  the  United  States  Navy,  Feb.  19,  1908. 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  219 

To  a  Ten  plate  Stove  &  pipe  20.00  Bed  &c  40.00  Chest  3.00.  . .  63  00 

To  a  Kitchen  Dresser  4.00  in  Cash  60.00 64  00 

To   his    Daughter    Hannah    Worman    flax   linnen    30   yds    at 

67  cts..  20  10 

Do  one  third  of  his  flax  6.00  Do  75  lbs  of  Soap  6.50 12  50 

Do  6  Bushels  of  Rye  4.38  Two  Bushels  of  wheat  3 7  38 

Do  Walnut  Table  2.50 2  50 

Pr.  us  Benj.  Rosenberger 

Henry  Cope 

Affirmed  before  the  Subscriber  One  of  the  Justices  of  the  Peace 
for  the  County  of  Bucks  this  Twelfth  day  of  July  A.  D.  1812 

Andrew  Schlichter 

Some  days  later,  the  date  not  being  recorded,  the  executors 
filed  an  account  showing  that  the  inventory  made  had  not  included 
the  specified  legacies,  which  amounted  to  $329.98,  and  this  sum, 
with  the  addition  of  $211.98,  which  had  been  raised  from  the  sale 
of  certain  goods  and  effects,  brought  the  total  amount  of  the  estate 
up  to  $7149.80,  a  sum  which  in  those  days  entitled  Abraham  Stout 
to  be  considered  a  man  of  comparative  wealth. 

The  accompts  of  Jacob  Stout  and  Abraham  Stout  Executors  of  The 
last  Will  and  Testament  of  Abraham  Stout  late  of  Rockhill  Township 
in  the  County  of  Bucks  deceased.^ 
Dr  the  Estate  of  said  Ab"*  Stout  to  the  Executors 

To  Cash  paid  Register  for  proving  the  Will $  8  78 

To  do  for  Funeral  expences 37  64 

To  do  Christian  Fretz  as              pr  receipt  No     1 3  30 

To  do  C.  Vanhorn                         pr      do      No     2 0  50 

To  do  Charles  Hinkle                  pr      do      No     3 2  75 

To  do  Asher  Miner                      pr      do      No    4 1  75 

To  do  Nathaniel  Shewel               pr      do      No     5 1  87 

To  do  Abraham  Benner               pr      do      No     6 8  00 

To  do  Isaac   Berger                      pr      do      No     7   1  93 

To  do  Peter  Berndt                      pr      do      No     8 9  69 


1  Original  papers,  office  of   Register  of  Wills,  Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


220  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

To  do  Sam'    Sellers                      pr      do      No     9 8  22 

To  do  Benjamin  Rosenberger     pr      do      No  10 2  00 

To  do  Henry  Schlichter               pr      do      Noll 2  00 

To  do  Saml     Sellers                     pr      do      No  12 4  00 

To  do  Andrew  Schlichter             pr      do      No  13 2  00 

To  do  Henry  Cope                       pr      do      No  14 9  00 

To  do  Jacob  Senn                         pr      do      No  15 6  25 

To  do  Hannah  Worman              pr      do      No  16 12  00 

To  Cash  pd  Edward  Thompson  pr  receipt 13  72 

By  Specific  legacies  to  the  Legatees 329  98 

Commissions  allowed  for  Completing  the  trust 80  00 

Fees  to  Register  Clk  Orphans  Court  Advtsg  for  copy  furnished 

to  Exe"  &c 10  09 

555  47 
Balance  remaining  in  hands  of  Exe  rs  disposed  of  as  the  will 

directs 6594  33 

$7149  80 

Contra  Cr 

By  am'  of  Inventory  specified  Legacies  excepted $6607  84 

By  advance  in  the  Sale  of  the  Goods 211  98 

Total  Sum  except  the  specified  Legacies. $6819  82 

Specified    Legacies    p""    Inventory $  329  98 

Total  Sum $7149  80 


Both  Abraham  Stout  and  his  wife,  Mary  Magdalena  Hartzell, 
are  buried  in  the  Stout  private  burial  ground,  at  Perkasie.  The 
inscriptions  on  the  gravestones  record: 

In  In 

Memory  of  Memory  of 

ABRAHAM  STOUT  MAGDALENA  STOUT 

was  born  August  17*^^  who  died  the  8'^^  of 

1740  and  departed  November  1811 

This  life  June  8'M812  Aged  60  Years 

Aged  71  years  9  months  and  6  Months 
and  3  weeks. 


Abraham   Stout, 
Born  Aug,  17,  1740. 
Died    June    S,    1812. 


Magdalena   Hartzell   Stout, 
Born   May  S,    1751. 
Died  Nov.  8,  1811. 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  221 

Children  of  Abraham  Stout  and  Mary  Magdalena  Hartsell: 

1.  Anna    (Nancy)    Stout,   born    1773,  was  confirmed   as  an  adult 

October  18,  1788,  sponsor  was  Elizabeth  Kern,  a  single 
person;  married  April  2,  1793,  Jacob  Hartman,  of  Friedens- 
ville,  Lehigh  County,  Pennsylvania. 

2.  Jacob  Stout,  born  November  27,  1775;  died  August  20,  1820; 

married  Elizabeth  Barndt. 

3.  HENRY    HARTZELL    STOUT,    born    June    3,    1776;    died 

January  1,  1854;  married  May  8,  1798,  ELIZABETH 
KERN,  born  May  10,  1778;  died  June  5,  1871. 

4.  Margaretta  Stout,  born   1779;  confirmed   1795,  aged   15  years; 

married  Tobias  Ruhl ;  resided  near  Bridgeton,  Pennsylvania. 

5.  Abraham  Stout,  born  1787;  married  Magdalena  . 

6.  Mary  Magdalena   Stout,   born   1790;   confirmed    1805,  aged    15 

years ;  married  John  Gerhart  of  Telford. 

7.  Hannah  Stout,  married  (1st)  Mr.  Worman;  (2d)  Jacob  Stouver. 

HENRY  HARTZELL  STOUT,  second  son  of  Abraham 
Stout  and  his  wife,  Magdalena  Hartzell,  was  born  on  the  home- 
stead farm  at  Perkasie,  Bucks  County,  Pa.,  June  3,  1776.  He 
married.  May  8,  1798,  Elizabeth  Kern,  daughter  of  John  Adam 
and  Anna  Maria  Kern,  of  Hilltown  Township.  She  was  born 
May  10,  1778,  and  died  June  5,  1871.  Henry  H.  Stout  resided  for 
some  years  after  attaining  manhood  on  a  portion  of  the  old  home- 
stead near  Perkasie,  but  eventually  removed  to  Hilltown  Township, 
where  he  passed  the  remainder  of  his  days.  His  father,  in  his  will, 
bequeathed  to  him  a  tract  of  land  on  Bush  Run  in  Center  County, 
Pennsylvania,  which  Abraham  had  acquired  some  years  earlier, 
when  that  section  was  part  of  Northumberland  County. 

The  year  following  his  death  all  of  the  children  of  Abraham 
Stout  quit-claimed  to  their  brother,  Jacob,  all  of  their  right  to 
certain  lands  which  had  belonged  to  their  father. 

Deed  :  Henry  H.  Stout  et  al  to  Jacob  Stout,  1813 

Ci)i0  Kn Denture  Made  the  Ninth  day  of  June  in  the  Year  of  Our 
Lord  One  thousand  Eight  hundred  and  Thirteen  Between  Henry  H.  Stout 
of  Hilltown  Township  in  the  County  of  Bucks  and  State  of  Pennsylvania 
and  Elizabeth  his  wife  Abraham  Stout  of  Rockhill  Township  in  said 
County  of  Bucks  and  Magdalena  his  wife  Jacob  Hartman  of  Saucon 


222  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Township  in  the  County  of  Lehigh  and  State  aforesaid  and  Ann  his  wife 
Tobias  Ruhl  and  Margaret  his  wife  and  Hannah  Workman  of  said  Town- 
ship of  Rockhill  and  John  Gerhard  of  Franconia  Township  in  the  County 
of  Montgomery  and  Magdalena  his  wife  all  of  the  one  part  they  the  said 
Henry  Stout  Abraham  Stout  Ann  Hartman  Margaret  Ruhl  and  Magda- 
lena Gerhart  parties  above  named  of  the  first  part  and  the  above  named 
Jacob  Stout  of  the  second  part  being  all  of  them  the  sons  and  daughters 
of  Abraham  Stout  Esq*"  late  of  said  Rockhill  Township  aforesaid  deceased 
and  whereas  the  said  Abraham  Stout  Esq"^  deceased  by  force  and  virtue 
of  sundry  good  Conveyances  in  the  Law  duly  had  made  and  executed  was 
in  his  life  time  and  at  the  time  of  his  decease  lawfully  seized  in  his  de- 
mesne as  of  fee  of  and  in  sundry  tracts  of  land  situate  in  said  township 
of  Rockhill  and  being  thereof  so  seized  as  aforesaid  by  his  last  Will  & 
Testament  in  writing  bearing  date  the  4'^  day  of  May  Anno  Domino  1812 
gave  and  bequeathed  unto  his  son  the  above  named  Jacob  Stout  two  cer- 
tain tracts  or  parcels  of  land  situate  in  Rockhill  township  aforesaid,  one 
of  them  containing  120  acres  more  or  less  and  the  other  containing  28 
acres  and  60  perches  they  being  part  of  the  several  above  recited  tracts 
(under  the  express  limitation  that  the  said  Jacob  Stout  shall  pay  the  sum 
of  sixteen  hundred  pounds  lawful  money  of  Pennsylvania  unto  the  said 
Henry  H.  Stout  and  his  sisters  above  named  as  in  and  by  the  said  last  Will 
and  Testament  may  appear)— NOW  THIS  INDENTURE  WITNESS- 
ETH that  the  said  Henry  Stout  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  Jacob  Hartman 
and  Ann  his  wife  Tobias  Ruhl  and  Margaret  his  wife  Hannah  Worman 
and  John  Gerhart  and  Magdalena  his  wife  as  well  as  for  the  consideration 
of  £1600  money  aforesaid  to  them  in  hand  well  and  truly  paid  by  the 
said  Jacob  Stout*'''******each  and  every  one  of  them  hath  remised,  re- 
leased and  do  forever  quitclaim  unto  the  said  Jacob  Stout  and  his  heirs 
and  assigns  All  the  Estate  and  Estates,  dividend  or  dividends,  rights,  title, 
property  claim,  ********  of  in  to  or  out  of  those  two  above  recited  tracts 
or  parcels  of  land  situated  in  Roclhill  township  aforesaid  bounded  by  the 
north  east  branch  of  Perquiomy  Creek  and  where  the  old  Swamp  Road 
intersects  the  said  Creek,  adjoining  land  of  said  Abraham  Stout  and  land 
of  Henry  Nunnemacker,  Henry  Trumbour  Jun*"  Adam  Kern,  Abraham 
Stoufifer  and  Philip  Reeser  containing  120  acres  (it  being  part  of  a  tract 
of  200  acres  which  Isaac  Stout  and  Barbara  his  wife,  Gabriel  Schwartz- 
lander  and  Solyma  his  wife  and  Jacob  Schleiffer  and  Catherine  his  wife 
by  an  Indenture  dated  January  12,  1783  (Deed  Book  G.  Vol.  2,  p.  67) 
released  unto  the  said  Abraham  Stout  Esq.  deceased  which  said  200  acres 
is  one  of  those  tracts  of  which  he  died  seized.  The  other  the  smaller  tract 
is  bounded  by  lands  of  Abraham  Vanholt,  Henry  Groff  and  the  College 
land  and  three  mile  run,  containing  28  acres  and  60  perches  being  all  and 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  223 

the  same  tract  of  land  which  Gabriel  Seager  and  Margaret  his  wife  by 
deed  December  24,  1772  (E.  Vol.  3,  p.  82)  granted  and  confirmed  unto 
said  Abraham  Stout  **********  In  witness  whereof  the  said  parties  to 
these  presents  have  set  their  hands  and  seals.^ 

Tobias  Ruhl  Henry  H.  Stout 

Margaret  Ruhl  Elizabeth  Stout 

Hannah  Workman  Abraham  Stout 

John  Gerhart  Magdalena  Stout 

Magdalena  Gerhart  Ann  Hartman 

Jacob  Hartman 

On  May  17,  1800,  John  Adam  Kern  and  wife,  Anna  Maria, 
of  Hilltown  Township,  conveyed  to  Henry  H.  Stout  and  wife, 
Elizabeth,  who  was  their  daughter,  two  tracts  of  land,  part  of  the 
original  Kern  plantation,  including  the  homestead  of  John  Adam 
Kern,  which  John  Adam  had  some  years  earlier  purchased  of  his 
father  and  mother,  Christian  and  Anna  Maria  Kern.' 

Deed:  John  Adam  Kern  to  Henry  H.  Stout,  1800 

Cl)i0  SnDentUtC  Made  the  Twenty  Seventh  Day  of  May  in  the 
Year  of  our  Lord  One  Thousand  and  Eight  Hundred  BETWEEN  John 
Adam  Kern  of  the  Township  of  Hilltown  in  the  County  of  Bucks  and 
Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania  Yeoman  and  Mary  his  Wife  of  the  one 
part  AND  Henry  H.  Stout  of  the  Township  of  Hilltown  aforesaid  Sadler 
of  the  other  Part  WITNESSETH  that  the  said  John  Adam  Kern  and 
Mary  his  his  Wife  for  and  in  Consideration  of  the  Sum  of  Fifteen  Hun- 
dred and  Ten  Pounds  Lawful  Money  of  Pennsylvania  unto  them  well  and 
truly  in  Hand  paid  by  the  said  Henry  H.  Stout  at  and  before  the  Sealing 
and  Delivery  hereof  The  Receipt  whereof  the  said  John  Adam  Kern  and 
Mary  his  Wife  do  hereby  Acknowledge  and  thereof  Acquit  and  for  EVER 
Discharge  the  said  Henry  H.  Stout  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  by  these  pres- 
ents ;  HAVE  granted  Bargained  Sold  Conveyed  Released  and  Confirmed 
AND  by  these  presents  DO  Grant  Bargain  Sell  Convey  Release  and  Con- 
firm unto  the  said  Henry  H.  Stout  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  TWO  CON- 
TIGUOUS TRACTS  or  pieces  of  Land  Situate  lying  and  being  in  the 
Township  of  Hilltown  aforesaid  The  first  thereof  BEGINNING  at  a 
Stump  in  a  Line  of  the  hereinafter  described  Tract  of  Land  and  from 
thence  Extending  by  the  same  South  forty  eight  degrees  and  a  half  East 


1  Deed  Book  No.  43,  pp.  557,  560.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Original  Deed  in  possession  of  present  owner  of  property. 


224  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Sixty  seven  perches  and  four  tenths  of  a  perch  to  a  Stone,  North  Eighty 
three  degrees  and  a  half  East  twenty  four  perches  and  four  tenths  of  a 
perch  to  a  Stone  in  the  Saucon  Road  thence  along  the  same  South  five 
degrees  West  Twenty  one  perches  and  one  tenth  of  a  perch  to  a  stone 
thence  by  Land  of  Lawrence  Kraymer  South  Eighty  degrees  East  forty 
two  perches  and  three  tenths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone  and  North  forty  two 
degrees  and  a  half  East  forty  nine  perches  to  a  stone  thence  by  other  Land 
of  the  said  John  Adam  Kern  North  thirty  one  degrees  and  a  half  West 
fifty  perches  and  eight  tenths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone,  South  Eighty  two  de- 
grees West  thirty  eight  perches  and  one  tenth  of  a  perch  to  a  stone  in  the 
Saucon  Road  thence  along  the  same  North  two  degrees  West  twenty  eight 
perches  to  a  stone  and  North  twenty  two  degrees  and  a  half  West  thirty 
four  perches  to  a  Stone  and  South  fifty-nine  degrees  West  still  Continu- 
ing by  the  said  John  Adam  Kerns  Land  Seventeen  perches  one  and  eight 
tenths  of  a  perch  to  a  Stone  thence  by  Land  belonging  to  the  Heirs  of 
Philip  Kern  deceased  South  Seventeen  degrees  East  forty  six  perches  and 
and  four  tenths  of  a  perch  to  a  marked  White  Oak  and  Crossing  Morris 
Run  South  Eighty  degrees  and  a  quarter  West  Sixty  Seven  perches  to  the 
place  of  Beginning  Containing  Fifty  Acres  |  Being  ^  part  of  Two  Tracts 
of  Land  Containing  Together  One  Hundred  and  Eleven  acres  and  One 
Hundred  and  fifty  four  perches  of  Land  Which  Christian  Kern  and  Mary 
his  wife  by  Indenture  dated  the  Twentieth  day  of  June  in  the  Year  One 
thousand  Seven  hundred  and  Eighty  One  Did  Grant  Release  and  Confirm 
unto  the  said  John  Adam  Kern  in  ffee  as  by  the  said  Indenture  Recorded 
in  the  Rolls  Office  for  the  County  of  Bucks  in  Deed  Book  No.  28,  page 
167  may  more  fully  Appear  |  AND  the  other  Tract  or  piece  of  Land  Be- 
ginning at  a  post  in  a  Line  of  Hubert  Cassels  Land  and  from  thence  Ex- 
tending by  the  same  and  by  Land  of  Christian  Fluke  South  forty  three 
degrees  West  One  Hundred  and  Thirty  perches  to  a  Stone  thence  by  Land 
of  Valentine  Kraymer  South  forty  eight  degrees  East  Sixty  two  perches 
to  a  Black  Oak  thence  by  Land  of  Christian  Kern  North  forty  seven  de- 
grees and  a  half  West  twenty  Nine  perches  and  six  tenths  of  a  perch  to  a 
Black  Oak  and  South  forty  eight  degrees  East  One  Hundred  and  Nine 
perches  to  a  White  Oak  by  the  side  of  Saucon  Road  thence  along  the  same 
by  Land  of  Lawrence  Kraymer  and  the  above  described  Tract  North  Six 
degrees  East  One  Hundred  and  forty  eight  perches  and  a  half  to  a  stone 
thence  by  the  first  above  described  Tract  of  Land  South  Eighty  four  de- 
grees West  Twenty  four  perches  and  three  tenths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone  and 
by  the  same  and  by  Land  belonging  to  the  Heirs  of  Philip  Kern  deceased 
North  forty  eight  Degrees  West  Eighty  perches  to  the  place  of  Beginning 
Containing  One  Hundred  and  One  Acres  and  Seventy  perches  |  Being  the 
same  Tract  of  Land  which  Christian  Kern  and  Mary  his  Wife  by  Inden- 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  225 

ture  Dated  the  twenty  Sixth  day  of  May  in  the  Year  of  our  Lord  One 
Thousand  Seven  Hundred  and  Ninety  five  Did  Grant  Convey  Release  and 
Confirm  unto  the  said  (John)  Adam  Kern  in  ffee  as  by  the  said  Indenture 
Recorded  in  the  Rolls  Office  for  the  County  of  Bucks  in  Deed  Book  No. 
28,  page  168  May  more  fully  appear  |  TOGETHER  also  with  all  and 
Singular  the  Buildings  Ways  Woods  Waters  Water  Courses  Rights  Lib- 
erties priviledges  Improvements  Hereditaments  and  Appurtenances 
Whatsoever  unto  the  said  described  Two  Tracts  or  pieces  of  Land  belong- 
ing or  in  anywise  thereunto  Appertaining  And  the  Reversions  Remainders 
Rents  Issues  and  Profits  thereof  AND  all  the  Estate  Right  Title  Interest 
Use  Possession  Property  Claim  and  Demand  Whatsoever  of  them  the  said 
John  Adam  Kern  and  Mary  his  Wife  in  Law  and  Equity  of  in  or  to  the 
same  TO  HAVE  AND  TO  HOLD  the  said  described  Fifty  Acres  of  Land 
and  the  said  described  One  Hundred  and  one  Acres  and  Seventy  perches 
of  Land  Hereditaments  and  premises  hereby  granted  or  mentioned  so  to 
be  with  the  Appurtenances  and  ever  part  and  parcel  thereof  Unto  the  said 
Henry  H.  Stout  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  To  the  only  proper  USE  Benefit 
and  Behoof  of  him  the  said  Henry  H.  Stout  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  for 
EVER  AND  the  said  John  Adam  Kern  for  himself  and  his  Heirs  Execu- 
tors and  ^Administrators  Doth  hereby  Covenant  and  Grant  to  and  with  the 
said  Henry  H.  Stout  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  by  these  presents  That  he  the 
said  John  Adam  Kern  and  his  Heirs  the  said  described  Two  Tracts  or 
pieces  of  Land  Hereditaments  and  premises  hereby  Granted  or  mentioned 
so  to  be  with  the  Appurtenances  and  every  part  and  parcel  thereof  unto  the 
said  Henry  H.  Stout  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  Against  him  the  said  John 
Adam  Kern  and  his  Heirs  and  against  all  and  every  other  person  or  Per- 
sons Whomsoever  Lawfully  Claiming  or  to  Claim  by  from  or  Under  him 
Shall  and  will  WARRANT  and  for  EVER  Defend  by  these  presents.  IN 
WITNESS  Whereof  the  said  John  Adam  Kern  and  Mary  his  Wife 
HAVE  Set  their  Hands  and  Seals  hereunto  DATED  the  Day  and  Year 
First  Abovwritten. 

Adam  Kern 
Sealed  and  Delivered  her 

in  the  Presence  of  Mary  X  Kern 

William  McNeely  mark 

John  Echel 

Before  me  the  Subscriber  one  of  the  Justices  of  the  peace  in  and  for 
the  County  of  Bucks  Came  the  above  Named  Grantor  John  Adam  Kern 
and  Mary  his  Wife  and  Acknowledged  the  abovewritten  Indenture  to  be 
their  Act  and  Deed  and  desired  the  same  may  be  Recorded  according  to 
Law.     The  said  Mary  Voluntarily  thereunto  Consenting  she  being  of 


226  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Lawful  Age  and  apart  from  her  Husband  Examined  and  the  Contents 

thereof  first  made  Known  Unto  her. 

Witness  my  Hand  and  Seal  the  Seventeenth  Day  of  June  Anno  Domini 

1800. 

William  McNeely. 

It  was  here  that  Henry  H.  Stout  and  wife,  Elizabeth,  spent 
the  rest  of  their  days.  At  his  death  the  farm  passed  to  his  son, 
Enos  Stout,  who  lived  here  until  his  death.  A  few  years  ago  the 
house  took  fire  and  burned,  and  only  the  crumbling  walls  are  to 
be  seen  today.  The  barn,  however,  was  not  injured  and  is  as  strong 
and  substantial  as  the  day  it  was  built. 

Henry  H.  Stout  was  a  successful  farmer  and  soon  became  a 
man  of  prominence  and  influence  in  the  community.  He  and  his 
family  were  members  of  the  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  as  were 
also  his  father,  mother,  brothers  and  sisters. 

The  following  records  concerning  Henry  H.  Stout  and  wife, 
Elizabeth,  appear  upon  the  Tohickon  Church  records : 

"April  1795,  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Adam  Kern,  Jr.,  confirmed,  aged 
16  years. 

"1793  on  Sunday  after  Whitsunday  Henry  Staut  was  baptized  and 
confirmed  as  an  adult,  aged  16  and  son  of  Abraham  Staut. 

"Anna  Maria,  daughter  of  Henry  Staut  and  Elizabeth,  born  Novem- 
ber 9,  1800,  baptized  December  28.  Witnesses  Adam  Kern  and  wife  Anna 
Maria. 

"Samuel,  son  of  Henry  Staut  and  Elizabeth,  born  February  7,  1803, 
baptized  May  29.    Witnesses  Samuel  Seibel  and  EHz.  Fluck. 

"Magdalena,  daughter  of  Henry  Stout  and  Elizabeth,  born  July  5, 
1805,  baptized  October  6,    Witnesses  John  Fluck  and  Hanna  Stout. 

"Hannah,  daughter  of  Henry  Stout  and  Elizabeth,  born  december 
27,  1807,  baptized  April  17,  1808.    Witnesses,  Henry  Weisel  and  Eva. 

"Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Henry  Stout  and  Elizabeth,  born  September 
16,  1810,  baptized  May  5,  1811. 

"Enos,  son  of  Henry  Stout  and  Elizabeth,  born  April  17,  1813,  bap- 
tized July  11,  1813. 

"June  5,  1871.    Elizabeth  Stout,  aged  93  years,  26  days." 

On  the  marriage  record  we  find: 

"May  25,  1819,  Henry  Cressman  and  Mary  Stout. 
"January  23,  1825,  Phillip  Cressman  and  Magdalena  Stout. 
"May  1,  1825,  John  Stouver  and  Hannah  Stout. 


I- 

C     OJ 


H  ^ 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  227 

"September  13,  1829,  Abraham  Rouderbush  and  Elizabeth  Stout. 

"November  14,  1834,  Enos  Stout  and  Catherine  Kratz. 

"November  29,  1835,  David  Creamer  and  Lidya  Stout. 

"May  22,  1842,  Samuel  Stout  and  Eliza  Stoneback. 

"January  21,  1844,  Samuel  Stout  and  Rebecca  Nunnamacher."^ 

It  is  noticed  that  neither  the  baptism  nor  marriage  of  Cath- 
erine, the  eldest  daughter  of  Henry  and  Elizabeth  Stout  is  to  be 
found  on  the  Tohickon  records.  She  married  the  Rev.  John 
Andrew  Strassburger,  who  was  minister  of  the  church,  and  who 
baptized  all  of  their  children  and  performed  the  marriage  ceremony 
of  nearly  all  of  them. 

Henry  H.  Stout  died  January  1,  1854,  without  having  made 
a  will.  Letters  of  administration  were  granted  to  Enos  Stout,  his 
son,  and  Tobias  Fluck,  his  son-in-law,  Joseph  Detweiler  and 
Joseph  Weisel  acting  as  bondsmen.^ 

January  12,  1854. 

It^nOto  311  g^en  IBP  ^bt$C  Pte0ent$  That  we  Enos  Stout 
Tobias  Fluck,  Joseph  Detweiler,  Joseph  Weisel  are  held  and  firmly  bound 
unto  the  Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania  in  the  sum  of  Six  thousand 
Dollars  lawful  silver  Money  of  the  United  States  of  America  to  be  paid 
to  the  said  Commonwealth  for  the  use  thereof  ;  To  the  which  payment  well 
and  truly  to  be  made  we  bind  ourselves  for  and  in  the  whole,  our  and  each 
of  our  heirs  Executors  and  Administrators,  Jointly  and  severally,  firmly 
by  these  presents  Sealed  with  our  Seals  Dated  the  Twelfth  day  of  January 
in  the  Year  of  Our  Lord  1854. 

The  Condition  of  this  obligation  is  that  if  the  above  bounded  Enos 
Stout  &  Tobias  Fluck  Administrators  of  all  and  singular  the  goods  chat- 
tels and  credits  of  Henry  H.  Stout  late  of  the  Township  of  Hilltown  de- 
ceased do  make  or  cause  to  be  made  a  true  and  perfect  inventory  of  all  and 
singular  the  goods  chattels  and  credits  of  the  said  deceased  which  have 
come  or  shall  come  to  the  hands  possession  or  knowledge  of  them  the  said 
Enos  Stout  &  Tobias  Fluck, 

Enos  Stout 
Tobias  Fluck 
Joseph  Detweiler 
Joseph  Weisel 


1  Records  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Administration  Book  No.  7,  p.  88.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


228  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

The  administrators  sold  to  Phillip  Cressman,  another  son-in- 
law,  a  part  of  the  original  homestead  tract.  The  draft  of  the 
land  made  at  the  time  of  this  sale  shows  that  Reuben  Y.  Strass- 
burger,  son  of  Rev.  John  Andrew  Strassburger,  and  his  wife, 
Catherine  Stout,  owned  an  adjoining  farm.  A  copy  of  the  deed 
and  draft  follows: 

Deed:  Ends  Stout  et  al  to  Philip  Cressman,  1855 

C^I)i0  3lnD^ntUt0,  Alade  the  Second  day  of  April  in  the  year  of 
our  Lord  one  thousand  Eight  hundred  and  fifty  five  Between  Enos  Stout 
and  Tobias  Fluck  administrators  of  all  and  singular  the  goods  and  chat- 
tels, rights  and  credits  which  were  of  of  Henry  H.  Stout  late  of  the  Town- 
ship of  Hilltown,  county  of  Bucks  and  State  of  Pennsylvania  yeoman  who 
died  Intestate,  of  the  one  part,  and  Philip  Cressman  of  the  same  place 

of  the  other  part :  WHEREAS  the  said  Henry  H.  Stout 

in  his  lifetime  and  at  the  time  of  his  death,  was  lawfully  seized  in  his  de- 
mesne as  of  fee  of  and  in  a  certain  Messuage  Plantation  and  two  contigu- 
ous Tracts  or  parcels  of  Land  demoninated  No.  1.  and  No.  2,  situated  in 
the  Township  of  Hilltown  aforesaid;  No.  1.  Beginning  at  a  Stone  for  a 
corner  in  the  Philadelphia  and  Bethlehem  road,  thence  along  the  same  by 
lands  of  John  Fulmer  south  four  degrees  and  a  quarter  west  ninety  eight 
perches,  and  six  hundredths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone,  thence  by  land  of  R.  Y. 
Strassberger,  north  fifty  degrees  and  a  half  west,  ninety  three  perches  and 
six  hundredths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone,  thence  by  land  of  said  Enos  Stout, 
north  fifty  two  degrees  and  a  half  East,  forty  two  perches  and  two  hun- 
dredths of  a  perch  to  a  stone,  north  thirteen  degrees  west,  sixteen  perches 
and  thirty  two  hundredths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone,  north  seven  degrees  and 
a  half  East,  nineteen  perches  and  four  hundredths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone, 
north  Eleven  degrees  East,  twenty  two  perches  and  six  hundredths  of  a 
perch  to  a  stone.  North  seventy  five  degrees  and  a  quarter  East,  eight 
perches  and  nine  hundredths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone,  north  twenty  two  de- 
grees and  three  quarters  East,  twenty  one  perches  and  four  tenths  to  a 
stone  and  north  Eighty  three  degrees  and  a  quarter  east  thirty  two  perches 
and  twenty  eight  hundredths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone,  thence  by  land  of 
Joseph  D.  Hendricks,  north  Eighty  one  degrees  east,  thirty  nine  perches 
and  eight  hundredths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone,  and  south  thirty  three  degrees 
and  three  quarters  east,  fifty  two  perches,  and  two  hundredths  of  a  perch 
to  a  stone,  thence  by  land  of  John  Fulmer,  south  forty  degrees  and  a  half 
west,  forty  nine  perches  and  eight  hundredths  of  a  perch  to  a  stone,  and 
north  eighty  three  degrees  and  a  quarter  west,  forty  two  perches  to  the 
place  of  Beginning  Containing  Seventy  two  acres  and  one  hundred  and 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY  229 

eighteen  perches  of  Land   (It  being  parts  of  the  same  two  contiguous 
Tracts  or  pieces  of  Land  which  John  Adam  Kern  and  Mary  his  wife  by 
their  Indenture  bearing  date  the  twenty  seventh  day  of  May  A.  D.  1800 
for  the  consideration  thereinmentioned,  did  grant  and  confirm  unto  the 
said  Henry  H.  Stout  in  fee  as  in  and  by  said  Indenture  Recorded  in  the 
Rolls  Office,  for  the  county  of  Bucks  in  Deed  Book  No.  31,  Vol.  B,  page 
130  &c.  relation  being  thereunto  had  more  fully  at  large  appears.    AND 
BEING  THEREOF  SO   SEIZED  DIED  INTESTATE  after  whose 
death,  to  wit:  at  an  Orphans'  court  held  at  Doylestown  in  and  for  the 
county  of  Bucks  the  twenty  fourth  day  of  April  A.  D.  1854  Before  the 
Honorable  Daniel  M.  Snyder  Esqr.,  President,  and  his  Associates  Judges 
of  the  same  court  The  petition  of  Elizabeth  Stout  the  widow  and  all  the 
heirs  of  the  said  Henry  H.  Stout  deceased,  was  presented  and  read,  Pray- 
ing the  court  to  order  and  appoint  seven  men  by  them  mutually  chosen  to 
make  partition  or  valuation  of  the  said  premises.  Whereupon  the  said  court 
did  on  the  same  day  approve  and  confirm  said  nomination  and  appoint  the 
said  seven  men  to  make  partition  or  valuation  of  said  premises  and  on  the 
twelfth  day  of  June  following,  the  Jury  aforesaid  made  report,  which  was 
duly  confirmed  by  the  court  on  the  same  day  a  rule  was  granted  upon  all 
the  heirs  and  legal  representatives  of  said  deceased,  to  be  and  appear  at  the 
next  Orphans'  court  to  refuse  or  accept  said  Real  Estate  at  the  valuation 
returned  thereof,  or  shew  cause  if  any  they  have,  why  the  same  should  not 
be  sold  for  their  mutual  Benefit,  on  due  proof  of  the  service  of  the  rule 
and  the  publication  of  the  same,  on  the  Eleventh  day  of  September  1856, 
all  the  heirs  appeared  in  open  court,  and  severally  refused  to  accept  of 
Tract  No.  1  of  said  land  and  premises  at  the  valuation  returned  thereof, 
and  desired  that  the  same  might  be  sold,  Whereupon  the  court  granted  an 
order  of  sale,  to  the  Administrators  authorizing  them  to  sell  the  same  and 
on  the  second  day  of  november  1854  the  administrators  made  report  that 
in  pursuance  of  said  order  of  Court,  they  did  expose  to  public  sale  on  the 
seventeenth  day  of  October  1854,  said  Tract  No.  1,  first  giving  due  public 
and  timely  notice  of  the  time  and  place  of  sale  agreeably  to  the  said  order 
of  court,  and  sold  the  same  by  Public  vendue  or  outcry  to  Philip  Cress- 
man  for  fifty  two  dollars  per  acre  amounting  to  the  sum  of  three  thousand 
seven  hundred  and  eighty  two  dollars  and  thirty  five  cents,  he  being  the 
highest  bidder  and  that  the  highest  and  best  price  bidden  for  the  same ; 
which  sale  so  as  aforesaid  made  was,  on  said  second  day  of  november 
1854  duly  confirmed  by  the  Court,  and  decreed  that  the  same  be  and  re- 
main firm  and  stable  for  ever,  as  by  the  records  and  proceedings  of  the 
same  court  will  at  large  appear,  NOW  THIS  INDENTURE  WIT- 
NESSETH that  the  said  Enos  Stout  and  Tobias  Fluck  administrators 


230  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

aforesaid  for  and  in  consideration  of  three  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
Eighty  two  dollars  and  thirty  five  cents  Lawful  money  of  the  United 
States :  Twelve  hundred  and  sixty  dollars  and  seventy  Eight  cents  thereof 
to  remain  a  lien  upon  the  above  described  premises  during  the  natural  life 
of  Elizabeth  Stout  widow  and  relict  of  said  Henry  H.  Stout  Dc^.  the 
Interest  thereof  at  five  percent  per  annum  to  be  paid  to  her  or  to  her  order 
by  the  said  Philip  Cressman  his  heirs  or  assigns  on  the  first  days  of  April 
in  each  and  every  year  during  her  natural  life  and  at  her  decease,  the  said 
sum  of  Twelve  hundred  and  sixty  dollars  and  seventy  Eight  cents  to  the 
legal  heirs  and  representatives  of  said  Henry  H.  Stout  Deceased,  as  also 
the  Further  Sum  of  Twenty  five  hundred  and  twenty  one  dollars  and  fifty 
seven  cents  to  them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  Philip  Cressman  at  and  before 
the  sealing  and  delivery  hereof  the  receipt  whereof  they  do  hereby  ac- 
knowledge and  thereof  acquit  and  forever  discharge  the  said  Philip  Cress- 
man his  heirs,  executors,  and  administrators  by  these  presents,  have  grant- 
ed, bargained,  sold,  released  and  confirmed  and  by  these  presents  in  pur- 
suance and  by  virtue  of  the  said  order  of  court  Do  grant,  bargain,  sell, 
release  and  confirm  unto  the  said  Philip  Cressman  and  to  his  heirs  and 
assigns,  all  that  above  mentioned  and  described  Tract  of  land  and  premi- 
ses. Together  with  all  and  singular  the  Buildings  and  Improvements  ways, 
woods,  waters,  water  courses,  rights,  liberties  privileges  hereditaments  and 
appertenances  whatsoever  thereunto  belonging  or  in  any  wise  appertain- 
ing (subject  nevertheless  to  the  above  Dower  lien)  and  the  reversions  and 
remainders  rents.  Issues,  and  profits  thereof;  and  also  all  the  estate  right 
title  Interest  Property  claim  and  demand  whatsoever  of  the  said  Henry  H. 
Stout  at  and  Immediately  before  the  time  of  his  decease  in  Law  or  Equity 
or  otherwise  howsoever,  of,  in,  to  or  out  of  the  same.  TO  HAVE  AND 
TO  HOLD  the  said  Messuage  Plantation  and  Tract  of  Seventy  Two  acres 
and  one  hundred  and  eighteen  perches  of  land  hereditaments  and  premises 
hereby  granted  or  mentioned  or  Intended  so  to  be  with  the  appertenances 
unto  the  said  Philip  Cressman  his  heirs  and  assigns,  to  the  only  proper  use 
and  behoof  of  the  said  Philip  Cressman  his  heirs  and  assigns  forever,  and 
the  said  Enos  Stout  and  Tobias  Fluck  administrators  aforesaid  for  them- 
selves their  heirs  executors  and  administrators  do  severally  and  not 
Jointly,  nor  the  one  for  the  other,  or  for  the  act  or  deed  of  the  other,  but 
each  for  his  own  acts  only,  covenant,  promise,  grant  and  agree  to  and  with 
the  said  Philip  Cressman  his  heirs  and  assigns  by  these  presents  that  they 
the  said  Enos  Stout  and  Tobias  Fluck  have  not  heretofore  done  or  com- 
mitted any  act,  matter  or  thing  whatsoever  whereby  the  promises  hereby 
granted  or  any  part  thereof,  is,  are,  or  shall  or  may  be  impeached,  charged, 
or  encumbered,  in  title,  charge,  Estate,  or  otherwise  howsoever.  IN  WIT- 
NESS WHEREOF  the  said  Enos  Stout  and  Tobias  Fluck  administra- 


THE  STOUT  FAMILY 


231 


tors  aforesaid  have  hereunto  set  their  hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year 
first  above  v^ritten,^ 

Sealed  and  delivered  in  Enos  Stout 

the  presence  of  Us  Tobias  Fluck 

L.  K.  Stout 

John  A.  Loux 

Received  on  the  day  of  the  date  of  the  above  Indenture  of  the  above 
named  Philip  Cressman  the  sum  of  Twenty  five  hundred  and  twenty  one 
dollars  and  fifty  seven  cents  which  together  with  the  above  mentioned 
dower  fund,  when  paid,  will  be  the  above  mentioned  consideration  in  full. 

Enos  Stout 
Tobias  Fluck 


^==J(rli/i^     'f/^///^iii 


/>J0^/^     ^'0^ 


1  Original  deed  and  draft  in  possession  of  the  present  owner  of  the  property. 


232  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Elizabeth  Kern  Stout  outlived  her  husband  fully  twenty  years. 
She  died  June  5,  1871,  aged  ninety-three  years  and  twenty-six  days. 
They  are  both  buried  in  Tohickon  Churchyard,  in  the  lot  belong- 
ing to  Enos  Stout. 

Children  of  Henry  H.  Stout  and  Elisabeth  Kern: 

1.  CATHERINE  STOUT,  born  November  4,  1798;  died  October 

7,    1838;    married    Rev.    JOHN    ANDREW    STRASS- 
BURGER. 

2.  Anna   Maria   Stout,   born    November  9,    1800;   married   Henry 

Cressman. 

3.  Samuel  Stout,  born  February  7,  1803 ;  married  Eliza  Stoneback. 

4.  Magdalena  Stout,  born  July  5,  1805;  married  Philip  Cressman. 

5.  Hannah  Stout,  born  December  27,  1807 ;  married  John  Stouver. 

6.  Elizabeth   Stout,  born   September   16,    1810;  married   Abraham 

Roudenbush. 

7.  Enos  Stout,  born  April  17,  1813 ;  married  Catherine  Kratz. 

8.  Lydia  Stout,  born  January  16,  1816;  married  David  Creamer. 

9.  Annie  Stout,  born  1821 ;  married  Tobias  Pluck. 

DESCENT  PROM  JACOB  STOUT 

VIII.  Jacob  Stout  married  Anna  Miller  Lacey. 

VII.  Abraham  Stout  married  Mary  Magdalena  Hartzell. 

VI.  Henry  Hartzell  Stout  married  Elizabeth  Kern. 

V.  Catherine  Stout  married  John  Andrew  Strassburger. 

IV.  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  married  Elizabeth  Schwenk. 

HI.  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Mary  Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


Indian  Creek  Reformed  Church. 


The  HARTZELL  FAMILY 


J  ORG  HENRICH  HARTZELL,  a  native  of  Switzerland, 
born  circa  1692,  came  to  this  country  in  the  early  part  of 
the  eighteenth  century,  when  about  forty  years  of  age,  and 
settled  in  Rockhill  Township,  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania,  where 
he  died,  "at  an  advanced  age,"  June  24,  1784.  It  is  said  that  he 
was  accompanied  to  their  new  home  by  his  wife  and  two  children 
and  a  brother,  Ulrick.  This  Ulrick  Hartzell,  according  to  family 
papers  in  the  possession  of  his  descendants,  was  born  in  Switzer- 
land, August  20,  1705;  he  bought  land  near  Tylersport,  Mont- 
gomery County,  and  died  there,  February  11,  1771;  his  son  Mark 
died  the  same  day  and  both  were  buried  three  days  later,  in  one 
grave,  in  a  private  burial  ground  known  as  Dietz'  Graveyard 
in  Upper  Salford  Township,  Montgomery  County/ 

Henrich  Hartzell  was  buried  in  the  graveyard  at  Christ,  or 
Indian  Creek  Reformed  Church,  located  about  one  mile  from  his 
place  of  residence.  Close  to  the  wall  of  the  church,  next  to  the 
cemetery,  is  a  large  flat  stone.  From  the  inscription  it  is  evident 
that  this  was  a  memorial  tablet  placed  here  long  after  the  death  of 
both  Henrich  Hartzell  and  his  wife,  as  two  mistakes  are  made  in 
the  inscription  which  records  that  he  and  his  wife  came  to  this 
country  in  1727  and  that  he  died  in  1788,  whereas  there  is  indis- 
putable evidence  that  the  date  of  their  arrival  was  in  September, 
1732,  and  that  he  died  in  the  spring  of  1784. 

IN  MEMORY  OF 

HEINRICH  HERZEL  AND 

WIFE  AND  TWO  CHILDREN 

Who  emigrated  from  the 

Palatinate  in  1727.    Being 

the  first  settlers  in  Rockhill 

Twp.     Died  in  1788,  at  an 

advanced  agfe. 


1  Records  in  the  possession  of  the  descendants  of  Ulrick  Hartzell. 


234  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

The  early  Palatines,  as  they  arrived  in  Pennsylvania,  were 
required  to  take  an  oath,  or  declaration,  of  allegiance  to  the  King 
of  Great  Britain.  There  were  three  lists  made  of  the  passengers 
of  each  vessel  that  landed  at  a  Pennsylvania  port,  one  of  which 
was  taken  by  the  master  of  the  ship  and  attested  as  exact  and  true. 
Most  of  these  are  still  preserved  in  the  Secretary's  Office  at  Harris- 
burg,  and  this  list  contains  the  names  of  all  male  passengers  above 
the  age  of  sixteen,  and  some  of  them,  the  names  of  all  the  passengers. 
If  any  had  died,  or  were  sick,  on  the  arrival  of  the  ship,  they  were 
marked  accordingly.  The  second  list  contains  all  the  names  of 
males  above  the  age  of  sixteen,  who  were  made  to  repeat  and 
subscribe  to  the  Declaration  of  Allegiance,  with  their  own  hands, 
if  they  could  write;  if  they  could  not,  the  name  was  written  by  a 
clerk  and  the  qualified  person  made  his  mark. 

The  first  list  appears  upon  the  Provincial  Records  of  the 
Commonwealth  and  is  reprinted  in  the  second  series  of  the  Penn- 
sylvania Archives.  The  second  list  was  published  many  years  ago 
by  Professor  I.  Daniel  Rupp  under  the  title  "A  Collection  of 
Thirty  Thousand  Names  of  Immigrants  to  Pennsylvania,  from 
1727  to  1776." 

It  can  be  readily  seen  that  these  several  lists  would  not  agree 
in  every  instance,  particularly  when  English  masters  of  ships 
wrote  the  German  name,  or  English  clerks  wrote  down  the  name 
of  the  immigrant  who  could  not  write,  or  was  too  ill  to  sign  for 
himself. 

On  September  21,  1732,  the  following  persons  by  name  of 
Hartzell,  having  reached  Pennsylvania  on  the  ship  Pi7tk  Plaisance, 
were  qualified  as  citizens  of  the  Commonwealth.  A  careful  com- 
parison of  these  various  lists,  with  due  allowance  being  made  for 
the  difference  in  spelling  as  explained  above,  prove  beyond  ques- 
tion that  Henrich  and  Ulrick  Hartzell,  with  others  of  the  name, 
came  to  this  country  five  years  later  than  the  date  recorded  on  the 
tombstone.  Also  by  comparing  the  handwriting  in  the  signature 
to  the  Declaration  with  that  found  on  his  will,  there  seems  to  be  no 
room  for  questioning  the  identity  of  the  passenger  on  the  Pink 
Plaisance  with  that  of  the  first  settler  in  Rockhill  Township,  Bucks 
County.  The  dates  found  upon  the  will  show  that  Henrich  died  in 
1784  and  not  in  1788,  as  appears  upon  the  memorial  stone. 


THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  235 

The  proof  for  the  foregoing  assertion  is  based  on  the  following 
documents : 

List  of  Foreigners  Imported  in  the  Ship  Pink  Plaisance,  John 
Paret,  Master,  From  Rotterdam.     Qualified  Sept.  21,  1732.^ 

Paulus  Hertzel 
Henrich  Hertzell 
Heinrich  Harstlich 
Hans  Leonhart  Hertzell 

The  original  list  is  herezuith  given 
Names  Age. 

Paulus  Hartsligh    50 

Henrick    Hartsligh    50 

Hendrix    Hartsligh    40 

Hendrix   Hartsligh,    jun 17 

Lenard  Hartsell 24 

Urigg  Hartsell    18 

Women's  Names. 

Catarrina   Hartsell    51 

Barbr  Hartsell    50 

Christan  Hartsel  27 

Children 
Jacob  Benia  Hatslin 
Eliz  Hezelarin 

Minutes  of  the  Provincial  Council.^ 

At  the  Courthouse  aforesaid,  Sepr.  21st,  1732. 
Present. 

The  Honble  the  Govr.,  with  the  Mayor  &  other  Magistrates. 

Seventy  two  Palatines,  who  with  their  families,  making  in  all  One 
hundred  eighty  eight  Persons,  were  imported  in  the  Pink  Plaisance,  John 
Paret,  Mr,  from  Rotterdam,  but  last  from  Cowes,  as  by  Clearance  thence, 
were  in  like  manner  qualified,  &  their  Names  are  as  follows : 

Paulus  Hertsell 

Henrich  Hartzell 

Henrich  Stertzell 

Hans  Leond.  Hartsell 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Vol.  XVII,  pp.  53,  55,  57. 

2  Colonial  Records  of  Pennsylvania,  Vol.  Ill,  p.  454. 


236  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Sept.  22,  1732.  Palatines  imported  in  the  ship  Pink  Plaisance,  John 
Paret,  Master,  from  Rotterdam,  last  from  Cowes.  Seventy-seven  males 
above  sixteen,  twenty-eight  under  sixteen ;  sixty-eight  females  above  six- 
teen and  fifteen  under  sixteen — in  all  one  hundred  and  eighty-eight.^ 

Paulus  Hertzel 

Henrich  Hertzell 

Henrich  Hartsligh 

Hans  Leonhart  Hertzell 

Ulrich  Hottell.  Sick 

It  is  not  known,  at  the  present  writing,  just  what  relation  these 
several  families  of  the  same  name  bore  to  each  other.  However,  it 
is  kno\vn  for  a  certainty  that  Henrich  and  Ulrick  were  brothers, 
and  as  the  same  Christian  names  occur  in  each  family  it  is  believed 
they  were  all  connected.  The  ages,  as  recorded  by  the  captains  of 
the  vessels,  were,  for  the  most  part,  approximate,  as  Ulrick's  age 
is  given  as  eighteen,  when,  according  to  family  records,  he  was 
born  in  1705,  and  was,  therefore,  twenty-seven  years  old.  Nothing 
is  known  of  the  Henrich  Hartsligh  (Hertsell),  whose  age  is  given 
as  fifty  and  who  made  his  mark  when  taking  the  Oath  or  Declara- 
tion. He  who  signed  his  own  name  to  this  document  was  no  doubt 
the  one  whose  age  appears  as  forty.  Henrich  Hertzell,  Jr.,  has  not 
been  identified. 

According  to  family  tradition,  Henrich  Hertzell,  or  Henry 
Hartzell  as  the  name  later  became,  was  accompanied  to  America 
by  his  wife  and  two  children.  The  name  of  his  wife  is  unknown, 
as  we  do  not  find  any  record  by  which  we  can  identify  her.  Accord- 
ing to  his  will,  Michael  was  the  eldest  son,  and  as  he  names  Cath- 
erine first  in  the  list  of  his  daughters,  she  was  probably  the  eldest  of 
these.  He  also  names  daughters,  Christina  and  Elizabeth,  and 
both  these  names  appear  on  the  list  of  passengers.  Christan's  age 
is  given  as  twenty-seven;  she  therefore  could  not  have  been  Hen- 
rich's  daughter,  but  she  may  have  been  his  wife.  Elizabeth  is  listed 
among  the  children.  The  other  two  women,  Catherine  and  Barbara, 
were  said  to  be  fifty-one,  which  would  seem  to  identify  them  with 
Paul  and  Henry,  the  elder. 


1 1.  Daniel  Rupp,  Thirtv  Thousand  Names  Immigrants  in  Pennsylvania,  \727- 
1776,  p.  77. 


^'-  at  c/(t/ffy  iA'rif.  '^^( /^'^^'^''i-^':^^ /^('^i/^^:-  .*.£>*;.^y ,^^^/^.c<.;»«j.'^„ 


Exequator  granted  by  King  Carol  I.  King  of   Roumania,  to 

Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger.  as  Secretary  to  Legation 

and  Consul  General,  on  August  22.  1912. 

during  the  Balkan  War. 


THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  237 

In  the  early  part  of  the  year  1740,  the  English  Parliament 
passed  a  resolution  entitled  "An  Act  for  Naturalizing  such  Foreign 
Protestants,  and  others  therein  mentioned,  as  are  settled  or  shall 
settle  in  any  of  his  Majesties  Colonies  in  America."  On  Septem- 
ber 25,  26  and  27  of  that  year,  "Those  Foreigners  who  had 
resided  for  the  space  of  seven  years  and  upwards  in  his  Majesty's 
Colonies  in  America,  and  not  having  been  absent  out  of  some  of 
the  said  Colonies  for  a  longer  space  than  two  months,  at  any  one 
time,  during  the  said  seven  years,"  were  required  to  appear  before 
the  Supreme  Court,  held  at  Philadelphia,  for  the  Province  of  Penn- 
sylvania, between  the  hours  of  nine  and  twelve  o'clock,  and  "hav- 
ing produced  to  the  said  Court  Certificates  of  their  having  taken 
the  Sacrament  of  the  Lord's  Supper  in  some  Protestant  or  Reformed 
Congregation  in  this  Province  within  three  months  before  the  said 
court,"  the  following  persons,  being  foreigners,  "Took  and  Sub- 
scribed the  Oaths  and  did  make  and  repeat  the  Declaration  pre- 
scribed by  the  said  Act,  to  entitle  them  to  the  Benefit  thereof,  and 
thereby  became  natural  born  Subjects  of  Great  Britain  as  the 
same  is  certified  into  this  office  by  the  Judges  of  the  said  Court." 
On  these  three  dates,  seventy-four  Palatines  appeared  and  took  the 
oath.  At  the  same  time  seventy-eight  Quakers,  or  those  who  con- 
scientiously objected  to  taking  an  oath,  subscribed  to  the  Declara- 
tion. 

In  the  latter  part  of  1 740,  we  find  recorded  that  Henry  Hartzell 
repeated  the  Declaration  of  Allegiance  which  made  him  a  citizen  of 
Pennsylvania — "George  Henry  Hartsle,  Bucks  County,  took  the 
Sacrament  September  22,  1740."  ' 

It  is  said  that  Henry  Hartzell  was  the  first  settler  in  Rockhill 
Township.  Rockhill  was  one  of  the  objective  points  of  German 
immigration  that  continued  up  the  Perkiomen  into  Montgomery 
County,  and  thence  over  into  Bucks  County. 

The  earliest  purchase  in  Rockhill  was  made  by  John  Furnace, 
of  Philadelphia,  December  11,  1701,  of  three  hundred  acres  of 
land.  In  1723  he  sold  this  tract  to  Andrew  Hamilton,  who  in  turn 
sold  it  to  Henrich  Hartzell.  This  land  now  bounds  the  limits  of 
Telford.     In  1737  Henrich  Hartzell  purchased  of  Evan  Griffith, 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Vol.  II,  pp.  347,  348. 


238  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

and  he  also  bought  land  in  what  is  now  Hilltown  Township.  The 
deed  for  this  latter  tract  is  on  record  at  Philadelphia,  and  in  this 
conveyance  his  name  is  spelled  "Jorg  Henrich  Hirzell,"  also 
''Henry  Hartly,"  and  sets  forth  that  the  land  was  near  "Per- 
heassing,"  evidently  intended  for  Perkasie  Manor,  while  Rockhill 
is  written  Richill. 

Deed:  Richard  Thomas  to  Jorg  Henrich  Hirzell,  1740 
C^J)i0  SnDCntUtC  made  the  Twenty  First  day  of  November  in  the 
year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  forty.  Between  Rich- 
ard Thomas  of  Lower  Dublin  Township  in  the  County  of  Philadelphia, 
Mason,  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  of  the  first  part  and  Jorg  Henrich  Hirzell 
of  Richill  in  the  County  of  Bucks,  yeoman.  WHEREAS  by  Indenture 
bearing  date  the  thirteenth  day  of  October  last  past,  Henry  Paxson  of 
Middleton  in  the  said  county  of  Bucks,  tanner,  *  *  *  did  grant  and  con- 
vey unto  the  said  Richard  Thomas  *  *  *  a  certain  tract  of  land  situate 
near  a  place  called  Perheassing  in  the  said  county  of  Bucks  (which  since 
the  laying  out  of  townships  in  those  parts  is  found  to  be  within  the  limits 
of  Hilltown  Township  *  *  *  NOW  THIS  INDENTURE  WITNESS- 
ETH that  the  said  Richard  Thomas  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  for  and  in  con- 
sideration of  the  sum  of  Ninety  pounds  *  *  *  HAVE  granted,  bargained, 
sold,  released  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Jorg  Henrich  Hirzell  a  certain 
piece  of  land,  part  of  the  aforesaid  bounded  by  lands  of  said  Richard 
Thomas,  Evan  Griffith  and  Henry  Hartly,  containing  one  hundred  acres 
*  *  *  IN  WITNESS  whereof  the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have 
interchangeably  set  their  hands  and  seals  hereunto.  Dated  the  Day  and 
Year  first  above  written.^  Richard  Thomas 

Elizabeth  Thomas. 

Henrich  Hartzell  owned,  altogether,  very  near  one  thousand 
acres  at  the  time  of  his  decease.  Most  of  the  land  lay  in  Mont- 
gomery County,  but  the  homestead  stood  over  the  line  in  Bucks 
County.  He  erected  a  cabin,  and  soon  afterward  a  more  com- 
fortable one-story  log  house,  which  had  been  altered  and  improved 
at  various  times  until  it  was  quite  a  large  two-story  old-style  dwell- 
ing house.  Unfortunately  it  was  torn  down  in  1881,  being  at  the 
time  the  oldest  house  in  Rockhill  Township, 

In  1748  he  purchased  of  Isaac  Norris,  of  Philadelphia,  five 
hundred  and  thirty  acres  adjoining  his  other  lands: 


1  Deed  Book  G,  No.  2,  p.  305.     Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  239 

Deed:  Isaac  Norris  to  Henry  Hartzell,  1748 

C^j)i$  3nD0ntUt0  made  the  Twenty  fourth  day  of  March  in  the 
year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  &  forty  eight,  BETWEEN 
Isaac  Norris  of  the  Northern  Liberties  of  the  City  of  Philadelphia,  Mer- 
chant, of  the  one  part  and  Henry  Hartzell  of  the  Township  of  Hilltown, 
in  the  County  of  Bucks,  Yeoman,  of  the  other  part, 
WITNESSETH,  That  the  said  Isaac  Norris  for  &  in  consideration  of 
the  sum  of  Six  Hundred  and  Thirty  Six  Pounds  lawful  money  of  Penn- 
sylvania unto  the  said  Isaac  Norris  well  and  truly  paid  by  the  said  Henry 
Hartzell,  the  receipt  whereof  is  hereby  acknowledged,  hath  granted,  bar- 
gained, sold,  released  and  confirmed,  *  *  *  unto  the  said  Henry 
Hartzell,  A  Certain  piece  or  tract  of  land  situate  in  Hilltown,  in  the  County 
of  Bucks  aforesaid, 

BEGINNING  at  a  corner  White  Oak  marked  I  L  standing  in  the  line  of 
a  tract  of  land  late  of  Thomas  Freame  Dec'd,  thence  extending  along  the 
same  line  and  the  line  of  a  tract  of  land  laid  out  for  Servants,  southwest 
two  hundred  and  eighty  two  perches  and  three  quarters  of  a  perch  to  a 
post,  thence  by  land  of  James  Logan  southeast,  three  hundred  perches  to 
a  small  Hickory,  thence  northeast,  by  other  land  of  the  said  James  Logan, 
two  hundred  and  eighty  two  perches  and  three  quarters  of  a  perch  to  a 
post  in  the  line  of  the  Proprietaries  Manor  of  Perkesy,  thence  by  the 
same  Manor  northwest  three  hundred  perches  to  the  place  of  Beginning. 
Containing  Five  Hundred  and  Thirty  Acres  of  land  be  the  same  more 
or  less  *************  * 
To  have  an  to  hold  the  said  piece  or  tract  of  land  hereditaments  and 
premises  hereby  granted  or  mentioned  to  be  granted  with  the  appurte- 
nances unto  the  said  Henry  Hartzel  his  heirs  and  assigns,  to  the  only 
proper  use  and  behoof  of  ye  said  Henry  Hartzell  his  heirs  and  assigns 
forever. 

Under  the  Proportionable  part  of  the  Yearly  Quit  Rent  hereafter  accruing 
for  the  hereby  granted  piece  of  land,  to  the  Chief  Lord  or  Lords  of  the 
Fee  thereof  *************** 
In  Witness  Whereof  the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have  Interchange- 
ably set  their  Hands  and  Seals  hereunto  dated  the  day  and  year  above 
written.^ 

Sealed  &  Delivered  Isaac  Norris  (Seal) 

in  the  presence  of  us : 

James  Wright 

Eliz'a  Norris 


1  Deed  Book  F,  Vol.  II,  p.  448.    Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


240  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Henrich  Hartzell  cleared  the  heavy  timber,  and  soon  had  a 
fine  farm.  On  February  27,  1767,  he  made  application  to  the 
Proprietaries  of  the  Commonwealth  for  a  grant  of  fifteen  acres  of 
land  adjoining  his  larger  tract,  lying  in  Upper  Salford  Township 
on  the  Montgomery  County  side.  Thus  ten  acres  and  one  hundred 
and  two  perches  was  surveyed  to  him  and  called  "Harts  All,"  for 
which  he  received  a  patent  May  18th  of  the  same  year. 


A  draft  of  a  tract  of  land  situate  in  upper  Salford  Township  in  the  County  of 
Philadelphia  and  Province  Pennsylvania  containing  ten  acres  and  102  perches  of 
land  together  with  the  usual  allowance  at  six  per  cent  for  roads  that  was  surveyed 
unto  Henry  Hartzell  by  virtue  of  an  order  from  the  Surveyor  General  dated  at 
Philadelphia  on  the  twenty-seventh  day  of  February,  Anno.  1767.  Being  number 
2357,  granted  to  him  in  pursuance  of  an  application  maid  by  the  said  Henry  Hart- 
zell for  the  same  surveyed  on  the  10th  March  Anno.  1767. 
(called  Harts-all)  P.  David  Shultze 

Patent  to  Henry  Hartzell,  1767 

John  Penn,  Thomas  Penn  and  Richard  Penn,  Esquires,  true  and 
absolute  Proprietaries  and  Governors  in  Chief  of  the  Province  of  Penn- 
sylvania, and  Counties  of  New  Castle,  Kent  and  Sussex  on  Delaware.  To 
all  unto  whom  these  Presents  shall  come.  Greeting:  WHEREAS  in 
Consequence  of  the  Application  of  Henry  Hartzell,  No.  2357,  dated  the 


I^IFE  AND  TWO  CHILDREN 

Who  Gmig^'cv(:Gdfro7n  ihB  ^ 

PcilctiiiicvtG  h%  172Z  B&ing  1 

f  1 

^ihe  fiis-t  setilei-  iriBoch 

fvill  Hip.  Died  in  17SS.  at 

E       cm.  a.fl'uaixCGcl  rxgc. 


Toml)stone  to  the  Memory  of  Henry  Hartzcll. 
erected   some   years    after   his    death. 


THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  241 

twenty-seventh  day  of  February  last  past  for  fifteen  acres  of  land  in, 
Upper  Salford  Township  in  the  County  of  Philadelphia,  a  Survey  hath 
been  made  of  a  tract  of  land  called  "Harts  All"  adjoining  Lands  of  Val- 
entine Boyer,  Leonard  Snyder,  Henry  Hertsell's  other  land,  containing 
ten  acres  and  one  hundred  and  two  perches  *  *  NOW  know  ye  that  for 
and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  six  shillings  and  nine  pence  sterling 
money  of  Great  Britain  (in  lawful  money  of  Pennsylvania)  We  have 
given,  granted  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Henry  Hartzell  the  said  ten 
acres  and  one  hundred  and  two  perches  of  land.  In  Witness  whereof 
John  Penn,  Esquire,  Lieutenant  Governor  of  said  Province,  hath  hereunto 
caused  the  Great  Seal  of  our  said  Province  to  be  hereunto  affixed  this 
eighteenth  day  of  May,  1767.^ 

John  Penn. 

Henrich  Hartzell  died  June  21,  1784,  aged  over  ninety  years, 
and  was  buried  at  Christ  Reformed  Church,  Indian  Creek.  He 
left  a  will,  which  was  dated  May  17,  1784,  and  proved  August  5, 
same  year,  his  death  having  occurred  on  June  21.  As  no  mention 
of  his  wife  is  made,  she  was  doubtless  deceased.  He  names  his 
sons,  Michael,  Paul  and  Henry,  and  son-in-law  Abraham  Stout, 
as  executors.  From  the  exact  apportioning  of  the  land  and  the 
time  and  manner  of  payments  designated  in  the  will,  it  may  be 
reasonably  assumed  that  Henry  Hartzell  was  very  orderly  in  his 
habits  of  life. 

Will  of  Henry  Hertzel,  1784 

In  the  Name  of  God  Amen,  I  Henry  Hertzel  of  the  Township  of 
Rockhill  in  the  county  of  Bucks  yeoman,  being  weak  of  body  but  of  sound 
mind  and  memory  (thanks  be  to  God)  do  this  Seventeenth  day  of  May  in 
the  year  of  our  Lord  One  Thousand  Seven  Hundred  &  Eighty  Four  Make 
and  publish  this  my  Last  Will  and  Testament  in  manner  and  form  as  fol- 
lows Imprimis  I  commend  my  soul  into  the  Hands  of  Almighty  God  my 
Creator  and  my  Body  to  the  Earth  to  be  in  a  decent  and  Christian  like 
manner  buried  in  hopes  of  a  joyful  Resurrection  through  the  Mercy  of  my 
Saviour  Jesus  Christ.  And  as  for  the  Temporal  Estate  wherewith  it  hath 
pleased  God  to  bless  me  I  dispose  thereof  in  the  following  manner  (that's 
to  say)  First  I  order  my  Just  debts  and  Funeral  Expenses  to  be  paid  out 
of  my  personal  Estate.  Item  I  give  and  devise  unto  my  Eldest  Son  Mich- 
ael Hertzel  a  certain  Tract,  piece  or  Parcel  of  land  part  of  the  tract  of 
land  which  I  purchased  of  Isaac  Norris  Esq.  Situate  in  the  Township  of 


1  Patent  Book  A,  No.  25,  p.  27.    Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania. 


242  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Hilltown  in  the  County  of  Bucks  and  Bounded  by  lands  of  Adam  Cabe, 
Earnest  Hair,  Isaac  Distine,  Martin  Clemmer,  and  by  land  hereinafter 
devised  to  my  son  Paul  Hertzel,  and  by  lands  of  Leonard  Seller,  Job 
Thomas,  and  others  and  by  lands  hereinafter  devised  to  my  son  Henry 
Hertzel  containing  400  acres   *  *   to  have  and  to  hold  the  said  described 
Tract  of  land  *  *  unto  my  said  son  Michael  Hertzel  his  Heirs  and  assigns 
forever  under  the  express  Limitations  that  my  said  son  Michael  Hertzel  or 
his  Heirs  or  assigns  shall  pay  or  Cause  to  be  paid  the  sum  of  £850  in 
gold  and  Silver  jMoney  for  the  same  in  the  following  manner  that  is  to 
say  the  half  part  thereof  at  the  end  of  one  year,  after  my  decease  and  the 
other  half  or  last  part  thereof  at  the  end  of  two  years  after  my  decease 
without  any  Fraud  or  Further  delay.    Item  I  give  and  devise  unto  my  son 
Paul  Hertzel  all  that  Tract  piece  or  parcel  of  Land  (which  I  purchased 
from  Abraham  Shryner)  situate  partly  in  the  Township  of  Rockhill  in  the 
County  of  Bucks  and  partly  in  the  Township  of  Upper  Salford  in  the 
county  of  Philadelphia,  containing  two  hundred  acres  and  the  usual  allow- 
ances for  Roads,  and  also  I  give  and  devise  unto  my  said  Son  Paul  Hertzel 
another  tract  or  piece  of  Land  (part  of  the  Tract  of  Land  which  I  pur- 
chased from  Isaac  Norris  Esquire),  situate  in  the  Township  of  Hiltown 
adjoining  lands  of  Martin  Clemmer  William  Sabelcool  and  Michael  Hert- 
zel, containing  50  acres    *  *   to  have  and  to  hold  the  said  described  250 
acres  of  land  unto  my  son  Paul  Hertzel  his  heirs  and  assigns  forever 
Under  the  Express  Limitation  that  my  said  son  Paul  Hertzel  or  his  Heirs 
shall  pay  or  cause  to  be  paid  for  the  said  land  the  sum  of  £650  and  in  the 
following  manner  that  is  to  say  one  third  part  at  the  end  of  one  year  after 
my  decease  and  one  third  part  at  the  end  of  two  years  after  my  decease 
and  one  third  part  at  the  end  of  three  years  after  my  decease  without  any 
fraud  or  further  delay.    Item  I  give  and  devise  to  my  Son  Henry  Hertzel 
my  Plantation  on  which  I  live  situate  and  being  partly  in  Rockhill  and 
partly  in  Hilltown  bounded  by  the  line  dividing  the  County  of  Bucks  and 
Philadelphia  and  by  lands  of  Abraham  Gerhart  Samuel  Bechtel  Earnest 
Hair,  Adam  Cobe,  Abraham  Cobe  and  Len  Thomas  containing  275  acres 
and  also  I  give  and  devise  to  my  said  son  Henry  Hertzel  a  tract  of  land 
situate  in  Hilltown  Township  adjoining  Adam  Cobe's  land,  Land  late  of 
John  Seller,  land  of  Job  Thomas  son  Alichael  Hertzel  containing  55  acres, 
to  have  and  to  hold  the  said  275  acres  and  55  acres  unto  my  son  Henry 
Hertzel  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  forever,  under  the  Express  Limitations  that 
my  said  son  Henry,  his  heirs  and  assigns  shall  pay  or  cause  to  be  paid  for 
the  same  the  sum  of  £650  in  yearly  payments  the  first  payment  thereof  to 
be  at  the  end  of  one  year  after  my  decease  without  any  fraud  or  further 
delay.     Item  I  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  Son  Henry  my  best  Waggon 


THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  243 

and  two  Horses  and  a  Colt  and  compleat  Gears  for  two  Horsses,  one 
plough,  one  harrow,  and  all  the  Boards  on  the  Horse  Stable.    Item  I  give 
and  bequeath  unto  each  of  my  Daughters  Hannah  and  Susannah  a  feather 
Bed  and  Bedsteads  two  Milch  Cows  and  one  Heiffer,  one  Table,  Chest, 
and  Kitchen  Shelve,  and  ten  pounds  in  Money   (in  Lieu  of  the  other 
Kitchen  Furniture  which  I  give  to  my  other  Daughters)  and  two  Sheep 
to  be  paid  unto  them  within  two  Months  after  my  Decease ;  and  further 
is  my  Will  that  all  my  Monies  and  all  what  is  due  or  becomes  due  to  me 
on  Bonds,  Notes,  Mortgages,  or  otherwise,  and  all  the  Moneyes  which  my 
Sons  Michael,  Paul,  and  Henry  are  hereinbefore  ordered  to  pay  for  the 
Lands  devised  unto  them,  and  all  my  Goods  and  Chattels  not  herein  before 
mentioned  to  be  given  and  bequeathed  shall  be  equally  divided  to  and  be- 
tween my  Sons  Michael,  Paul,  and  Henry  and  my  Daughters  Catharine, 
Christina,  Margaret,  Sophia,  Magdalena,  Elisabeth,  Hannah  and  Susanna, 
Share  and  Share  alike;  and  further  is  my  will  and  meaning  that  all  the 
Monies  which  my  Sons  shall  pay  for  the  Lands  Devised  unto  them  shall 
be  paid  in  Good  Gold  and  Silver  at  no  less  rate  then  the  same  passes  for  at 
this  present  time ;  And  lastly  I  do  hereby  Nominate  and  appoint  my  Sons 
Michael  Hertzel,  Paul  Hertzel  and  Henry  Hertsel  and  my  Son  in  law 
Abraham  Stout  Executors  of  this  my  last  Will  and  Testament  giving  and 
granting  unto  them  or  the  Survivors  of  them  full  power  and  authority  to 
Execute  all  Deeds  and  Releases  in  my  name  and  steac)  and  I  allow  them 
reasonable  Charges  and  no  more  for  their  trouble  in  the  premisses.     IN 
WITNESS  whereof  I  the  said  Henry  Hertzel  have  to  this  my  last  Will 
and  Testament  set  my  Hand  and  seal  Dated  the  Day  and  Year  first  above 
written.^ 

Signed  Sealed  published  and  declared 
by  the  said  Testator  to  be  his  last 
Will  and  Testament  in  the  presence  of 
us 

Isaac  Dirstine 

Jacob  

John 

Proved  August  5,  1784. 

An  inventory  and  appraisement  of  the  estate  was  made  by  the 
executors  on  August  9th  following:^ 


1  Will  Book  No.  4,  p.  452.    Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Original  papers  in  Office  of  Register  of  Wills,  Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


244  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Inventory 

An  Inventory  and  appraisement  of  all  the  Goods  and  Chattels  Rights 
and  Credits  of  Henry  Hertzel  of  the  Township  of  Rockhill  in  the  County 
of  Bucks  Yeoman  Lately  Deceased;  Taken  by  Michael  Hertzel,  Paul 
Hertzel,  Henry  Hertzel  and  Abraham  Stout  Executors  of  the  Last  Will 
and  Testament  of  the  said  Deceased  and  Appraised  by  the  Subscribers  on 
the  Ninth  Day  of  August  Anno  Domini  One  thousand  Seven  Hundred 

and  Eighty  four  1784 

£       s       d 

In  Cash  Specie 122       5      0 

Imprimis     The   Deceased   Wearing  Apparel 16      7     10 

To  a  Horse  and  Saddle  £11 :10/  to  a  Mare  £10    21     10      0 
Item  To   a   Dutch   Fann    £2  to   950   Oak   Shingles 

£2:2:3      4      2      3 
To  a  Lifting  Instrument  10/  to  Some  Bundles  of 

Hemp  1/6      Oil       6 
To  55  Bundles  of  Flax  55/  to  Six  Boards  6/ 

to  Hay  Ladders  7/6      3       8      6 
To  an  old  Waggon  £3  to  Eleven  Cow  Chains  20/6  to  fet- 
ters 2/426 
To  a   Swingle  tree  and   Cleves   5/  to   plough   Irons  &  a 

Cleves  20/  1  5  0 
To  forty  two  Open  Hogsheads  £2:15  to  two  Barrels  8/330 
To  a  Drag  Chain  7/6  to  two  pitch  forks  3/6  to  two  Dung 

forks  2/6  0  13  6 
To  two  Dung  hooks  3/  to  Horse  Gears  and  Blind  halters  25/  18  0 
To  hemp  tow  and  flax  10/6  to  830  feet  of  popler  Boards 

£3:2/       3     12      6 
To  an  Apple  Mill  and  Trough  22/6  to  three  old  Baggs  & 

some  tow  7/6       1     10      0 
To  old  Copper  15/  to  a  Still  head  30/  to  two  Small  old 

Copper  Kettles  5/300 
To  an  Iron  Door  and  a  Stoave  plate  18/  to  a  Barrel  3/  a 

Grindstone  10/       1     11       0 
To  an  old  Saddle  2/  a  Grubbing  hoe  7/6  a  Shovel  five/  a 

hoe  2/6      0     17      0 
To  two  old  Cows  &  a  Bell  £8  a  heiffer  40/  to  a  stear  &  a 

Bull  Calves  50/     12     10      0 
To  three  Sheep  22/6  to  four  Shoates  27/6  2     10       0 

To  a  pek  5/  to  Mallrings  and  Wedges  5/  to  an  ax  2/6  a 

Cagg  2/      0     12      6 


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Certificate    issued    to    Ralph     IJeaver    Strassburger    by     Lord 

Bristol,  President  of  the  Institution  of  Naval  Architects 

of  Great  P.ritain,  on  the  27th  of  March,  1912. 


THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  245 

To  five  Hogsheads  37/6  to  four  do  20/  to  a  Barrel  3/  to 

one  do  4/      3      6      6 
To  a  Churn  10/  a  funnel  9d  to  two  pair  of  Butter  Boxes 

12/6       1       3       3 

To  a  Bed  and  Bedstead  £3  to  one  do  £3  to  one  do  £3  to  one 

do  £2     11       0      0 

To  a  Bed  and  Bedstead  £5  a  Meal  Chest  20/  a  Small  Chest 

15/      6     15      0 
To  five  Baskets  5/9  to  three  reedles  4/6  to  fourteen  Baggs 

£1:6/       1     16      3 

To  a  Cross  Cut  Saw  7/6  a  funnel  5/  to  a  Womans  Saddle 

15/      1      7      6 

To  three  old  Little  Wheels  12/6  a  rope  1/  to  an  old  pigeon 

Nett  5/      0     18      6 

To  two  Hatchels  15/  a  Coffee  Mill  5/  a  Box  Iron  3/9  to 

two  Bottles  2/6       16      3 
To  tea  and  Earthen  Ware  3/9  to  two  vials  8d  to  knives  and 

forks  7/6       0     11     11 

To  a  Butter  Seale  2/  to  a  Steel  Yard  10/  a  Big  Wheel  10/ 

a  cotton  do  7/6       19      6 
To  two  Sheep  Shears  4/  to  Eight  Buckits  8/  a  Large  Tub 

7/6  a  Small  do  1/       1       0       6 
To  a  Wash  Tub  10/  to  a  Cabbage  Tub  5/  to  twelve  Wooden 

Trenchers  3/      0     18      0 
To  an  old  Iron  Kettle  5/  a  Large  Skillet  10/  a  Bake  Iron 

7/6  a  Roast  Pan  3/9       16      3 
To  a  Whetting  pot  2/6  a  razor  1/  a  flesh  fork  1/  a  Ladle 

and  Skimmer  3/076 
To  an  Iron  pot  10/  to  one  5/  a  frying  pann  5/  to  two  Skil- 

ets  7/170 
To  Tin  Ware  6/10  to  Lumber  2/  to  pewter  ware  £2 :  6/  to  a 

Lan  thorn   1/6       2     16      4 
To  a  Tea  kettle  10/  Earthenware  5/6  a  Stone  jarr  2/  old 

Brass  1/6       0     19       0 

To  two  Glasses  3/  to  two  Tumblers  3/  to  two  Glass  Bottles 

1/6      0      7      6 


£          243     16  10 

To  a  Kitchen  Shelve  20/  a  pot  Shelve  1/6  to  a  Table  2/6             14  0 
To  two  pot  racks  12/  to  tongs  and  Shovel  6/  to  a  Crow 

Barr  8/4       16  4 


246 


THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


To  a  hand  Saw  4/  to  an  Adds  4/6  to  a  Small  Saw  2/  to 

five  augres  12/3       12  9 
To  a  Draw  Knife  1/  to  three  Chissel  2/9  two  Cleavers 

4/6      0  8  3 

To  Lumber  2/  to  a  pipe  Stoave  £7  to  a  Clock  and  Case  £4     11  2  0 

To  8  1/2  Yds  of  Lindsey  34/  to  old  Curtains  15/                          2  9  0 
To  Eight  bed  and  pillow  Cases  51/  to  Eight  Bed  Sheets 

51/6       5  2  6 
To  ten  Table  Cloths  51/  to  Eleven  Towels  11/  to  five  Wal- 
lets 7/6      3  9  6 
To  three  Towels  3/6  to  a  spade  5/  a  hoe  6d  a  Candle- 
stick 1/      0  10  0 

To  pinchers  1/6  a  Spectacle  1/  a  Table  7 /d  a  Chest  20/ 1  10  0 

To  Gold  Scales  7/6  an  Arm  Chair  7/6  to  Eight  Chairs  17/       1  12  0 

To  a  parcel  of  old  German  Books                                                    2  6  0 

Book  Debts                                                                                    25  10  10 
Due  on   Notes   on   Hand    £47:10/  Interest  Due   thereon 

£5:18:10d     53  8  10 

Due  and  to  become  Due  on  Bonds  or  Obligations                   3111  7  0 

Interest  Due  on  the  said  Bonds                                                    269  1  10 

Due  and  to  become  due  on  four  Mortgages                               910  0  0 

Interest  Due  on  the  said  Mortgage                                              43  7  0 


Total  Sum 
Specified  Legacys  given  by  the  Will 
To  his  Son  Henry  Boards  on  the  Stable 
A  Waggon  two  Horses  and  Horse  Gears 
To  a  Colt  £  10  a  plough  50/  a  Harrow  25/ 
To  his  Daughter  Hannah  two  Milch  Cows 
A  Heififer  40/  to  two  Sheep  20/ 
To  his  daughter  Susanna  Two  Milch  Cows 
A  Heiffer  40/  to  two  Sheep  20/ 


Sum  of  the  Specific  Legacys 

Whole  sum  £     4785      8 


£4688 

13 

8 

5 

0 

0 

50 

0 

0 

13 

15 

0 

11 

0 

0 

3 

0 

0 

11 

0 

0 

3 

0 

0 

96 

15 

0 

By  us 


Isaac  Hunsberger 
Isaac  Dirstine 


The  Tenth  Day  of  September  Anno  Domini  1784  Before  me  John  Davis 
Esqe  One  of  the  justices  of  the  peace  in  and  for  the  County  of  Bucks 


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THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  247 

Came  the  above  Named  Isaac  Hunsberger  and  Isaac  Dirstine  And  on 

their  Solemn  Affirmation  Did  Declare  and  Say  that  they  have  Well  and 

truly  Valued  and  Appraised  all  the  Goods  and  Chattels  Rights  and  Credits 

of  Henry  Hertzel  Deceased  According  to  the  best  of  their  Understanding 

and   judgment   and   that   the    foregoing   Writing   is   a  True   Inventory 

thereof 

Witness  my  Hand  the  Day  and  Year  Above  said 

John  Davis 

In  this  will,  Mr.  Hartzell  bequeathed  to  his  eldest  son,  Michael, 
a  tract  of  land  in  Hilltown  Township,  part  of  that  purchased  of 
Isaac  Norris,  and  to  his  sons,  Paul  and  Henry,  other  portions  of 
his  lands,  Henry  to  have  the  home  plantation,  while  to  his  daugh- 
ters, eight  in  number,  he  left  their  proportion  of  the  personal  estate, 
Bonds,  Notes,  Mortgages,  etc. 

Michael  Hartzell  died  soon  after  his  father,  intestate,  leaving 
a  widow,  but  no  children.  The  administrators  of  his  estate  were 
his  widow  Catherine,  Jacob  Reed  and  brother-in-law  Abraham 
Stout.  On  August  16,  1788,  all  the  brothers  and  sisters  of  Michael 
signed  a  document,  acknowledging  the  receipt  of  their  proper  shares 
of  their  brother's  estate,  from  the  above-mentioned  administrators. 
This  interesting  paper  gives  the  names  of  all  the  sons  and  daughters 
and  sons-in-law  of  Henry  Hartzell. 

Release  of  Heirs  of  Michael  Hartzell  to 
Catherine  Hartzell  et  al,  1788 

TO  ALL  PEOPLE  TO  WHOM  THESE  PRESENTS  SHALL  COME: 
We,  Paul  Hertzel,  Henry  Hertzel,  Jacob  Hertzel  and  Catharine, 
his  wife,  Abraham  Cobe  and  Christina,  his  wife,  Adam  Cobe  and  Mar- 
garet his  wife,  John  Althouse  and  Sophia  his  wife,  Abraham  Stout  and 
Magdalena,  his  wife,  Henry  Blyler  and  Elizebeth  his  wife,  Henry  Drum- 
bore  and  Hannah  his  wife,  and  Peter  Scholl  and  Susanna  his  wife,  (the 
said  Paul  and  Henry  Hertzel  are  two  of  the  Sons,  and  the  said  Catharine, 
Christina,  Margaret,  Sophia,  Magdalena,  Elizabeth,  Hannah  and  Susanna 
are  the  Daughters  of  Henry  Hertzel,  late  of  the  Township  of  Rockhill,  in 
the  County  of  Bucks  and  Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania  Yeoman,  De- 
ceased), send  Greeting, 

Whereas  the  said  Henry  Hertzel,  deceased,  by  his  Last  Will  and  Testa- 
ment, dated  the  Seventeenth  day  of  May  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 


248  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

eighty  four  (which  said  Last  Will  some  time  after  his  decease  was  duly- 
proved  and  Registered  as  the  Law  directs)  did  devise  unto  his  Son  Michael 
Hertzel,  a  certain  tract  of  land  situate  in  the  Township  of  Hilltown,  by 
mets  and  bounds  in  the  said  last  will  set  forth  and  described,  Containing 
four  hundred  acres  (be  the  same  more  or  less)  **=!=***** 
To  hold  to  him  his  heirs  and  assigns  for  ever,  Under  the  express  limita- 
tion, that  he  or  his  heirs  or  assigns  should  pay  for  the  same  the  sum  of 
Eight  hundred  and  fifty  Pounds  lawful  money  of  Pennsylvania  in  Specie 
(of  which  said  sum  he  should  also  receive  one  equal  eleventh  part)  as  by 
the  said  Last  Will  may  more  fully  appear,  And  Whereas  the  said  Michael 
Hertzel  soon  after  the  proving  of  the  said  recited  last  Will  also  died 
Intestate,  and  Letters  of  Administration  of  his  Goods,  Chattels  and  Credits 
were  given  and  granted  unto  his  widow,  Catharine  Hertzel,  Jacob  Reed 
and  Abraham  Stout,  Now  Know  Ye,  that  we  have  had  and  received  of  the 
administrators  of  the  estate  of  the  said  Michael  Hertzel,  deceased,  before 
the  day  of  the  date  hereof  the  sum  of  Seven  Hundred  and  three  Pounds 
and  Sixteen  Shillings  lawful  money  of  Pennsylvania,  in  Silver  and  Gold, 
together  with  lawful  interest  for  the  same  from  the  time  the  same  become 
due  unto  us  untill  the  same  was  paid  unto  us,  in  full  satisfaction  of  all  our 
demands  and  shares  of  the  aforesaid  legacies,  which  the  said  Michael 
Hartzel  (deceased)  by  the  said  recited  Last  Will  and  Testament  of  his 
father  Henry  Hertzel,  deceased,  is  ordered  to  pay  unto  us.  And  We  the 
said  Paul  Hertzel,  Henry  Hertzel,  Jacob  Hertzel  and  Catharine,  his  wife, 
Abraham  Cobe  and  Christina,  his  wife,  Adam  Cobe  and  Margaret,  his 
Wife,  John  Althouse  and  Sophia,  his  wife,  Abraham  Stout  and  Magdalena 
his  wife,  Henry  Blyler  and  Elizabeth  his  wife,  Henry  Drumbore  and 
Hannah,  his  wife,  Peter  Scholl  and  Susanna,  his  wife.  Do  hereby  for 
ourselves  our  Heirs,  Executors,  Administrators  and  every  of  them  Remise, 
Release,  Acquit,  Exonerate  and  Discharge  the  said  Administrators  and 
the  heirs  and  assigns  of  the  Real  and  Personal  Estate  of  the  said  Michael 
Hertzel,  deceased,  forever  by  these  presents. 

In  Witness  Whereof,  We  have  hereunto  set  our  hands  and  seals, 
Dated  the  Sixteenth  day  of  August  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand 
seven  hundred  and  eighty  eight.  1788.^ 

Henry  Hertsel  Abraham  Stout 

Jacob  Hertzel  her 

her  Magdalena  X  Stout 

Catharine  X  Hertzel  mark 

mark 


1  Miscellaneous  Book  No.  1,  p.  109.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  249 

Abraham  Cope  Henry  Blyler 
her  her 

Christina  X  Cope  Elizabeth  X  Blyler 

mark  mark 

Adam  Cope  Henrich  Drumbor 

her  her 

Margaret  X  Cobe  Hannah  X  Drumbore 

mark  mark 

Johannes  Althouse  Peter  Scholl 

her  her 

Sophia  X  Althouse  Susanna  X  Scholl 

mark  mark 

Paul  Hertzel 
Recorded  September  9,  1788. 

On  May  16, 1788,  seven  of  the  daughters,  with  their  husbands, 
signed  a  deed  of  acknowledgment  that  they  had  received  from  the 
executors  their  proper  share  of  their  father's  estate. 

Release,  Jacob  Hertzel  and  Wife  Catherine,  et  al, 
TO  Henry  Hertzel,  Jr.,  et  al,  1788 

TO  ALL  PEOPLE  TO  whom  these  presents  shall  come. 
We,  Jacob  Hertzel  and  Catharine  his  wife,  Abraham  Cobe  and  Christina 
his  wife,  Adam  Cobe  and  Margaret  his  wife,  John  Althouse  and  Sophia, 
his  wife,  Henry  Blyler  and  Elizabeth  his  wife,  Henry  Drumbore  and 
Hannah  his  wife,  Peter  ShoU  and  Susanna  his  wife,  (the  said  Catharine, 
Christina,  Margaret,  Sophia,  Elizabeth,  Hannah  and  Susanna  are  daugh- 
ters of  Henry  Hertzel,  late  of  the  Township  of  Rockhill,  in  the  County  of 
Bucks  and  Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania  Yeoman,  Deceased)  send 
greeting.  Know  Ye  that  we  have  had  and  received  of  Paul  Hertzel,  Henry 
Hertzel  and  Abraham  Stout  Surviving  Executors  of  the  Last  Will  and 
Testament  of  the  said  Henry  Hertzel  deceased,  the  sum  of  Two  Thousand 
Nine  Hundred  and  twenty  seven  Pounds  fourteen  Shillings  and  one 
Penny  lawful  money  of  Pennsylvania  in  Silver  and  Gold  (that  is  to  say 
the  sum  of  Four  Hundred  and  eighteen  Pounds  four  Shillings  and  ten 
pence  and  a  half  penny,  to  each  of  the  said  Daughters)  Besides  all  speci- 
fied Legacies  which  by  the  said  recited  Last  Will  and  Testament  are 
ordered  to  be  given  and  paid  unto  some  of  us;  Which  said  sum  and 
sums  of  money.  Being  in  full  satisfaction  of  all  our  shares  and  demands 
which  according  to  the  true  intent  and  meaning  of  the  said  recited  Last 
Will  we  should  and  ought  to  have  of  the  Personal  Estate  of  our  said 


250  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Deceased  Father,  Henry  Hertzel,  of  which  said  sum  of  Two  Thousand 
Nine  Hundred  and  twenty  seven  Pounds  fourteen  Shillings  and  one 
Penny  and  of  all  Specified  Legacies  given  to  same  of  us.  We  the  said 
Jacob  Hertzel  and  Catharine  his  wife,  Abraham  Cobe  and  Christina  his 
wife,  Adam  Cobe  and  Margaret  his  wife,  John  Althouse  and  Sophia  his 
wife,  Henry  Blyler  and  Elizabeth  his  wife,  Henry  Drumbore  and  Hannah 
his  wife,  and  Peter  Scholl  and  Susanna  his  wife,  Do  Hereby  for  ourselves 
our  Heirs,  Executors,  Administrators  and  every  of  them,  Remise,  Release, 
Acquit,  Exonerate  and  Discharge  the  said  Paul  Hertzel,  Henry  Hertzel 
and  Abraham  Stout,  their  Heirs,  Executors  and  Administrators  for  ever, 
of  and  from  all  or  any  demands  whatsoever  concerning  the  personal  estate 
of  the  said  Henry  Hertzel,  Deceased,  by  these  presents, 

In  Witness  Whereof,  We  have  set  our  hands  and  seals  hereunto, 
Dated  the  Sixteenth  day  of  August  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand 
seven  hundred  and  eighty  eight.    1788.^ 

Henry  Blyler  Jacob  Hertzel 

her  her 

Elizabeth  X  Blyler  Cathrina  X  Hertzel 

mark  mark 

Henrich  Drumbor  Abraham  Cope 

her  her 

Hannah  X  Drumbore  Christina  X  Cope 

mark  mark 

Peter  Scholl  Adam  Cope 

her  her 

Susanna  X  Sholl  Margaret  X  Cope 

mark  mark 

Johannes  Althouse  her 

Sophia  X  Althouse 
mark 


Henry  Hartzell  bequeathed  to  his  son,  Henry,  the  plantation 
upon  which  he  resided.  On  May  8,  1792,  all  of  the  heirs  released 
all  of  their  rights  to  the  homestead  farm  to  their  brother.  This 
release  states  that  Catherine,  widow  of  Michael,  was  at  this  date 
the  wife  of  Frederick  Fluke. 


1  Aliscellaneous  Book,  No.  1,  p.  107.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


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THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  251 

Release  of  Heirs  of  Henry  Hertzel  to 
Henry  Hertzel,  Jr.,  1792 

To  All  People  to  whom  these  presents  shall  come, 

We  Frederick  Fluke  and  Catharine,  his  wife,  (late  Widow  of  Michael 
Hertzel  dec'd)  and  Abraham  Stout  Administrator  of  the  Estate  of  Michael 
Hertzel  dec'd,  Paul  Hertzel,  Jacob  Hertzel  and  Catharine,  his  wife,  Abra- 
ham Cope  and  Christina  his  wife,  Adam  Cope  &  Margaret  his  wife,  John 
Althouse  and  Sophia  his  wife,  Abrham  Stout  and  Magdalena  his  wife, 
Henry  Blyler  &  Elizabeth  his  wife,  Henry  Drumbore  and  Hanna  his  wife, 
and  Peter  Shole  and  Susannah  his  wife,  (the  said  Michael  Hertzel  dec'd 
was  and  the  said  Paul  Hertzel  is  one  of  the  sons,  and  the  said  Catharine, 
Christina,  Margaret,  Sophia,  Magdalena,  Elizabeth,  Hannah  &  Susanna 
are  the  daughters  of  Henry  Hertzel  late  of  the  Township  of  Rockhill,  in 
the  County  of  Bucks  &  Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania  dec'd,  send  greet- 
ing, 

Whereas  the  said  Henry  Hertzel  dec'd  in  his  last  Will  and  Testament 
dated  the  17th  day  of  May  Anno  Domini  1784,  did  devise  unto  his  son 
Henry  Hertzel,  in  these  words ;  Item,  I  give  and  devise  unto  my  son  Henry 
Hertzel  my  plantation  on  which  I  live,  situate  lying  and  being  partly  in 
the  Township  of  Rockhill  aforesaid  and  partly  in  the  Township  of  Hill- 
town,  bounded  by  the  line  dividing  the  Countis  of  Bucks  and  Philadelphia 
and  by  lands  of  Abraham  Gerhart,  Samuel  Bechtel,  Earnest  Hair,  Adam 
Cobe,  Abraham  Cobe  and  Levi  Thomas,  Containing  two  hundred  and 
seventy  five  acres  and  allowances  for  roads  (be  the  same  more  or  less) 
And  also  I  give  and  devise  unto  my  said  son  Henry  Hertzel  a  piece  or 
tract  of  land,  situate  in  Hilltown  Township  aforesaid, 
BEGINNING  at  a  corner  of  Adam  Cobes  land,  thence  extending  by 
land  late  of  John  Selser  to  the  line  of  Job  Thomas  land,  thence  by  the 
same  so  far  that  a  line  running  parrelel  with  the  first  mentioned  course 
and  the  second  course,  both  by  lands  hereinbefore  devised  to  my  son 
Michael  Hertzel,  will  contain  fifty  five  acres ; 

To  have  and  to  hold  the  said  described  two  hundred  &  seventy  five  acres  & 
fifty  five  acres  of  land, 

Together  with  the  appurtenances  thereunto  belonging  unto  my  said  son 
Henry  Hertzel  his  heirs  and  assigns  forever,  under  this  Express  Limita- 
tion, that  my  said  son  Henry  or  his  heirs  or  assigns  pay  or  cause  to  be 
well'  and  truly  paid  for  the  same  the  sum  of  Six  hundred  and  fifty  pounds 
in  Gold  and  Silver,  in  four  equal  yearly  payments  as  by  the  said  recited 
last  Will  and  Testament  duly  proved  and  Registered  in  the  Register  Office 
at  Newtown,  in  the  County  of  Bucks  may  appear, 
Now  Know  Ye  that  we  the  aforesaid  Frederick  Fluke  and  Catharine  his 


252 


THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


wife,  &  Abraham  Stout  Administrator  as  aforesaid,  Paul  Hertzel,  Jacob 
Hertzel  &  Catharine  his  wife,  Abraham  Cope  and  Christina  his  wife, 
Adam  Cope  and  Margaret  his  wife,  John  Akhous  &  Sophia  his  wife, 
Abraham  Stout  and  Magdalena  his  wife,  Henry  BIyler  and  EHzabeth 
his  wife,  Henry  Drumbore  and  Hanna  his  wife,  and  Peter  Shole  and 
Susannah  his  wife  Do  hereby  confess  and  acknowledge  to  have  had  and 
received  of  the  said  Henry  Hertzel  the  sum  of  Five  hundred  and  thirteen 
pounds  and  ten  shillings  lawful  money,  in  Silver  and  Gold  (that  is  to  say 
the  sum  of  fifty  one  pounds  six  shillings  and  eleven  pence  to  each  of  us 
the  said  son's  and  daughters  of  the  said  Henry  Hertzel  dec'd)  in  full 
payment  and  satisfaction  of  all  our  parts  and  shares  of  the  said  above 
recited  sum  of  Six  hundred  and  fifty  pounds  and  all  interest  that  has 
accrued  on  the  same,  of  which  said  sum  and  of  all  right,  title,  claim  and 
demand  of,  in  or  out  of  the  said  two  tracts  of  land  and  premises,  We  do 
hereby  for  ourselves  and  our  heirs,  executors  and  administrators,  remise, 
release,  acquit,  exonerate  and  discharge  the  said  Henry  Hertzel  his  heirs 
and  assigns  forever  by  these  presents. 

In  Witness  Whereof  we  have  set  our  hands  &  seals  hereunto  dated  the 
Twenty  eight  day  of  May  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven 
hundred  &  ninety  two.^ 


JONANNES  AltHOUSE 

her 
Sophia  X  Althouse 

mark 
Abraham  Stout 

her 
Magdalena  X  Stout 

mark 
Henry  Blyler 
her 
Elizabeth  X  Blyler 

mark 
Henry  Drumbor 

her 
Hannah  X  Drumbore 

mark 
Peter  Scholl 

her 
Susanna  X  Shole 
mark 


Frederick  Fluk 

her 
Catharine  X  Fluke 
marke 

Paul  Hertzel 

Jacob  Hertzel 

her 
Catharine  X  Hertzel 

mark 
Abraham  Cope 

her 
Christina  X  Cope 

mark 
Adam  Cope 

her 
Margaret  X  Cope 
mark 


1  Deed  Book  No.  39,  Vol.  I,  p.  12,  Doylestown,  Pennsylvania 


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THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  253 

This  document  was  signed  by  all  the  heirs  who  appeared  on 
May  28,  1792,  before  their  brother-in-law,  Abraham  Stout,  then 
Justice  of  the  Peace,  and  made  the  following  acknowledgment : 

Be  it  Remembered  that  on  the  28th  day  of  May  Anno  Domini  1792, 
Before  me  the  subscriber  of  the  Justice  of  the  Peace,  in  the  County  of 
Bucks,  came  the  within  named  Frederick  Fhike  and  Catharine  his  wife, 
Paul  Hertzel,  Jacob  Hertzel  &  Catharine  his  wife,  Abraham  Cope  & 
Christina  his  wife,  Adam  Cope  &  Margaret  his  wife,  John  Althouse  & 
Sophia  his  wife,  Henry  Blyler  and  EHzabeth  his  wife,  Henry  Drumbore 
&  Hannah  his  wife,  Peter  Shole  and  Susanna  his  wife,  &  acknowledged 
the  within  written  Release  to  be  their  act  &  Deed  and  desired  that  the 
same  may  be  recorded  as  such  as  the  law  directs. 
Witness  my  hand  &  seal  on  the  day  &  above  said. 

Abraham  Stout     (seal) 

As  shown  by  original  papers,^  the  executors,  on  October  28, 
1792,  rendered  a  final  account  of  their  administration  of  their 
father's  affairs: 

The  accompts  of  Paul  Hertzel,  Henry  Hertzel,  and  Abraham  Stout 
Surviving  Executors  of  the  Last  Will  and  Testament  of  Henry  Hertzel 
Late  of  the  Township  of  Rockhill  in  the  County  of  Bucks  and  Common- 
wealth of  Pennsylvania,  Yeoman  Deceased,  Exhibited  to  the  Registers 
Court  on  the  twenty  Eighth  day  of  October  Anno  Domini  1793 

Dr.  £       s       d 

Imprimis  paid  Legacies  to  the  Several  Heirs  Mentioned  in 

the  said  Will  on  the  Eleventh  day  of  August 

1784  pr  Receipt     153     17      8 

paid     Ditto     on     the     21st     of     August     1784 

per  Receipt  4443     1 1       9 

Likewise    paid    Hannah    Hertzel    and    Susanna 

Hertzel  their  Specified  Legacies  pr  Receipts .  . . 
Item  paid  for  proving  the  Will  and  a  Copy  thereof.  . 

Do  Expenses   

To  Cash  paid  Jacob  Herr  and  John  Drumbore  pr  Receipt . 
To  do  to  Adam  Cobe  12/6  to  Abraham  Cobe  13/.  . . . 
To  do  to  Abraham  Stout  11/5  to  John  Davis  Esq""^  2/ 
To  do  to  Isaac  Dirstine  25/  to  Isaac  Hunsperger  15/.  . 
To  do        paid  for  Writings  Done  for  the  said  Estate .... 


20 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

14 

3 

1 

0 

0 

1 

5 

6 

0 

13 

5 

2 

0 

0 

3 

0 

0 

1  Original  papers  in  Office  of  Register  of  Wills,  Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


254  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

To  do          do  to  Paul  Bean  pr  Receipt    £5:5/1 5  11 

To  do  do  to  Jacob  Cressman  pr  do  £5  to  Jacob  Ap- 

penzeller  5  17  6 
To  do          do  to  the     Rev     Mr     Faber     25/     to     Peter 

Schneider  £2:17/  4  2  0 

To  do          do  to  Jacob  Appenzeller  Junior 0  3  9 

To  do          do  to  Peter  Hunsperger  pr  Receipt 3  4  8 

To  do         do  to  John  Loe  Collector  pr  two  receipts....  17  2  10 
To  do          do  to  Jacob    Kolb    pr    do    5/    to    Paul    Bean 

pr  do  12/  0  17  0 

To  do         do  to  Susanna  Hertzel  for  Bedfeathers 6  0  0 

To  do  to  Jacob    Leidy    pr    do    5/9    to    Christian 

Benner  6  8  2 

To  do               to  Jacob  Cressman  for  Joiner  Work 15  12  1 

To  do               to  John  Landes  for  Smith  work 0  3  7 

To  do  to  Isaac    Sauber    pr    do    12/5    to    Joseph 

Hornecker  pr  7/6  0  19  11 
To  do               to  the  Administrators  of  Michael  Hertzels 

Estate  Com.  3  10  0 

To  do        for  the  Settlement  and  Drawing  a  Release.  ...  1  10  0 

To               Commissioners  f  or  the  Accomptants . 17  0  0 

Balance    3  4  3 


Cr.  4719     10 

By  amount  of  the  Inventory 

Besides  the  Specified  Legacies 4688     13 

By  amount  of  money  Received  and  Remaining 

Due  not  Mentioned  in  the  Inventory 30     16 


By  us  4719     10 

Paul  Hertzel 
Henry  Heartzel 
Abraham  Stout 
Executors 
Bucks  ss 

October  28.     1793  this  Account 

Examined  and  filed 

Oct  29th  1793  this  Account  confirmed 

J.  S.  Hanna    Reg 
RicH^  Backhouse 
\YM  Hutchinson 
Judges 


THE  HARTZELL  FAMILY  255 

The  following  incident  is  related  of  the  daughter  Magdalena, 
wife  of  Abraham  Stout,  while  she  was  still  a  young  girl  at  home 
with  her  parents : 

"About  the  year  1750,  Magdalena  was  sent  to  the  Kolb  Woods 
to  hunt  up  the  cow.  She  discovered  a  young  fawn  asleep  alongside 
of  a  tree  and  looked  about  her  to  see  if  she  could  discover  the  parent 
deer,  but  not  seeing  any  traces  of  her  she  went  up  to  the  fawn  lightly 
and  spread  her  large  homespun  apron  over  it  and  captured  it  alive, 
and  ran  off  home  for  fear  of  being  pursued  by  the  parent  deer.  She 
raised  quite  a  large,  handsome  buck,  so  tame  as  to  run  about  the 
house  and  jump  the  garden  fence,  eat  the  cabbage  and  destroy  the 
vegetables  in  general,  so  that  they  were  forced  to  kill  him."  ^ 

Children  of  George  Henry  Hart  sell: 

1.  Michael  Hartzell,  probably  born  in  Switzerland,  accompanied  his 

parents  to  Pennsylvania;  inherited  a  farm  in  Hilltown 
Township,  Bucks  County,  but  died  four  years  after  his 
father;  married  Catherine. 

2.  Paul  Hartzell. 

3.  Henry  Hartzell. 

4.  Catherine  Hartzell,  married  her  cousin  Jacob,  son  of  Ulrich  Hart- 

zell of  Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania. 

5.  Christina  Hartzell,  married  Abraham  Cobe. 

6.  Margaret  Hartzell,  married  Adam  Cobe. 

7.  Sophia  Hartzell,  married  John  Althouse. 

8.  MARY  MAGDALENA  HARTZELL,  born  1751 ;  died  Novem- 

ber 8,  1811 ;  married  ABRAHAM  STOUT. 

9.  Elizabeth  Hartzell,  married  Henry  Bleyler. 

10.  Hannah  Hartzell,  married  Henry  Drumbore. 

11.  Susanna  Hartzell,  married  Peter  Scholl. 


1  Montgomery  County  Newspaper  Clippings,  Vol.  VI. 


256  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

DESCENT  FROM  JORG  HENRICH  HERTZELL 

VIII.  Jorg  Heinrich  Hertzell,  married  . 

VII.  Mary  Magdalena  Hartzell  married  Abraham  Stout. 

VI.  Henry  Hartzell  Stout  married  Elizabeth  Kern. 

V.  Catherine  Stout  married  John  Andrew  Strassburger. 

IV.  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  married  Elizabeth  Schwenk. 

III.  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Mary  Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


iar,  wt 


lierine  JBis 


who  came  to  I 

i  Aiousand  Names"  and 


.wo  child reB  of  Johri 

■vissen,  November  30.  1749,  as 
.1  :uuCi(on  Refotmed  Church  of  Bucks 
■fT  the  lists  of  tht  early  German  emi- 
ania,.  as  appear  in  Rupp's  "Thirty 

Bi^ilr^Ml^iM^'  Archives/'  have  failed 
'ae  arrival  of  a  Christian  K.e.rn  between  the 
'^-'  of  a  Frederick  Kern  prior  to  1752. 

i  among  these  early  arrivals  several  of 
:  wtm.,  lio  doubt,  closely  related  to  Frederick 

n,  or 


i;v>    u..,.  ...iog   the 

T^.7'*  on  another  list 

ime  ship  this 


I,  p.  288. 


«&• 


Elizabeth  Kern  Stout. 


«s:«<"i»f  w»-W%»'^*w^'a*!»MWt-rffiWi^'^*'^'»i'W-».  •'T'?i:'i%i'  '^v^-sBiteSi^- 


The  KERN  FAMILY 


FREDERICK  KERN,  who  was  the  ancestor  of  the  family  of 
that  name  in  Rockhill  Township,  Bucks  County,  Pennsyl- 
vania, was  born  in  Europe,  in  1697,  and  came  to  this  coun- 
try in  the  early  part  of  the  Eighteenth  Century.  It  is  not  known 
from  what  part  of  the  old  country  he  came,  but  it  is  believed  that 
the  name  is  of  Swiss  origin.  So  far,  we  have  been  unable  to  find  any 
record  of  the  arrival  of  Frederick  Kern  and  his  family  in  America. 
His  eldest  son.  Christian,  was  born,  according  to  his  tombstone 
inscription,  in  1726,  and  John  Christian  Kern  and  his  wife,  Anna 
Mary,  appear  as  witnesses  to  the  baptism  of  two  children  of  John 
and  Mary  Catherine  Bissert,  or  Rissert,  November  30,  1749,  as 
shown  by  the  records  of  Tohickon  Reformed  Church  of  Bucks 
County.  A  careful  search  of  the  lists  of  the  early  German  emi- 
grants who  came  to  Pennsylvania,  as  appear  in  Rupp's  "Thirty 
Thousand  Names"  and  the  "Pennsylvania  Archives,"  have  failed 
to  show  any  record  of  the  arrival  of  a  Christian  Kern  between  the 
years  1727  and  1800,  nor  of  a  Frederick  Kern  prior  to  1752. 

We  do,  however,  find  among  these  early  arrivals  several  of 
the  name  of  Kern,  who  were,  no  doubt,  closely  related  to  Frederick 
of  Rockhill  Township.  The  first  of  these  was  Nicholas  Carn,  or 
Kern,  who  was  probably  a  brother  and  came  over  in  the  ship 
Adventurer,  John  Davis,  Master,  sailing  from  Rotterdam  and  ar- 
riving in  Philadelphia,  where,  on  October  2,  1727,  the  adult  male 
passengers  appeared  before  the  Council  held  in  that  city  and  took 
the  oath  of  allegiance,  as  required,  to  the  King  of  Great  Britain. 
The  minutes  of  the  Provincial  Council  for  that  date  make  note 
that  a  "List  of  Fifty-three  Palatines,  who  with  their  Families,  mak- 
ing in  all  about  one  hundred  and  forty  Persons,  were  imported  in 
the  Ship  Adventurer,''  etc.  In  the  list  of  names  following  the 
above  entry  we  find  that  of  Nicholas  Crou.^  But  on  another  list 
of  these  same  passengers  recorded  as  arriving  on  this  same  ship  this 


1  Colonial  Records  of  Pennsylvania,  Vol.  Ill,  p.  288. 


258  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

name  appears  as  Nich*'  Coin/  According  to  the  history  of  the 
descendants  of  Nicholas  Kern,  this  was  the  date  and  the  name  of 
the  vessel  upon  which  he  came  to  this  country.^ 

Nicholas  Kern  and  family  settled  in  that  section  of  Bucks, 
which  eventually  became  a  part  of  Lehigh,  County,  and  they  were 
among  the  original  members  of  Egypt  Reformed  Church,'^  in  the 
latter  county.  Nicholas  died  in  1749,  leaving  a  widow,  Mar- 
garet, and  eight  children,  the  second  of  whom  was  named  Frederick, 
who  was  born  in  Europe,  1719,  and  died  in  Lehigh  County,  Pa., 
1790.  His  wife's  name  was  Catherine,  and  he  had  at  least  two 
children,  one  named  Frederick,  born  1765,  and  another  named 
John,  born  1772.  The  descendants  of  Nicholas  have  always  lived, 
for  the  most  part,  in  or  near  Slatington,  Lehigh  County.* 

The  histories  and  some  printed  genealogies  of  the  Kern  fam- 
ilies frequently  confuse  the  identity  of  these  two  Fredericks,  assum- 
ing them  to  be  the  same  person;  but  they  probably  bore  to  each 
other  the  relationship  of  uncle  and  nephew. 

Another  arrival  of  interest  is  that  of  John  Adam  Kern,  who 
was  a  passenger  on  the  ship  Royal  Union,  qualifying  as  a  citizen 
of  Pennsylvania,  August  15,  1750.^  He  lived  for  a  time  in  Phila- 
delphia, where  he  appears  the  following  year  on  the  records  of 
St.  Michael's  and  Zion  Lutheran  Church,  as  witness  at  the 
baptism  of  a  child  of  Jacob  and  Anna  Margaret  Nick.  He  was 
then  unmarried,  the  other  sponsor  being  Anna  Margaret  Reh.  On 
March  3,  1752,  "Adam  Kern  and  Anna  Maria  Zehlin  were  married 
in  the  evening  hour  of  prayer.'"'  They  had  the  following  children: 
Conrad,  born  December  19,  1752;  Jacob,  born  July  30,  1754, 
died  September  19,  1756;  Martin,  born  September  12,  1756,  died 
October  10,  1759;  Catherine,  born  March  1,  1759,  died  October 
18,  1759;  Adam,  born  August  20,  1760,  died  August  2,  1761. 
Anna  Maria,  wife  of  Adam  Kern,  died  August  6,   1764,  aged 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,   Second  Series,  Vol.  XVII,  p.   10. 

2  Charles  R.  Roberts,  Anniversary  History  of  Lehigh  Co.,  Pa.,  Vol.  II,  p.  630. 

3  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Sixth  Series,  Vol.  VI. 

^  Charles  R.  Roberts,  Anniversary  History  of  Lehigh  Co.,  Pa.,  Vol.  II,  p.  632. 
5  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Vol.  XVII,  p.  313. 
®  Records  of  St.  Michael's  and  Zion's  Lutheran  Church,  Philadelphia,  Pennsyl- 
vania. 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  259 

thirty-eight  years/  This  is  the  last  appearance  of  this  family 
upon  Philadelphia  records. 

These  same  church  records  show  that  a  Wilhelm  Frederich 
(or  Frederick),  Kern  and  wife,  Anna  Margaretha  Christina,  were 
sponsors  for  several  children  born  to  Johann  Albrecht  Hacken- 
miiller  and  wife,  Anna  Ottilia  Kern,  from  1752  to  1759. 

Jacob  Kern  and  wife,  Elizabeth,  were  also  members  of  this 
church,  as  on  April  24,  1755,  Jacob  Kern  and  Adam  Kern  were 
witnesses  to  the  marriage  of  Johann  Philip  Schmidt  and  Anna 
Elizabeth  Zehl[in],  who  was  no  doubt  sister  to  Anna  Maria,  who 
had  married  Adam  Kern  in  1751.  Jacob  and  Elizabeth  Kern  had 
issue:  Jacob  Jurg,  who  was  born  March  17,  1755;  Michael,  born 
May  30,  1757;  Johann  Philip,  born  August  16,  1762,  died  Sep- 
tember 7,  1762;  and  a  second  Johann  Philip,  born  May  13,  1764, 
and  died  August  22,  following.  The  baptismal  record  of  the  son 
Jacob  Jurg  reads:" 

"Jacob  Jurg  s.  Jacob  Kern  (New  Comer  from  Carlsruhe-bach  Dur- 
lach)  and  wife  Elizabeth  b.  March  17;  bap.  March  23,  1755.  sponsors — 
Jacob  Huber  and  Anna — Jurg  Huber  (single),  Elisabeth  Linden." 

The  evidence  points  to  the  supposition  that  Jacob  and  John 
Adam  were  brothers  or  closely  related,  and  were  probably  from  the 
same  place  in  the  old  country,  and  it  may  be  that  Wilhelm  Freder- 
ich Kern,  of  Philadelphia,  Nicholas  Kern,  of  Lehigh,  and  Freder- 
ick Kern,  of  Rockhill,  Bucks  County,  all  came  from  the  same 
locality  in  Germany  or  Switzerland. 

As  before  stated,  there  appears  to  be  no  record  of  the  arrival 
of  Frederick  Kern,  of  Rockhill,  and  his  family  in  America.  He 
and  his  wife,  Anna  Margaret,  were  members  of  Tohickon 
Reformed  Church,  in  that  township.  In  the  church-yard,  quite 
near  the  corner  of  the  original  church  building,  he  is  buried, 
together  with  his  son  Christian,  and  his  grandson  John  Adam 


1  Records  of  St.  Michael's  and  Zion's  Lutheran  Church,  Philadelphia,  Pennsyl- 
vania. 

-  Records  of  St.  Michael's  and  Zion's  Lutheran  Church,  Philadelphia,  Pennsyl- 
vania. 


260  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Kern.  It  is  from  the  church  books  of  old  Tohickon,  that  we 
find  practically  all  that  is  known,  at  the  present  writing,  concern- 
ing Frederick  and  his  children  and  grandchildren.  From  these 
records  of  baptisms,  confirmations,  tombstone  inscriptions,  etc., 
together  with  such  wills,  administration  accounts  and  deeds  as  can 
be  found,  it  was  possible  to  gather  the  following  data  concerning 
this  family. 

The  history  of  Lehigh  County  states  that  Frederick  Kern,  of 
Rockhill,  Bucks  County,  in  1748,  received  by  patent  from  the 
Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania  a  grant  of  a  tract  of  land  lying  in 
that  township,  upon  which  he  settled.^  As  a  matter  of  fact,  as 
proven  by  the  original  records  in  the  Land  Office  at  Harrisburg, 
this  grant  was  issued  by  three  patents,  under  date  of  May  4, 
May  14,  and  July  13,  1748,  to  Frederick  Kern,  son  of  Nicholas, 
and,  while  included  in  what  was  then  known  as  Bucks  County,^ 
this  land  now  lies  within  the  bounds  of  Lehigh  County.  It  is  not 
known  when  Frederick  Kern  settled  in  Rockhill,  nor  when,  nor 
from  whom  he  acquired  the  land  upon  which  he  resided  and 
which  he  mentions  in  his  will. 

The  earliest  record,  so  far  found,  appears  upon  Tohickon 
Baptismal  Register,  where,  we  learn,  John  Christian  Kern,  eldest 
son  of  Frederick,  with  his  wife,  Anna  Maria,  acted  as  w^itnesses 
to  the  baptism  of  two  children,  John  and  Christian,  sons  of  John 
and  Mary  Catherine  Bissert,  or  Rissert.  The  eldest  daughter  of 
Christian  and  Anna  Maria  Kern,  Anna  Elizabeth,  or  Liesbeth, 
was  baptized  July  15,  1750,  the  sponsors  being  John  Rissert  and 
wife  Anna  Liesbeth.  On  April  5,  1752,  Frederick  Kern  and  wife, 
Anna  Margaret,  had  a  daughter  baptized,  who  bore  the  name  of 
the  mother,  the  sponsors  being  the  parents.  Her  age  is  not  given, 
but  she  was  probably  the  youngest  child.  Then  on  Whitsunday, 
1756,  John  Peter  and  Helena,  children  of  Frederick  and  Anna 
Margaret  Kern,  were  confirmed;    and  on  November  29,   1757, 


1  Charles  R.  Roberts,  Anniversary  History  of  Lehigh  County,  Pa.,  Vol.  II,  p.  646. 

2  Patent  Book  H-69,  pp.  211,  212;  H-43,  p.  56.    Department  of  Internal  Affairs, 
Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania. 


c 

o 


o 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  261 

Philip  Peter  Lahr  (Lehr)  and  Magdalena  (Mary  Helena)  Kern 
were  married/ 

According  to  the  inscription  on  the  tombstone  marking  the 
grave  of  Christian  Kern,  he  was  born  November  11,  1726.  He 
was  the  eldest  of  the  five  children  of  Frederick  of  whom  we  have 
record. 

John  Peter,  second  son  of  Frederick  and  Anna  Margaret 
Kern,  was  born  July  23,  1741.  His  wife's  name  was  Catherine 
and  they  had  a  daughter,  Anna  Margaret,  baptized  March  5, 
1767.  John  Peter  died  June  3,  1820,  in  Rockhill  Township, 
leaving  ten  children.  His  wife  Catherine  died  November  3,  1815, 
in  her  70th  year. 

John  Adam  Kern,  the  third  son  of  Frederick  and  Anna 
Margaret  Kern,  born  August  29,  1750,  was  confirmed  May  13, 
1769.  He  married  November  23,  1773,  Catherine,  daughter  of 
Isaac  Hunsberger.  On  the  church  and  county  records  he  is  desig- 
nated as  John  Adam  Kern,  Senior,  as  he  had  both  a  son  and  a 
nephew  of  the  same  name.  He  died  October  10,  1830,  leaving  six 
children.  All  the  children  of  Christian,  John  Peter  and  John 
Adam,  Senior,  were  baptized  by  the  pastor  of  Tohickon  Reformed 
Church. 

Barbara,  daughter  of  Frederick  and  Anna  Margaret  Kern, 
married  Philip  Fluck.  Their  son.  Christian,  was  born  February  8, 
1757,  baptized  the  same  year,  the  godparents  being  Philip  and 
Barbara  Kern  Fluck."  There  is  strong  evidence  pointing  to  the 
supposition  that  the  wife  of  Christian  Kern  was  named  Fluck  and 
was  a  sister  of  Philip,  but  this  has  not  yet  been  proved.  The  same 
Christian  names  run  through  the  Fluck  and  the  Kern  families; 
the  two  burial  plots  lie  close  together  in  the  old  churchyard. 

Frederick  Kern  made  his  will,  dated  October  11,  1771.  In  it 
he  speaks  of  himself  as  "infirm."  To  his  "loving  wife,  Anna 
Margaretta,"  he  bequeathed  the  sum  of  £250,  a  piece  of  meadow 
land,  and  kitchen  and  bedroom  furniture,  and  all  the  "new  Linnens 
and  sheets."    He  directed  that  all  his  goods,  chattels  and  estates 


1  Records  of  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  Bucks  Co.,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Records  of  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  Bucks  Co.,  Pennsylvania. 


262  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

whatsoever  should  be  sold  at  public  auction  and  the  proceeds  there- 
from to  be  equally  divided  among  all  his  children,  naming  his  son 
Christian  as  executor.  Frederick  Kern  died  on  his  farm  in  Rock- 
hill  Township,  Bucks  County,  August  6,  1772.  His  will  for  some 
reason  was  proved  in  Philadelphia  instead  of  Doylestown,  the 
county  seat  of  Bucks  County,  on  September  12th,  five  weeks  after 
his  death. 

The  original  will,  the  inventory  and  account  are  all  on  file 
in  the  office  of  the  Register  of  Wills,  Philadelphia. 


Will  of  Frederick  Kern,  1772 

IN  THE  NAME  OF  GOD  amen  the  Eleventh  day  of  October  Anno 
Domini  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  seventy  one  I  Frederick  Kern 
of  the  Township  of  Rockhill  in  the  County  of  Bucks  and  province  of 
Pennsylvania,  yeoman,  being  infirm  but  of  Sound  Mind  and  Memory  do 
make  and  pubHsh  this  my  last  Will  and  Testament  in  manner  and  form 
following  (that  is  to  say)  Imprimis  I  commend  my  Soul  into  the  Hands 
of  Almighty  God  who  gave  it  and  my  Body  to  the  Earth  from  whence 
it  came  in  hopes  of  a  joyful  Resurrection  through  the  merits  of  my 
Saviour  Jesus  Christ  and  as  for  that  Worldly  Estate  wherewith  it  hath 
pleased  God  to  bless  me  I  dispose  thereof  as  follows  first  it  is  my  Will 
that  my  Lawful  debts  and  funeral  Expenses  shall  be  paid  out  of  my 
Estate.  Item  I  give  and  bequeath  to  my  loving  Wife  Anne  Margaretla 
the  sum  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  pounds,  also  one  cow  and  the  meadow 
which  I  reserved  for  myself  during  her  life,  also  two  Beds  with  all  the 
furniture  thereunto  belonging,  a  Chest,  a  Tea  Kettle,  a  Tin  Coffee  Pot, 
a  pewter  Tankard  Six  Pewter  plates  and  six  spoons,  one  pewter  Bason, 
and  Milk  pot,  one  small  Iron  pot,  one  frying  pan  an  a  small  pan,  a  grid- 
iron and  all  my  new  Linnens  and  sheets  and  four  good  sacks.  Item  all 
the  rest  and  residue  of  my  Goods,  Chattels,  and  Estates  whatsoever  I 
order  to  be  sold  by  public  sale  and  the  money  arising  by  the  sale  thereof 
I  give  and  order  to  be  Equally  divided  to  my  children  (to  wit)  my  sons, 
Christian,  Peter,  John  Adam,  and  daughters  Elizabeth,  Barbara,  Mary 
Jacobina  and  Mary  Helena  share  and  share  alike  And  I  nominate  and 
appoint  my  son  Christian  Kern  to  be  Executor  of  this  my  last  Will  and 
Testament,  and  Lastly  I  do  hereby  revoke  and  make  void  all  other  wills 
and  bequests  by  me  at  any  time  heretofore  made  and  declare  this  only  to 


•f. 


Jl 


c/; 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  263 

be  my  last  Will  and  Testament.     In  Witness  whereof  I  have  hereunto 
set  my  Hand  and  Seal  dated  the  day  and  year  first  above  written.^ 

Signed    Sealed    Published   and    de-  his 

dared  by  the  said  Frederick  Kern  frederick   X   Kern 

to  be  his  last  Will  and  Testament  mark 

in  the  presence  of  us  who  sub- 
scribed our  names  in  his  presence 
and  request. 

Ludwig  Benner 

Andrew  Benner 

The  will  was  admitted  for  probate  and  letters  were  issued  to 
his  son,  Christian  Kern,  September  12,  1772. 

The  inventory  and  appraisement  of  the  estate  was  made  Sep- 
tember 28th  by  his  son  Christian,  as  executor,  and  his  friends  and 
neighbors,  Jacob  Rolf  and  Abraham  Stout,  who  valued  the  same 
at  619  pounds  3  shillings  and  9  pence.  Following  is  the  form  of 
oath  and  affirmation  taken  by  the  appraisers : 

Do  you  Swear  that  you  will  Faithfully  Appraise  and  Value  the 
Goods  and  Chattels  Rights  and  Credits  Late  of  Frederick  Kern  of  the 
Township  of  Rock  Hill  in  the  County  of  Bucks  Deceased  and  a  True 
Inventory  thereof  make  as  Between  Buyer  and  Seller  according  to  the 
best  of  your  skill  and  Understanding  you  shall  not  over  or  Under  Esti- 
mate the  same  But  Impartially  Do  your  Duty  therein 

Jacob  Rolf 
Sworn  the  28  Day  of  September 
Anno  Dom  1772  Before  me 
John  Jemison 

Do  thou  Solemnly  Sincerely  and  Truly  Declare  and  Affirm  that  thou 
will  Faithfully  appraise  and  value  the  Goods  and  Chattels  Rights  and 
Credits  Late  of  Frederick  Kern  of  the  Township  of  Rock  Hill  in  the 
County  of  Bucks  Deceased  and  a  True  Inventory  thereof  Make  as 
Between  Buyer  and  Seller  according  to  the  best  of  thy  skill  and  Under- 
standing thou  shall  not  over  or  Under  Estimate  the  same  But  Impartially 
Do  thy  Duty  therein^  Abra  Stout 

Affirmed  the  28  Day  of  September 
Anno  Dom  1772  Before  Me 
John  Jemison 


1  Will  Book  P,  p.  300.     Philadelphia. 

2  Original  papers  194,  1772.    Register  of  Wills,  Philadelphia. 


264  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Inventory  and  Appraisement  of  the  Goods  and  Chattels  Rights 
and  Credits  Late  of  Frederick  Kern  of  Rock  Hill  in  the  County  of  Bucks 
Deceased  Taken  by  Christian  Kern  Executor  of  his  Last  Will  &  Testa- 
ment and  appraised  by  Jacob  Rode  and  Abraham  Stout  this  28*^  Day  of 
September  Anno  Domini  1772.^ 

£  s  d 

To   the   Deceaseds    Cloathes 6  14  9 

In  Cash '11  0  0 

To  a  Cloathes  press  20s  To  Seven  old  paggs  8s  6d.  .      1  8  6 

To  a  Large  Bible  and  other  Books 2  17  6 

To  two  Hatchels  and  a  Mortar  &  pestle 1  5  0 

To  old  Lumber 0  2  0 

To  a  stoave  50s  To  three  little  Caggs  3s 2  13  0 

To  pewter  plates  &  Spoons 0  18  8 

To  old  Lumber  2s  6d  to  an  Iron  pot  &  pann  9s  6d     0  12  0 

To  a  Box  Iron  3s  To  a  Candle  stick  Is  6d 0  4  6 

To  a  Brass  Kettle  7s  6d  to  an  Iron  Do  3s 0  10  6 

To  a  pitch  fork  and  other  old  Lumber 0  4  0 

To  a  spade  3s  6d  to  a  shovel  12  6d 0  5  0 

To  three  Hoes  3s  to  a  Whetting  pot   Is  6d  To  a 

Chest  10s 0  14  6 

To  a  Basket  Reedle  &  a  pair  of  Bellows 0  6  6 

To  a  pair  of  Tongs  and  Mason  Tools 0  6  0 

To  Six  Chairs  14s  to  an  Ax  2s  To  an  Iron  kettle  9s.      1  5  0 

To  an  old  Saddle  &  Bridle  7s  6d  to  a  stoave  30s 1  17  6 

To  two  Baskets  7s  6d  to  some  Beddings  10s 0  17  6 

To  Casks  and  Tubs 0  8  0 

To  a  Churn  5s  to  Casks  3s 0  8  0 

To  a  pot  rack  6s  to  a  Bake  Iron  4s 0  10  0 

To  Wash  Tubs  6s  To  a  half  Bushel  2s  6d 0  8  6 

To  a  Cow 3  15  0 

To  a  Note  of  John  Risset 9  9  0 

To  Bond  of  Ditto 20  3  0 

To  a  Note  of  Do 6  0  0 

To  a  Bond  of  Do  17  18  4 

To  a  Bond   of   Jacob   Rule 10  10  0 

To  another  Bond  of  Do 43  1  0 

To  another  Bond  of  Ditto 21  0  0 

To  a  Bond  of  Jacob  Rule 30  12  0 


1  Original  papers  194,  1772.     Register  of  Wills,  Philadelphia. 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  265 

To  a  Bond  William  Pannepecker 16  13        0 

To  another  Bond  of  W"*  Pannepecker 36  5        0 

To  a  Note  of  John  Kern 19  0        0 

To  a  Bond  of  Adam  Sheetz 10  10        0 

To  a  Bond  of  Simon  Smeeg  &  Philip  Fluke 105  0        0 

To  a  Bond  of  Ulrick  Stoller 15  6        0 

To  a  Bond  of  Mathias  Keens 10  10        0 

To  a  Bond  of  Jacob  Derflinger 26  16        0 

To  a  Note  of  Nicholas  Kornderffer 3  2         6 

To  a  Bond  of  Jacob  Krom  &  Henry  Ruth 51  0         0 

To  a  Bond  of  Jacob  Swartz  &  Jn°  Kemp 15  15         0 

To  a  Bond  of  Jacob  Shirmer 9  9        0 

To  a  Note  of  Philip  Smith 6  0        0 

To  a  Note  of  Mathias  Hartman 9  0        0 

To  a  Note  of  William  Hartman 9  0         0 

To  a  Note  of  Jacob  Krom 6  0        0 

Due  in  the  Book 

of  Christian  Kern 15  0        0 

of  Peter  Kern 50  0         0 

of  Philip  Flucke 9  0        0 

The  whole  Amounts  to  the  Sum  of £619  3         9 

Witness  our  Hand  the 
Day  aforesaid 
Jacob  Rolf 
Abra  Stout 

On  February  15,  1775,  Christian  Kern  filed  the  account  of 
his  administration  with  the  Register. 

Dr.  Cr. 

THE  Accompt  of  Christian  Kern  sole  Executor  of  the  last  Will 
and  Testament  of  Frederick  Kern  deceased  concerning  his 
Administration  of  the  said  Estate/ 

Imprimis                               £.  s.  d.         Item  £.  s.  d. 
The  said  Accomptant                          By  Cash  paid  for  Prov- 

charges  himself  with  all                          ing  the  Will 1       5     9 

and  singular  the  Goods  Ditto  paid  Witnesses  in 

and  Chattels,  Rights  and  coming  down   to   prove 

Credits     of     the     said                         d°    0      4    - 


1  Original  papers  194,  1772.     Register  of  Wills,  Philadelphia. 


266 


THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


Estate  as  per  Inventory 
thereof  exhibited  and 
Remaining  in  the  Reg- 
ister Generals  Office  at 
Philad^  amounting  to..  £619 


Ditto     paid     2     Ap- 
praisers      and       for 
Writing    the    Inven- 
tary  as  p  Receipts.  . .         0     10     0 
3     9     Ditto  paid  Jn°  Rissurt 

a  Debt  of  the  said  deed.      13     4 
By  Victuals  given  at  the 

Vendue -      8    6 

Ditto  paid  for  Mar- 
ble Head  &  Foot 
Stone  to  David  & 
W"   Chambers   as   p 

Receipt   2     11     2 

Ditto  paid  John  Hurst 

for  Rum  at  Vendue...     -     17     3 

Ditto   paid   Peter   Kern 

p  Rect  15      -    - 

Ditto    paid    W"i    Pan- 
nabecker  as  p  Receipt.  .     0     12     0 
Ditto  paid  Philip  Lam- 
bach  Vendue  Clerk  as  p 

do 0      6    0 

Ditto  paid  Henry  Roth 

aspd° 2     10     0 

Ditto  paid  Jacob  Sher- 
man as  p  d° -     15     5 

Ditto  paid   Peter   Stout 

Vendue  Cryer -     10    ~ 

Ditto  paid  Peter  ]\Iiller 

Esq  for  Writing  &c^  .  .     -     15     - 

Ditto     paid     Office 

Fees,     settling     this 

Accompt,  fair  Copy, 

Seal  and  a  Clerk.  ..  .  1       5     - 


By  Sundry  Articles 
bequeathed  to  the 
Widow  appraised  at. 
By — Allow^  made 
this   Accomptant    for 


£28     13     5 


4     15    2 


THE  KERN  FAMILY 


267 


what  the  Effects  sold 
for  less  than  ap- 
praised at 

By  an  Allow^  made 
this  Accomptant  for 
his  Care  and  Trouble 
in  the  Administration 
Ballance  on  this  Set- 
tlem*  to  be  disposed 
of  agreeable  to  the 
Will 


577      6    2 


£619      3    9 
Philad^  February  Examined  &  passed  Feb"^  15*^  1775 

15*^  1775  but    the    Interest    accrued    on    the 

Errors  Excepted  Bonds  in  the  Inventory,  which  re- 

Christian  Kern  mained  to  be  accounted  for  here- 

after. 

Benjamin  Chew  Reg^  Gen' 

William  Richards    | 

&  >   Issue  Capias  in  Case 

Daniel  Clark  ) 

£  s.  d. 

Buckwheat  in  y^  ground  appraised 18  0  0 

Indian  Corn  D° 57  0  0 

Winter  Grain • 112  10  0 

Turnips  &  Potatoes 15  0  0 

Amount 202  10  0 

Wheat— &  in  stock 65  0  0 

Rye   11  5  0 

Barley 7  0  0 

Oats    21  13  0 

Hay 67  10  0 

Flax  &  seed    —  10  0 

Swingled  Flax 2  0  U 

ap^  of  Linsey ^  0  0 


177 


18 


0 


268  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Frederick  Kern  was  buried  in  the  graveyard  adjoining  To- 
hickon  Church.  The  tombstone  marking  his  grave  bears  the  fol- 
lowing inscription: 

Friderich  Kern 
starb  den  6*^^"  August 

1772 
seines  Alters  75  Jahr. 

There  is  no  stone  marking  the  resting  place  of  Anna  Margaret, 
his  wife.    The  date  of  her  death  is  unknown. 

Children  of  Frederick  and  Anna  Margaret  Kern: 

1.  JOHN  CHRISTIAN   KERN,  born  November   11,   1726;  died 

February  24,  1801 ;  married  ANNA  MARY,  . 

2.  Anna  Barbara  Kern,  born   1725  or   1727;  died  May   19,   1800; 

married  Philip  Fluck,  born  1725,  died  1780;  buried  at  To- 
hickon  Reformed  Church.  These  stones  adjoin  those  of 
Christian  Kern  and  on  the  stone  of  Anna  Barbara  Fluckin 
her  birth  is  given  as  1726,  apparently  an  approximate  date, 
as  her  brother  Christian  wa.s  born  July  9,  1726,  her  birth 
evidently  occurred  the  year  before  or  following,  unless  they 
w^ere  twins. 

3.  Mary  Helena  Kern,  confirmed    1756;    married    November    29, 

1757,  Philip  Peter  Lehr;  member  of  Tohickon  Reformed 
Church. 

4.  John  Peter  Kern,  born  July  23,  1741 ;  confirmed  1756;  died  June 

3,  1820;  married  Catherine  ;  member  of  Tohickon 

Reformed  Church. 

5.  John  Adam  Kern,  born  August  29,   1750;  confirmed  May   13, 

1769;  died  October  10,  1830;  married  November  23,  1773, 
Catherine  Hunsberger;  members  of  Tohickon  Reformed 
Church ;  known  as  John  Adam  Kern,  Senior. 

6.  Mary  Jacobina  Kern. 

7.  Elizabeth  Kern. 

8.  Anna  Margaret  Kern,  baptized  April  5,  1752. 

JOHN  CHRISTIAN  KERN,  eldest  son  of  Frederick  and 
Anna  Margaret  Kern,  was  born  November  11,   1726,  and  died 


Frederick  Kern, 

Born  1697. 

Died  Aug.  6,  1772. 


ix^^S'Mt  (I-; 


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Christian  Kern, 
Born  Sept.  11,  1725. 
Died  Feb.  24,  ISOl. 
[Translation] 
Here 
Lies  the  body  of 
Christian  Kern 
Who  died  the 

24th  day  of  February,   1801. 
He  was  aged  75  years 
5  months  and  13  days. 


268  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Frederick  Kern  was  buried  in  the  graveyard  adjoining  To- 
hickon  Church.  The  tombstone  marking  his  grave  bears  the  fol- 
lowing inscription: 

Friderich  Kern 
starb  den  6'^"  August 

1772 
seines  Alters  75  Jahr. 

There  is  no  stone  marking  the  resting  place  of  Anna  Margaret, 
his  wife.    The  date  of  her  death  is  unknown. 

Children  of  Frederick  and  Anna  Margaret  Kern: 

1.  JOHN  CHRISTIAN   KERN,  born  November   11,   1726;  died 

February  24,  1801 ;  married  ANNA  MARY,  . 

2.  Anna  Barbara  Kern,  born  1725  or  1727;  died  May   19,  1800; 

married  Philip  Fluck,  born  1725,  died  1780;  buried  at  To- 
hickon  Reformed  Church.  These  stones  adjoin  those  of 
Christian  Kern  and  on  the  stone  of  Anna  Barbara  Fluckin 
her  birth  is  given  as  1726,  apparently  an  approximate  date, 
as  her  brother  Christian  was  born  July  9,  1726,  her  birth 
evidently  occurred  the  year  before  or  following,  unless  they 
were  twins. 

3.  Mary  Helena  Kern,  confirmed    1756;    married    November    29, 

1757,  Philip  Peter  Lehr;  member  of  Tohickon  Reformed 
Church. 

4.  John  Peter  Kern,  born  July  23,  1741 ;  confirmed  1756;  died  June 

3,  1820;  married  Catherine  ;  member  of  Tohickon 

Reformed  Church. 

5.  John  Adam  Kern,  born  August  29,   1750;  confirmed  May   13, 

1769;  died  October  10,  1830;  married  November  23,  1773, 
Catherine  Hunsberger;  members  of  Tohickon  Reformed 
Church ;  known  as  John  Adam  Kern,  Senior. 

6.  Mary  Jacobina  Kern. 

7.  Elizabeth  Kern. 

8.  Anna  Margaret  Kern,  baptized  April  5,  1752. 

JOHN  CHRISTIAN  KERN,  eldest  son  of  Frederick  and 
Anna  Margaret  Kern,  was  born  November  11,   1726,  and  died 


Frederick  Kern, 

Born  1697. 

Died  Aug.  6,  1772. 


:/:4* 


T 


Christian  Kern, 
Born  Sept.   11,  1725. 
Died  Feb.  24,  1801. 

Here 
Lies  the  body  of 
Christian  Kern 
Who  died  the 

24th  day  of  February,   1801. 
He  was  aged  75  years 
5  months  and  13  days. 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  269 

February  24,  1801/  He  probably  was  born  in  the  old  country 
and  accompanied  his  parents  to  Pennsylvania  while  still  a  youth. 
His  wife,  whom  he  married  before  November  30,  1749,  was  named 
Anna  Maria,  but  her  surname  is  unknown. 

As  before  stated,  the  first  record  we  have  concerning  this  Kern 
family  in  Pennsylvania  is  the  appearance  of  the  name  of  Christian 
Kern  and  wife,  Anna  Mary,  November  30,  1749,  as  witnesses  to 
the  baptism  of  John  and  Christian,  two  sons  of  John  and  Mary 
Catherine  Bissert  (Rissert).  On  July  15,  1750,  John  Rissert  and 
wife,  Anna  Liesbeth,  were  sponsors  for  Anna  Liesbeth,  daughter 
of  Christian  and  Anna  Maria  Kern.  April  5,  1752,  Christian 
Kern  and  Anna  Mary  had  a  second  daughter  baptized  by  name 
Anna  Margaret,  Frederick  Kern  and  wife,  the  grandparents,  being 
sponsors. 

Again,  on  "J^ly  7>  1754,  Christian  Kern  and  Anna  Mary 
Kern  brought  a  son  for  baptism.  Name  given,  John  Adam.  Wit- 
nesses were  John  Adam  Dani  (Thani)  and  wife,  Christina." 
February  27,  1757,  Christian  Kern  and  Anna  Mary  witnessed  the 
baptism  of  John  Christian,  son  of  Philip  and  Barbara  (Kern) 
Fluck. 

John  Jacob,  second  son  of  Christian  and  Anna  Mary  Kern, 
was  born  September  16,  1757,  and  baptized  November  6th  follow- 
ing. This  child,  John  Jacob,  died  August  1,  1758,  but  on  July  15, 
1759,  another  son  named  John  Jacob,  six  weeks  old,  was  presented 
for  baptism.  April  19,  1761,  a  son  named  John  Philip,  born 
March  26th,  was  baptized;  John  Philip  Fluck  and  wife  were  the 
godparents.  One  other  child  was  born  to  Christian  and  Anna 
Mary  Kern,  as  appears  from  these  church  records,  a  daughter 
named  Catherine,  born  March  27  and  baptized  May  3,  1767. 
Of  these  seven  children,  but  four  were  living  when  the  father  died 
in  1801.  John  Philip  Kern  died  May  7,  1791,'  in  his  thirty-first 
year,  leaving  a  wife,  Catherine,  and  three  small  children,^  one  of 
whom  was  Christian,  afterwards  of  Northampton  County.  Of 
John  Jacob  and  Anna  Liesbeth  there  is  no  further  record. 

On  April  10,  1755,  at  the  Supreme  Court  of  Pennsylvania, 


1  Tombstone  Inscription,  Tohickon  Reformed  Church. 

2  Records  of  Tohickon  Reformed  Church. 

3  Orphans'  Court  Docket  No.  2,  p.  203,    Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


270  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

in  pursuance  of  the  Act  of  Parliament  requiring  the  same,  Christian 
Kern,  of  Bucks  County,  was  naturalized.  He  took  the  oath  of 
allegiance  March  30,  1775/  Being  the  eldest  son,  he  was  made 
executor  of  the  will  of  his  father,  Frederick.  As  the  will  directed, 
the  real  estate  was  to  be  sold  and  the  proceeds  to  be  distributed 
among  the  four  heirs,  but  no  deed  concerning  this  is  on  record  at 
Doylestown  nor  Philadelphia. 

Christian  Kern  acquired  several  tracts  of  land  in  Hilltown 
and  Rockhill  Townships,  in  all  about  three  hundred  and  fifty  acres. 
One  tract  Christian  and  his  wife  and  Philip  Fluck  and  his  wife, 
January  1,  1775,  conveyed  to  Henry  Wismer,'  who,  with  his  wife, 
Barbara,  May  27,  1794,  sold  the  same  back  to  Christian  Kern. 

Deed:  Henry  Wismer  to  Christian  Kern,  1794 

Cf)i0  3n Denture  Made  the  twenty  seventh  day  of  May  in  the 
Year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety  four  Between 
Henry  Wismer  of  Hilltown  Township  in  the  County  of  Bucks  and  Com- 
monwealth of  Pennsylvania  yeoman,  &  Barbara  his  Wife  of  the  one  Part, 
and  Christian  Kern  of  the  same  place  Yeoman  of  the  other  Part.  Wit- 
nesseth  that  the  said  Henry  Wismer  and  Barbara  his  Wife,  for  and  in 
consideration  of  the  Sum  of  one  thousand  pounds  Current  Lawfull 
money  of  Pennsylvania  unto  them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  Christian 
Kern  at  and  before  the  sealing  and  Delivery  hereof,  the  receipt  whereof 
is  hereby  acknowledged  by  the  said  Henry  Wismer  &  Barbara  his  Wife, 
and  thereof  do  Acquit  &  forever  discharge  the  said  Christian  Kern  his 
Heirs  and  assigns  by  these  presents.  HAVE  granted,  Bargained,  Sold, 
Released  and  Confirmed,  and  by  these  presents,  DO  Grant,  bargain,  sell, 
Release  and  Confirm,  unto  the  said  Christian  Kern  his  Heirs  &  assigns, 
all  that  tract  or  Parcel  of  Land  Situate  in  Hilltown  aforesaid,  Beginning 
at  a  Stone  Set  for  a  Corner  in  Henry  Siple's  line  in  the  Middle  of  the 
great  Road  leading  to  Bethlehem  from  Philadelphia,  thence  along  the 
said  Road  by  lands  of  Lawrence  Cremer  &  Henry  Huber  North  six 
Degrees  East  one  hundred  &  Eighty  five  perches  to  a  Stone  thence  South 
Eighty  four  degrees  West  by  Adam  Kern's  land  twenty  four  perches  and 
three  tenths  to  a  Stone,  thence  by  said  land  North  forty  eight  degrees, 
west,  Eighty  perches  to  a  post,  thence  by  Hubert  Cassil's  and  Phillip 
Pluck's  lands,  South  forty  three  Degrees  West  one  hundred  and  thirty 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Vol.  II,  pp.  393,  394. 

2  Deed   Book  No.  23,  p.  203,  Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


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Deed — Christian  and  Mary  Kern  to  their  son,  John  Adam  Kern, 

May  26,  1794. 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  271 

perches  to  a  Stone,  thence  by  Valentine  Cremer's  and  s^  Siple's  lands. 
South  forty  eight  degrees  East  one  hundred  and  Ninety  Six  perches  to 
the  place  of  Beginning,  Containing  one  hundred  and  twenty  three  Acres 
and  one  hundred  and  thirty  perches  of  Land,  |  It  being  the  same  tract  or 
parcel  of  land  which  the  said  Phillip  Fluck  with  Barbara  his  Wife  &  the 
said  Christian  Kern  with  Mary  his  Wife,  by  their  Indenture  bearing  date 
the  thirty  first  day  of  January  A.D.,  1775  for  the  consideration  therein 
mentioned  did  Grant  &  confirm  unto  the  said  Henry  Wismer  his  Heirs 
and  Assigns  for  ever,  as  in  and  by  the  said  Indenture  recorded  in  the 
Office  for  recording  of  Deeds  in  the  County  of  Bucks  in  Deed  Book  No. 
23.  page  203.  &c.  relation  being  thereunto  had  may  more,  and  at  large 
Appear.  ****=;=*  IN  WITNESS  Whereof  the  Said  parties  to  these  pres- 
ents hereunto,  interchangeably  Set  their  hands  and  Seals  the  day  and  year 
first  above  written.^ 

Henry  Wismer 
Sealed  and  delivered  Barbara  Wismer 

In  the  presence  of  us 

Alex*"  Hughes 

James  Hughes 

Just  one  year  later,  May  26,  1795,  Christian  Kern  and  his 
wife,  Anna  Mary,  conveyed  one  hundred  and  one  acres  of  this 
tract  to  their  son,  John  Adam  Kern.  This  was  the  homestead  farm 
and  eventually  came  into  the  possession  of  Henry  H.  Stout,  son- 
in-law  of  the  latter. 

Deed:  Christian  Kern  and  Wife  to  Adam  Kern,  1795 

CI)i0  KnDCntUte  Made  the  Twenty  sixth  day  of  May  in  the  Year 
of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  &  Ninety  five  Between  Christian 
Kern  of  Hilltown  Township  in  the  County  of  Bucks  &  State  of  Penn- 
sylvania, Yeoman,  &  Mary  his  wife  of  the  one  part  And  their  son  Adam 
Kern  of  the  same  place.  Yeoman,  of  the  other  part  WITNESSETH  that 
the  said  Christian  Kern  &  Mary  his  wife  for  and  in  consideration  of  the 
Sum  of  Eight  hundred  &  nineteen  pounds  lawful  Money  of  Pennsylvania 
unto  them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  Adam  Kern  at  and  before  the  Sealing 
&  Delivery  hereof,  the  receipt  whereof  is  hereby  acknowledged  by  the 
said  Christian  Kern  &  Mary  his  Wife  ******  DO  grant.  Bargain,  Sell, 
Release  and  confirm  unto  the  said  Adam  Kern  his  Heirs  &  Assigns  all 


1  Deed  Book  27,  p.  446,  Doylestown,  Pa. 


272  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

that  tract  or  parcel  of  Land  Situate  in  Hilltown  Aforesaid  ******  Con- 
taining one  Hundred  &  one  acres  &  Seventy  perches  (more  or  less)  (and 
is  part  one  hundred  and  twenty  three  acres  &  one  hundred  &  thirty  perches 
of  land,  which  Henry  Wismer  &  Barbara  his  Wife  by  their  Indenture  of 
the  27^^  day  of  May  1794  for  the  Consideration  therein  Mentioned  did 
Grant  &  confirm  to  the  said  Christian  Kern  his  heirs  &  assigns  forever,  as 
in  and  by  the  said  Recited  Indenture  Recorded  on  the  Rolls  office  for  the 
County  of  Bucks  in  Deed  Book  N°  27,  page  446,  more  full  Appears). 
******  IN  WITNESS  Whereof  the  said  parties  to  these  presents  Have 
interchangeably  Set  their  Hands  and  Seals  the  day  &  year  first  Above 
written.^ 

Christian  Kern 
Sealed  &  delivered  her 

In  the  Presence  of  us  Mary  X  Kern 

Henry  Wissel  mark 

Alex'  Hughes 

One  other  property  of  Christian  Kern  is  of  especial  interest. 
It  is  that  known  as  the  Green  Tree  Tavern.  This  famous  inn  was 
kept  by  Christian  Kern  for  a  number  of  years.  It  is  situated  on 
the  Bethlehem  Pike  not  far  from  the  old  homestead  plantation. 
While  the  outward  appearance  of  the  building  has  been  greatly 
changed,  the  original  walls  are  the  same.  Christian  Kern  and  wife, 
Anna  Mary,  conveyed  to  their  son,  Philip,  this  tract  of  one  hundred 
and  thirty-five  acres,  including  the  inn,  March  29,  1786.^  Philip 
Kern  died  in  1791,  leaving  a  wife,  Catherine,  and  three  children, 
all  under  fourteen  years  of  age.  The  Orphans'  Court  at  Doyles- 
town,  May  7,  1804,  adjudged  this  property  to  Christian,  eldest  son 
of  Philip  and  Catherine.^  Christian  Kern,  Jr.,  removed  to  Ham- 
ilton Township,  Northampton  County,  Pennsylvania,  and  on  April 
2,  1805,  he  and  his  wife,  Catherine,  designated  as  of  the  latter 
place,  sold  this  entire  tract  to  Henry  Shellenberger.  The  two 
deeds  on  record  state  that  this  land  adjoined  that  of  Adam  Kern 
and  Henry  H.  Stout.* 


^  Deed  Book  No.  28,  p.  168.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 
'  Deed  Book  No.  26,  p.  139.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 
3  Orphans'  Court  Docket  No.  2,  p.  203.    Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 
*  Deed  Book  No.  Zl,  p.  180.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania.    Deed  Book  No.  38, 
p.  245. 


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Deed — John  Adam  and  Mary  Kern  to  their  son-in-law, 
Henry  Hartzell  Stout,  May  27,  1800. 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  273 

Christian  Kern,  Senior,  died  February  24,  1801,  aged  seventy- 
five  years,  three  months  and  thirteen  days,  and  was  buried  in  the 
graveyard  of  the  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  with  which  he  and 
his  family  were  so  long  associated.  No  tombstone  marks  the  last 
resting  place  of  his  wife,  Anna  Maria,  nor  is  it  known  when  she 
died,  although,  according  to  his  will,  she  was  living  at  the  time 
of  his  death.  On  the  tombstone  marking  his  grave  is  the  following 
inscription : 

Hier 

Ruhen  die  gebeine  von 

CHRISTIAN  KERN 

Welcher  gestarben  den 
24*^"  tag  Februari  1801 

Seines  alters  75  Jahr 

3  Monat  iind  13  tage. 

[Translation] 

Here 

Lies  the  body  of 

CHRISTIAN  KERN 

who  died  the 

24th  day  of  February,  1801 

aged  75  years 

3  months  and  13  days. 

His  will,  dated  April  5,  1800,  and  proved  April  1,  1801, 
named  as  executors  his  son,  John  Adam  Kern,  and  son-in-law, 
Henry  Hober  (Huber). 

Will  of  Christian  Kern,  1801 

IN  THE  NAME  OF  GOD  Amen  I  Christian  Kearn  of  the  Town- 
ship of  Hiltown  in  the  County  of  Bucks  being  weak  in  Body  but  of 
sound  and  perfect  mind  &  memry  Blessed  be  almightily  God  for  the  same 
do  make  and  publish  this  my  last  will  and  Testament  in  manner  Folowing 
That  is  to  say  First  I  give  and  Bequeath  unto  my  Beloved  wife  Mary 
Kearn  the  interest  of  seven  Flundred  pounds  to  be  paid  to  her  yearly  for 
her  suport  &  Mantainence  During  The  Term  of  her  natueral  Life  to- 


274  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

gether  with  the  use  of  the  House  I  now  live  in  &  the  gardin  I  now  hold 
with  quarter  of  an  acre  of  Land  yearly  for  her  flax  &  a  piece  of  ground 
for  potatoes  with  the  use  and  Benefit  of  Two  peices  of  medow  ground 
I  now  hold  with  two  Beds  &  furniture  thereto  Belonging  one  Iron  stove 
&  as  much  Household  Furniture  as  shall  be  necessary  for  her  use  and  a 
Cow  to  be  kept  for  her  in  summer  pasture  on  the  premises  I  now  live  on 
&  the  Previledge  of  stables  in  winter  fors'^  cow  and  her  fire  wood  to  be 
hald  home  yearly  all  yearly  anuites  my  said  widow  shall  have  During  the 
Term  of  her  natural  Life  also  I  Do  give  and  Bequeath  unto  my  three 
grand  children  the  Heirs  of  my  son  Philip  Kern  late  Deceased  the  sum 
of  one  Hundred  pounds  to  be  equally  Devided  amongst  them  shere  &  share 
alike  and  the  same  to  be  paid  to  them  in  one  year  after  my  Decease  and 
Further  it  is  my  will  &  I  do  order  that  my  executors  herein  after  Men- 
tioned shall  sell  the  remainder  of  my  estate  both  real  &  personal  as  soon 
as  convently  may  be  after  my  decease  and  the  money  therefrom  arising 
to  be  equally  Devided  amongst  my  children  that  is  to  say  my  son  Adam 
Kearn  my  daughter  Catherine  the  wife  of  Henry  Hober  &  her  heirs  my 
daughter  Margaret  the  wife  of  George  Shive  &  her  heirs  each  to  have 
equal  shares,  son  Adam  Kern  and  son-in-law  Henry  Hober  sole  executors.^ 
Dated  5th  of  April  1800.^ 

The  will  was  entered  for  probate  April  1,  1801,  an  inventory 
being  filed  the  same  day  and  an  account  rendered  August  3,  follow- 
ing. The  accomptants  showed  a  balance  of  $1,348.68  to  be  dis- 
tributed among  the  heirs. 

Inventory^ 

Inventory  of  the  Goods  &  Chattels  Rights  &  Credits  of  Christan 
Karn  of  Hillton  Township  Leate  Deceased  Taken  at  the  Request  of  the 
Executors  of  the  Last  Will  &  Testament  of  the  s*^  Kearn  by  us  the  under 
named  Appraisers  this  first  day  of  April  Anno  Dom  1801 

£     8.     d. 

To  a  Bed  Bedstade  &  Bedding 8      0    0 

To  a    Do        Do        &    Do      4      0    0 


1  Will  Book  No.  6,  p.  325.     Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  From  original  papers,  Register  of  Wills,  Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  275 

To  a  Ten  pleat  Stove 4  10  0 

To  a  Eight  day  Clock 6  10  0 

To  a  Table    0  10  0 

To  a  Dask  2  10  0 

To  a  Cloathes  press 1  10  0 

To  7  Chears    0  17  6 

To  2  Lookinglasses    0  7  6 

To  a  Lot  of  Tea  weare 0  5  0 

To  a  Number  of  Books 1  2  6    30-2-6 

To  a  Spining  Whell  &  Reel 0  10  0 

To  a  pear  of  Sceals 0  2  6 

To  a  Lot  of  Glass  Bottles  &  sunderys 0  5  0 

To  a  Bake  Iron 0  5  0 

To  2  pear  of  Tonges 0  6  0 

To  2  Ironpots   0  3  0 

To  2  pot  Racks 0  8  0 

To  3  Skilets    0  6  0 

To  4  Leadles  a  Frying  pann  &  Fleshfork 0  8  6 

To  a  Brass  Callander 0  7  6 

To  a  Coffee  mill  &  Funel 0  8  0 

To  3  Buckets  &  peal 0  7  6 

To  a  Lot  of  Delfe  &  pottor  wear 0  10  0 

To  a  Doz  of  Pewter  pleates  1  Doz  of  spoons  &  quart  1  10  0 

To  a  Tea  Kettle  3  Candlsticks  &  Candle  Mools 0  13  0 

To  a  Brass  Kettle 2  0  0    8-10-0 

To  a  sidesadle  &  Butter  Boxes 0  10  0 

To  a  quntity  of  Indin  Corn  sopoused  10  B 2  5  0 

To  a  Doughtrough  Chest  &  Wattering  pot 0  15  0 

To  10  Bages 0  15  0 

To  Basket  &  sundreys 0  2  0 

To  a  Number  of  Boxes  &  Caskes 0  15  0 

To  a  Dresser 0  15  0 

To  a  Iron  Kettle 1  0  0 

To  Mall  Rings  wages  &  ax 0  7  6 

To  2  Cowes 14  0  0    21-4-6 

The  above  Articles  Willed  &  Allowed  to 
the  Widows  use 

To  a  saddle  &  sadle  Bages 2  5  0 

To  a  Lanthorn  &  beehives 0  7  6 


276  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

To  a  pear  of  Sceals  &  a  Sythe  &  Creadle 0  10  0 

To  a  Riding  Chear  &  Harness 11  5  0 

To  Flax  Break  &  Tub 0  15  0 

To  a  Grindstone  0  7  6 

To  a  straw  Box  &  Knife 0  11  3 

To  25  B.  of  Buckwheat 4  7  0 

To  8  B.  of  Oatts 1  0  0 

To  a  Slyde  Chean  &  Treasses 0  7  6 

To  3  augors  2  Chissels  &  2  Drawing  Knives 0  10  0 

To  a  gun   0  7  6 

To  grain  in  the  ground 10  0  0  32-13-3 


To  cash  on  hand 148      8     0 

Abram  Hunsberry  &  Pr  Bond 50  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 2  10    0 52     10    0 

Abram  Anderhoh  Pr  Bond 60  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 3  0    0 63       0    0 

George  Wisel  Pr  Bond 28  2  6 

Interest  on  Do 1  7  10 29     10    4 

Henry  Jacoby  Pr  Bond 40  0  0 

Interest  on  Do .  .  , 1  12     0 41     12     0 

Frederick  Karn  Pr  Bond 15  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 0  15     0 15     15     0 

Peter  Karn  Pr  Bond 50  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 2  10     0 52     10    0 

Do— Per  Bond   60  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 3  0     0 63       0     0 

Do— Per  Bond    25  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 2  15     0 27     15     0 

Joseph  Hofford  per  Bond 112  0     0 112       0     0 

Joseph   Magle   Per  Bond 15  0    0 15       0    0 

To  a  bed  and  bed  stide  and  Sunderes 5       9     2 

Freadrick  Weaver  Pr  Note 4  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 0  5     6 4       5     6 

George  Shive  P--  Bond 150  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 7  10     0 157     10    0 

Henry  Schelenberry  per  Bond 43  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 2  2    6 45      2    6 

Do— p--  Bond 175  0  0 

Interest  on  Do 8  15     0 183     15     0 


(Jr""an   in  Tohickon   Church. 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  277 

Christian  Wickel  P"-  note 3       0     0 

Interest  on  Do 0     16    4 3     16    0 


993      9    8 


Appraised  by  us  the  subscribers  the  1st  day 
of  April     Anno  Dom     1801 


Samuel  Armstrong 
Henry  Weissel 


Children  of  Christian  and  Anna  Mary  Kern'^ 

1.  Anna  Liesbeth  Kern,  baptized    July    15,    1750;    probably    died 

young, 

2.  Anna  Margaret  Kern,  baptized  April  5,   1752 ;  married  George 

Shive,  or  Sheib.  Christian  anc^  wife  Anna  Mary  appear 
as  witnesses  at  the  baptism  of  several  children  of  George 
Sheib  and  wife. 

3.  JOHN  ADAM  KERN,  born  May  23,   1754;  baptized  July  7, 

1754;  died  November  16,  1821;  married  ANNA  MARIA 
,  born  October  4,  1756;  died  December  7,  1841. 

4.  John  Jacob  Kern,  born  September  16,  1757;  baptized  November 

6,  1757;  died  August  1,  1758. 

5.  John  Jacob  Kern,  born  May  28,  1759;  baptized  July  15,  1759. 

6.  John  Philip  Kern,  born  March  26,  1761 ;  baptized  April  19,  1761 ; 

died  May  5  or  6,  1791 ;  married  Catherine;  Issue:  Christian, 
who  removed  to  Hamilton  Township,  Northampton  County, 
Pennsylvania,  where  he  died;  Inherited  the  Green  Tree 
Tavern  tract  formerly  his  grandfather  Christian's;  John^ 
born  June  11,  1789;  and  Margaret. 

7.  Catherine  Kern,  born  March  27,   1767;  baptized  May  3,  1767; 

married  Henry  Huber.  The  records  of  Tohickon  Church 
show  that  several  children  were  born  to  Henry  and  Catherine 
Huber  or  Hufer.  Christian  Kern  in  his  will  named  his 
son-in-law  Henry  Hober  as  co-executor  with  John  Adam 
Kern. 

JOHN  ADAM  KERN,  eldest  son  of  Christian  Kern  and  his 
wife,  Anna  Mary,  was  born  in  Hilltown  Township,  Bucks  County, 


1  Records  of  Tohickon  Reformed  Church.    Will  Book  No.  6,  p.  325.    Doyle»- 
town,  Pennsylvania. 


278  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Pennsylvania,  May  23,  1754,  and  was  baptized  by  the  pastor  of 
Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  July  7th.  The  entry  on  the  church 
book  reads  thus: 

"1754,  July  7th,  Christian  Kern  and  Anna  Mary  brought  a  son  for 
baptism.  Name  given  John  Adam.  Witnesses  John  Adam  Dani  and 
Christina." 

The  date  of  his  birth  as  found  on  his  tombstone  was  May  23, 
1754;  he  was  therefore  just  about  six  weeks  old  when  he  received 
the  sacrament  of  baptism.  There  is  not  much  known  of  John  Adam 
Kern.  What  we  have  learned  has  been  gleaned  from  the  church 
books  and  other  original  sources.  We  find  him  as  a  young  man 
appearing  as  godfather  to  his  namesake  and  cousin,  John  Adam, 
who  was  born  March  31,  1768,  son  of  Philip  and  Barbara  Kern 
Fluck.  This  child  evidently  died,  for  on  July  4,  1773,  John  Adam 
Kern  again  appears  as  godparent  for  another  son  of  Philip  and 
Barbara  Fluck,  an  infant  two  weeks  old  and  also  named  John 
Adam.^ 

Neither  the  marriage  of  John  Adam  Kern  to  his  wife,  Anna 
Maria,  nor  the  baptism  of  any  of  their  children  is  recorded  at 
Tohickon  Church.  This  may  suggest  that  for  a  time  he  was  living 
in  another  part  of  the  county.  April,  1795,  two  daughters  of 
Adam  Kern,  Jr.,  were  confirmed:  Elizabeth,  the  elder,  was  sixteen, 
and  Catherine,  the  younger,  was  fifteen.  So  far  as  we  now  know, 
these  were  all  the  children  he  had.  Elizabeth  became  the  wife  of 
Henry  H.  Stout,  who  eventually  purchased  the  homestead  farm 
from  his  father-in-law.    Of  Catherine  there  is  no  further  record. 

On  June  20,  1781,  Christian  Kern  and  his  wife,  Anna  Mary, 
had  conveyed  to  their  son,  John  Adam  Kern,  two  contiguous  tracts 
of  land  in  Hilltown  Township,  containing  one  hundred  and  ten 
acres  and  seventy  perches,  which  were  in  turn  sold  by  the  latter 
and  his  wife  to  their  son-in-law,  Henry  H.  Stout,  on  May  27,  1800. 
This  was  the  old  homestead  farm  upon  which  had  resided  in  turn 
Christian  and  John  Adam  and  then  Henry  H.  Stout  and  wife, 
Elizabeth,  who  eventually  left  it  to  their  son,  Enos  Stout.^ 


1  Records  Tohickon  Reformed  Church,  Bucks  Co.,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Deed  Book  No.  31,  p.  130.    Doylestown,  Pennsylvania. 


JoHANX    Apam   Kern, 
Born   May  23,   1734. 
Died  Nov.  16,  1821. 

[Translation] 

Here 
rests  in  God 
Johaini  Adam  Kern 
who  wa?   born   the 
23rd  of  May  1734  and  died 
the   16th  November  1821,  having 
reached   the   age   of 

67  years   5   months   24   days. 


3.!--  -r-^^^.-.f^^B 

~  '■ 

S^BHIHHHBBBBiHBI 

Anna  Maria  Kern, 
Born  Jan.  11,  1756. 
Died  Dec.  7,  1841. 

[Translatio}i] 

Here 
rests  in  God 
Maria  Kern  she  was 
born   the   11th  of  January 

1756  and  died 
the  7th  December  1841 
Having  reached  the  age 
of  85  years   10  months 

and  2S  days. 


THE  KERN  FAMILY  279 

Deed.  May  27,  1800.  Between  John  Adam  Kern  of  Hilltown  Town- 
ship, Bucks  County,  Pennsylvania,  yeoman,  and  Mary  his  wife,  and  Henry 
H.  Stout  of  the  township  aforesaid,  sadler.  In  consideration  of  £1510, 
for  two  contiguous  tracts  of  land  situated  in  Hilltown  Township;  first- 
adjoining  Saucon  Road  and  land  of  Lawrence  Kremer  and  the  other  land 
said  John  Adam  Kern,  containing  fifty  one  acres,  Being  part  of  two  tracts 
of  land  containing  together  one  hundred  and  eleven  acres  and  one  hun- 
dred and  fifty  four  perches,  which  Christian  Kern  and  Mary  his  wife  by 
deed  June  20,  1781,  did  grant  and  confirm  unto  the  said  John  Adam  Kern 
(Deed  Book  No.  28,  p.  167)  and  the  other  tract  of  land  adjoining  lands 
of  Hubert  Cassel,  land  of  Christian  Fluck,  Valentine  Kramer,  other  land 
of  said  Christian  Kern,  the  Saucon  Road,  the  abovesaid  tract,  and  land 
of  heirs  of  Philip  Kern,  deceased,  containing  one  hundred  and  one  acres 
and  seventy  perches,  being  the  same  tract  of  land  which  Christian  Kern 
and  Mary  his  wife  by  deed  May  26,  1795,  granted  unto  said  (John) 
Adam  Kern  (Deed  Book  No.  28,  p.  168.) 

Adam  Kern 
her 

Mary  X  Kern 
mark 


It  is  possible  that  Catherine,  the  only  other  child  of  John 
Adam  Kern,  died  unmarried.  Nothing  further  is  known  of  John 
Adam  Kern  after  he  disposed  of  his  farm  to  his  daughter  Elizabeth 
and  her  husband.  He  died  November  16,  1821,  aged  sixty-seven 
years,  five  months  and  twenty-four  days,  and  was  buried  in  a  grave 
adjoining  that  of  his  father,  in  Tohickon  Churchyard.  His  wife, 
Anna  Maria,  lies  beside  him.  She  died  December  7,  1841,  aged 
eighty-five  years,  ten  months,  twenty-eight  days.  Two  stones  thus 
inscribed  mark  their  last  resting  place: 


Hier  Hier 

ruhet  in  gott  MARIA  KERN 

JOHANN  ADAM  KERN  sie   war  geboren   den    11    January 

er  war  geboren  den  23  May  1754  1756  und  ist  gestorben  den  7  decem- 

nist  gestorben  den  16  Nov*'  1821  er  ber   1841  und  bracht  ihr  alter  auf 

brachre   sein   aher   auf   67  Jahr  5  85  Jahr  10  Monat  und  28  tage. 
mon.  24  tage. 


280  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

[Translation]  [Translation] 

Here  Here 

rests  in  god  rests  in  god 

JOHANN  ADAM   KERN  MARIA  KERN 

who  was  born  May  23,  1754  who  was  born 

and  died  Nov.  16,  1821  Jan.  11,  1756  and 

aged  67  years  5  months  died  Dec.  7,  1841 

and  24  days.  aged  85  years  10  months 

and  28  days. 

John  Adam  Kern  left  no  will,  nor  were  any  letters  of  admin- 
istration talien  out  at  the  time  of  his  death.  This  leads  us  to 
conclude  that  he  left  but  the  one  child,  Elizabeth,  to  survive  him, 
and  having  made  over  to  her  and  her  husband  all  of  his  real  estate, 
he  and  his  wife  continued  to  reside  with  them  on  the  farm,  and  at 
their  deaths  the  daughter  Elizabeth  came  into  possession  of  any 
personal  property  they  may  have  left. 

Children  of  John  Adam  and  Anna  Maria  Kern: 

1.  ELIZABETH  KERN,  born  May  10,  1778;  died  June  5,  1871; 

married  May  8,  1798,  HENRY  HARTZELL  STOUT. 

2.  Catherine  Kern,  born  1779;  confirmed  1795,  aged  15  years. 

DESCENT  FROM  FREDERICK  KERN 
IX.     Frederick  Kern  married  Anna  Margaret . 


VIII.     John  Christian  Kern  married  Anna  Mary 
VII.     John  Adam  Kern  married  Anna  Maria 


VI.  EHzabeth  Kern  married  Henry  Hartzell  Stout. 

V.  Catherine  Stout  married  John  Andrew  Strassburger. 

IV.  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  married  EHzabeth  Schwenk. 

III.  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Mary  Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


Bible  belonging-  to  Catharine  Stout  Strassburger 


The  SCHWENK  FAMILY 

HANS  MICHAEL  SCHWENCK  was  born  in  Germany 
March  11,  1696,  and  came  to  America  in  the  ship  Jamaica 
Galley,  Robert  Harrison,  Commander,  which  sailed  from 
Rotterdam,  arriving  at  Philadelphia  February  9,  1739." 

There  were  three  hundred  and  twenty  passengers,  but  only  the 
names  of  males  over  sixteen  years  of  age,  eighty-nine  in  number, 
are  given,  the  other  two  hundred  and  thirty-one  being  women  and 
children.  On  the  official  list  of  the  Commonwealth  of  Pennsyl- 
vania we  find  the  names  of  "Hans  Michael  Swinck"  and  "Adam 
Schwinck,"^  but  on  the  original  list,  as  made  up  by  the  authorities 
at  Rotterdam  before  sailing,  we  find  that  "Michael  Swenk,"  was 
fifty  years  of  age,  and  "Adam  Swenk"  was  eighteen  years  old.  Ac- 
companying him  were  his  wife,  Mary  Elizabeth,  and  his  three  sons, 
Jacob,  George  and  Nicholas.^  It  is  possible  that  Adam  was  a  son, 
who,  being  over  sixteen  years  of  age,  was  registered,  while  the  other 
three  were  under  that  age.  The  earlier  generations  spelled  the 
name  "Schwenck"  but  the  later  ones  dropped  the  second  "c"  and  it 
then  became  "Schwenk." 

Very  little  is  known  of  Michael  Schwenck.  On  April  16,  1747, 
he  bought  of  David  Heebener  and  his  wife,  Mary,  a  tract  of  one 
hundred  acres  of  land  in  Frederick  Township,  then  in  Philadelphia, 
but  now  Montgomery  County.  The  Old  Goshenhoppen  Creek  ran 
through  the  eastern  end  of  this  land.  January  2,  1752,  Michael 
Schwenck  and  Mary,  his  wife,  conveyed  this  farm  to  their  son, 
George  Schwenck.  The  above-mentioned  deed  to  Michael  Schwenck 
is  not  recorded,  the  recital  of  this  transfer  being  found  in  a  deed 
from  George  Schwenck  and  his  wife,  Fronica,  to  Henry  Boyer,  of 
this  same  farm,  some  twenty  years  later.^ 


1 1.  D.  Rupp,  Thirty  Thousand  Names,  p.  131.  Names  of  Foreigners  who  took 
the  oath  of  Allegiance,  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Vol.  XVII,  pp. 
179,  183. 

2  From    Records   in  possession   of   Enos    Schwenk,   Schwenkville,   Pennslyvania. 

2  Deed  Book  No.  13,  p.  185.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


282  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Deed:  George  Swink  et  al  to  Henry  Boyer,  1782 

C^f)i0  3(n Denture  made  the  seventh  day  of  April  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  eighty-two  Between  George  Swink, 
Charles  Bower  and  Elizabeth  Bower  (Executors  of  the  last  Will  and 
Testament  of  Paul  Bower,  late  of  Frederick  Township  in  the  County  of 
Philadelphia  and  State  of  Pennsylvania,  cooper,  deceased,  bearing  date 
the  fourth  day  of  February,  1782,  (recorded  in  Register's  ofifice,  Phila- 
delphia) of  the  one  part  and  Henry  Boyer  of  Limerick  Township,  in  the 
said  County  of  Philadelphia,  millwright,  of  the  other  part. 

WHEREAS  John  Penn,  Thomas  Penn  and  Richard  Penn,  Esquires, 
true  and  absolute  proprietors  and  governors  in  chief  of  Pennsylvania, 
by  their  patent  bearing  date  the  twentieth  day  of  May,  1736,  did  grant 
and  convey  unto  David  Hiebner,  a  certain  tract  of  land  situate  in  the  said 
township  of  Frederick,  Beginning  at  a  corner  post  near  the  old  Cusse- 
hopen  Creek  on  the  east  side  thereof,  thence  by  land  now  of  David  Grove 
and  William  Boyer  southwest  one  hundred  and  thirty  perches  to  a  post, 
thence  by  land  of  George  Boyer  and  Jacob  Boyer,  northwest  one  hundred 
and  twenty-four  perches  to  a  post,  thence  by  land  of  Henry  Boyer  and 
Jacob  Undercufifer  northeast  one  hundred  and  thirty-seven  perches  to  a 
post,  thence  by  land  of  said  Jacob  Undercuffer  and  George  Shill  south- 
east one  hundred  and  twenty-four  perches  to  the  place  of  beginning  CON- 
TAINING one  hundred  acres  of  land  *  *  *  and  the  said  David  Hiebner 
and  Mary  his  wife  by  their  Indenture  of  lease  and  release  dated  the  fif- 
teenth and  sixteenth  days  of  April,  Anno  Dom.  1747,  for  the  consideration 
therein  mentioned  did  grant  and  confirm  the  said  one  hundred  acres  and 
allowance  unto  Michael  Swenk  in  fee  and  the  said  Michael  Swenk  and 
Mary  his  wife  by  their  Indenture  dated  the  second  day  of  January  Anno 
Dom  1754,  did  grant  and  confirm  the  said  one  hundred  acres  and  allow- 
ance to  George  Swenck  in  fee  AND  George  Swenck  and  Fronica  his  wife 
by  their  Indenture  dated  the  fourth  day  of  April,  1761,  did  grant  and 
confirm  the  said  one  hundred  acres  to  Henry  Boyer  in  fee,  and  the  said 
Henry  Boyer  and  Magdalena  his  wife  by  their  Indenture  dated  June  7, 
A.D.  1776,  did  grant  and  confirm  the  said  one  hundred  acres  to  Yost 
HoUibush  and  the  said  Yost  Hollibush  and  Mary  Elizabeth  his  wife  by 
their  Indenture  dated  the  fourteenth  day  of  October,  A.D.,  1778,  con- 
firmed the  same  unto  the  above  named  Paul  Bowers  w'ho  by  virtue  of  the 
above  recited  will  impowered  the  above  named  Executors  to  sell  the  above 
described  one  hundred  acres  of  land  at  Public  Vendue. 

NOW^  THIS  INDENTURE  WITNESSETH  that  the  said  George 
Swenck,  Charles  Bower  and  Elizabeth  Bower  for  and  in  consideration  of 
the  sum  of  four  hundred  and  fifty-four  pounds  *  *  have  granted,  bar- 
gained and  sold,  conveyed  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Henry  Boyer  all 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  283 

the  above  described  one  hundred  acres.  *  *  In  Witness  whereof  the  said 
parties  to  these  presents  have  interchangeably  set  their  hands  and  seals 
the  day  and  year  first  above  written. 

George  Swink 
Charles  Bower 
her 
Elizabeth    X    Bower 
mark 

On  June  1,  1749,  Christopher  Saur,  publisher  of  the  German- 
town  newspaper,  the  Pennsylvaniche  Brietesche,  inserted  this 
notice  in  the  issue  of  that  date : 

"The  Printer  has  a  letter  for  Michael  Schwenck,  in  Schipback."^ 

Michael  Schwenck  and  his  wife  were  members  of  the  old 
Goshenhoppen  Lutheran  Church,  situated  in  Upper  Salford  Town- 
ship. Goshenhoppen  was  a  Union  Church,  erected  and  owned  by 
the  Lutherans  and  Reformed  jointly.  In  1732  a  tract  of  land  was 
procured  from  the  Proprietaries  of  the  Commonwealth  for  the 
purpose  of  building  a  church,  and  in  the  fall  of  that  year  a  school- 
house  was  erected  which  was  used  as  a  place  of  worship.  But  the 
tract  was  not  properly  surveyed  until  January  26,  1737.  Then 
thirty-eight  and  one-half  acres  were  set  aside  for  the  use  of  the 
church  and  school,  the  deed  being  recorded  in  Philadelphia  the 
following  month. 

As  they  were  without  a  pastor,  the  Reformed  and  the  Lutherans 
worshipped  together,  occupying  the  schoolhouse  as  a  church  up  to 
the  spring  of  1744,  when  the  two  congregations  began  the  building 
of  the  first  church,  the  corner-stone  being  laid  on  May  14  of  that 
year,  the  members  doing  much  of  the  work  themselves. 

On  a  large  stone  over  the  entrance  was  inscribed  in  German 
"The  united  liberality  of  the  Lutherans  and  Reformed  erected  this 
temple."  The  whole  congregation  consisted  of  about  forty-five 
families. 

This  venerable  old  church  stood  till  1858,  when  the  two  con- 
gregations resolved  to  build  a  larger  stone  edifice  with  a  steeple 


Henry  S.  Dotterer,  The  Perkiomen  Region,  Volume  III,  p.  35. 


284  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

and  bell,  the  present  church  being  the  result  of  these  later  en- 
deavors/ 

On  May  8,  1757,  Michael  Schwenck  and  Maria  (Mary),  his 
wife,  were  sponsors  (by  proxy)  for  their  grandson,  Daniel,  son  of 
Nicholas  and  Anna  Barbara  Schwenck,  who  was  baptized  by  the 
minister  of  the  Goshenhoppen  Lutheran  Congregation." 

Michael  Schwenck  died  February  20,  1773,  aged  seventy-one 
years,  eleven  months  and  nine  days.  His  wife  died  July  4,  1775, 
aged  seventy  years,  nine  months,  less  five  days."  They  were  both 
probably  buried  in  the  churchyard  adjoining  the  church.  There 
is  no  will  on  record  nor  were  any  letters  of  administration  issued 
at  the  time  of  his  death. 

Children  of  Hans  Michael  and  Mary  Elisabeth  Schivenck: 

1.  Jacob  Schwenck,  born  in  Germany,  1725;  came  to  Pennsylvania 

with  his  parents  in  1739  and  was  naturalized  at  a  session 
of  the  Supreme  Court  at  Philadelphia  April  14,  1754.^ 

2.  GEORGE  SCHWENCK,  born  in  Germany,  March,  1728;  died 

in  Montgomery  County,  Pennsylvania,  February  24,  1803 ; 
married  VERONICA  MARKLEY. 

3.  Nicholas  Schwenck,  born  in  Germany;  came  to  Pennsylvania  in 

1739;  died  1808;  married  Anna  Barbara  ;  he  was  a 

blacksmith  and  resided  in  Harleysville,  Pennsylvania. 

GEORGE  SCHWENCK,  son  of  Hans  Michael  and  Mary 
Elizabeth  Schwenck,  was  born  in  Germany  March,  1728,  and  came 
to  America  with  his  parents  in  1739,  when  eleven  years  of  age. 
He  married,  April  30,  1751,  Veronica  (Fronica),  daughter  of 
Major  Jacob  and  Barbara  Dotterer  Markley.  She  was  born  April  1, 
1732,  confirmed  in  Augustus  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church,  Trappe, 
Pennsylvania,  April  7,  1751,  three  weeks  before  her  marriage.* 

George  Schwenck  was  a  farmer  and  blacksmith,  and  resided 
in  what  is  now  Frederick,  but  then  Perkiomen  Township,  Mont- 


1  Abraham    H.    Cassel,    The    SchivcnkviUc    Item,    July    15,    1879.     Genealogical 
Notes,  Volume  X,  p.  202. 

-  Old    Goshenhoppen    Lutheran    Church    Records.     Perkiomen    Region,    Volume 
III,  p.  36. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,   Second   Series,   Volume  II,  p.  301. 

■*  Augustus    Evangelical    Lutheran    Church,    Trappe,    Pennsylvania.     Records    in 
possession  of  The  Genealogical  Society  of  Pennsylvania. 


fcjO 
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THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  285 

gomery  County.    He  was  naturalized  September  24,  1755,  having 
taken  the  Sacrament  the  day  previous/ 

The  census  of  1756  for  Perkiomen  Township  shows  that: 
"George  Schwenck  had  two  children,  one  hundred  acres  of  land, 

of  which  forty  were 
cleared."  In  1769  he 
was  assessor  for  Fred- 
erick Township  of  the 
proprietary  tax,  he 
himself  being  taxed 
£15  18s  4d  on  two  hundred  acres,  three  horses  and  five  cattle; 
1774  rated  £16  Is  4d  for  provincial  tax  on  two  hundred  acres, 
three  horses  and  five  horned  cattle;  1776,  appears  on  the 
township  assessment  as  owner  of  two  hundred  acres,  three  horses 
and  five  cows;  1779,  collector  for  Frederick  Township  of  the 
supply  tax  for  that  year,  his  tax  being  £16.' 

The  first  roads  from  one  new  settlement  to  another  were  simply 
paths  through  the  forest,  leading  over  private  property.  As  com- 
munities grew,  the  need  for  public  roads  was  recognized  and  peti- 
tions were  accordingly  addressed  to  the  Court  of  Quarter  Sessions, 
praying  that  such  highways  be  laid  out  for  public  use.  Such  a  peti- 
tion was  made  to  the  Court  held  at  Philadelphia  on  the  first  Monday 
of  September,  1763,  for  a  road  leading  from  George  Weickert's 
tavern,''  in  Frederick  Township,  to  "John  Bargen's  mill,  on  Perkyo- 
men  Creek"  (later  Henry  Vanderslice's  mill)  and  thence  to  Gosh- 
enhoppen  Church.    Among  the  signers  were:* 

George  Weichert  Killian  Gangler 

Heinrich  Beyer  Daniel  Hister 

Johannes  Niss  Vallentine  Nungessor 

Jost  Holbousch  Heinrich  Krauss 

Wendel  Horst  John  Miller 

Johan  Peter  Holbusch  Michael  Renn 

Christian  Hepler  George  Schwenck 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Volume  II,  pp.  382,  383,  395. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Third  Series,  Volume  XIV,  pp.  48,  49,  587 ;  Volume 
XV,  pp.  24,  25 ;  Volume  XVI,  pp.  165,  550. 

3  Weickert's  Tavern  was  located  in  what  is  now  Zieglerville,  at  the  point 
where  the  Perkiomen  and  Sumneytown  turnpikes  diverge.  It  was  later  occupied 
by  Andrew  Ziegler,  Jr. 

*  Theodore  W.  Bean,  History  of  Montgomery  County,  Pa.,  p.  844. 


286  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

At  a  general  term  of  the  same  Court  of  Quarter  Sessions,  1775, 
George  Schwenck  was  made  Supervisor,  or  Overseer  of  the  High- 
ways, for  Frederick  Township/ 

Besides  following  his  trade  as  a  blacksmith,  George  Schwenck 
owned  a  large  tract  of  land,  which  he  farmed.  This  land  lay  for 
the  most  part  in  Frederick  Township.  The  first  purchase  of  which 
we  have  any  record  was  for  one  hundred  acres  in  the  above-named 
township,  located  principally  on  the  west  side  of  old  Goshenhoppen 
Creek,  which  he  secured  of  his  father  and  mother,  Michael  and 
Mary  Elizabeth  Schwenck,  January  2,  1754.  On  April  4,  1761, 
George  and  his  wife,  Fronica  (Veronica),  sold  this  tract  to  Henry 
Boyer."  October  28,  1765,  he  bought  of  David  Heebner  two 
hundred  acres  also  in  Frederick  Township,  which  adjoined  "other 
lands  of  said  George  Schwenck,"  but  on  May  2,  1768,  he  sold  one 
hundred  and  forty-six  acres  and  one  hundred  and  twenty-six 
perches  of  this  last-named  tract  to  Ludowick  Reimer.^  The  "other 
land"  referred  to  was,  no  doubt,  the  homestead  tract,  the  deed  for 
which  is  not  recorded  at  either  Philadelphia  or  Norristown. 

Deed,  dated  May  2,  1768.  Between  George  Swink  of  Frederick  Town- 
ship, Montgomery  County,  Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania,  blacksmith, 
and  Fronica,  his  wife,  and  Ludowick  Reimer  of  same  place,  yeoman.  In 
consideration  of  £550.  6s.  3d.  for  a  certain  tenement,  plantation  and  tract 
of  land  situate  in  Frederick  Township,  aforesaid,  adjoining  other  lands 
of  the  said  George  Swink  and  land  of  Lodowick  Reimer,  containing  one 
hundred  and  forty-six  acres  and  one  hundred  and  twenty-six  perches, 
being  part  of  two  hundred  acres  of  land  which  John  Johnson  of  German- 
town,  sadler,  and  Agnes  his  wife,  by  deed  of  Release,  March  5,  1745/6, 
did  grant  and  confirm  and  release  unto  David  Hibner  of  Frederick  Town- 
ship and  the  said  David  Hibner  and  Mary  his  wife  by  deed  October  8, 
1765,  did  grant  and  confirm  all  the  above  two  hundred  acres  of  land  to 
the  said  George  Swink. 

George  Swink 
Fronica  .Swink 

It  appears  by  another  indenture  under  date  of  March  27,  1771, 
that  George  Schwenck,  with  his  brother,  Nicholas,  had  purchased, 


1  Theodore  W.  Bean,  History  of  Montgomery  County,  Pa.,  p.  838.     Manuscript 
Notes  of  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  Volume  XVI,  p.  241. 

2  Deed  Book  No.  13,  p.  185.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 

3  Deed  Book  No.    8,  p.  370.    Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


George    Sen  wen  k, 

Born   1728. 

Died  Feb.  24.  1803. 

[Traiislatioii] 

Here  lies  the 

body  of  the  deceased 

Georg  Schwenk 

Who  was  born  in  the  year 

1728  in   Mcrtz 

and   died   the   24th    day 

February   in    the   year    1803 

Having  reached  the  age  of 

75  years. 


K(1XIC.\      Al.AKKLEY      ScHWENK, 

Born    Apr.    1,    1732. 

Died    Oct.   2,    1777. 

[Translation] 

In  Memory  of 

Fronica 

Wife   of 

George    Schwenk 

Born  the  1st  April   1732, 

Died  the  2nd  Oct.   1777. 

Aged  45  years  6  months 

and  1  day 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  287 

in  1769,  a  small  plantation  of  about  forty  acres  lying  in  Gwynedd 
Township,  Montgomery  County.  This  tract  "George  Swenk  of 
Frederick  Township,  blacksmith,  and  Fronica  his  wife  and 
Nicholas  Swenk  of  Lower  Salford  Township,  blacksmith,  and 
Barbara  his  wife"  sold  to  Nicholas  Charles  for  two  hundred 
pounds. 

Deed:  Nicholas  Swenck  et  al  to  Nicholas  Charles,  1771 

Ci)i$  3n Dentil te  made  the  twenty-seventh  day  of  March  in  the 
year  of  our  Lord  One  thousand  seven  hundred  and  seventy-one,  Between 
Nicholas  Swenck  of  Lower  Salford  Township,  Montgomery  County, 
Province  of  Pennsylvania,  blacksmith,  and  Barbara  his  wife,  and  George 
Swenck  of  Frederick  township,  in  the  said  County  and  Province,  black- 
smith, and  Fronica  his  wife,  of  the  one  part,  and  Nicholas  Charles  of 
Gwynedd  Township  in  the  county  and  Province  aforesaid,  baker,  of  the 
other  part.  Whereas  in  and  by  a  certain  Indenture  dated  April  29,  1769, 
made  between  William  Swenck  of  Gwynedd  Township  aforesaid,  black- 
smith, and  Mary  his  wife,  of  the  one  part,  and  the  said  Nicholas  Swenck 
and  George  Swenck  of  the  other  part,  he  the  said  William  Swenck  and 
Mary  his  wife  for  and  in  consideration  therein  mentioned  did  grant  and 
confirm  unto  the  said  Nicholas  Swenck  and  George  Swenck  a  certain  small 
plantation  or  tract  of  land  situated  in  the  Township  of  Gwynedd,  contain- 
ing 40  acres  and  26  perches.  Now  this  Indenture  witnesseth  that  the 
said  Nicholas  Swenck  and  Barbara  his  wife,  and  George  Swenck  and 
Fronica  his  wife,  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  £200  have  granted  bar- 
gained, sold  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  Nicholas  Charles  all  that  tract, 
plantation  and  parcel  of  land  situate  in  Gwynedd  Township  aforesaid, 
*  *  *.  In  witness  whereof  the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have  inter- 
changeably set  their  hands  and  seals  thereunto  dated  the  day  and  year  first 
above  written.^ 

Nich^  Swenck 
Sealed  and  delivered  in  the  her 

presence  of  us  Barbara    X    Swenck 

Fred'^  Antes  mark 

Catherine  Shuler  George  Swenck 

her 

Fronica   X    Swenck 

mark 


^  Deed  Book  No.  4,  p.  231.    Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


288  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Still  one  other  deed  of  interest  is  on  record.  George  Schwenck, 
on  May  27,  1795,  purchased  of  his  sons,  John  and  George 
Schwenck,  Jr.,  as  executors  of  the  estate  of  Henry  Krauss,  Jr., 
four  tracts  of  land  lying  in  Frederick  Township,  belonging  to  the 
heirs  of  Henry  Krauss.  Three  days  later.  May  30,  George 
Schwenck,  Sr.,  conveyed  these  tracts  to  his  son,  John,  who  at  the 
time  was  living  in  Upper  Hanover  Township.  In  this  deed  George 
Schwenck  is  noted  as  "widower,"  his  wife,  Fronica,  having  died  in 
1777,  almost  twenty  years  before. 

Deed:  George  Schwenck  to  John  Schwenck,  1795 

C^J)i$  3ilnD0ntUt0  Made  the  thirtieth  day  of  May  in  the  year  of 
our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety  five  Between  George 
Schwenck  of  Frederick  Township  in  the  County  of  Montgomery  and 
State  of  Pennsylvania,  Widower,  of  the  one  part,  and  his  son  John 
Schwenck  of  Upper  Hanover  Township  in  the  county  of  Montgomery 
and  State  of  Pennsylvania,  aforesaid,  blacksmith,  of  the  other  part. 
WITNESSETH  that  the  said  George  Schwenck  for  and  in  consideration 
of  the  sum  of  Fourteen  hundred  and  fifteen  pounds  *  *  Have  granted, 
bargained,  sold,  released  and  confirmed  unto  the  said  John  Schwenck 
his  heirs  and  assigns  A  certain  Messuage,  Tenement  and  four  tracts  of 
land  situate  in  Frederick  Township  aforesaid.  The  first  of  them  adjoin- 
ing Swamp  Creek,  land  of  Baltus  Fonts,  George  Swineherd,  Michael 
Krous,  containing  fifty  acres  of  land  *  *  *  The  second  of  them  adjoin- 
ing to  Joseph  Groff's  land,  land  of  George  Peter  Herp,  Hans  George 
Swineherd,  John  Budd,  containing  fifty  acres;  the  third  of  them  adjoin- 
ing Swamp  Creek,  lands  of  John  IMiller,  Henry  Mitchel,  Limerick  Town- 
ship line  and  Henry  Krous'  land,  containing  sixty  and  one-half  acres. 
And  the  fourth  of  them  adjoining  lands  of  Hans  Meiller,  the  Great  Road 
leading  from  Falkoner  Swamp,  land  of  Baltzer  Heidrich,  containing  six 
and  one  half  acres,  it  being  the  same  four  tracts  which  Henry  Krauss, 
Senior,  and  Anna  Maria  his  wife,  June  26,  1775,  granted  to  their  son 
Henry  Krauss,  deceased,  and  the  said  Henry  Kraus  by  his  last  will  and 
testament,  dated  July  12,  1794,  directed  the  same  should  be  sold  by  his 
executors  the  said  John  Schwenck  and  George  Schwenck  (the  younger) 
and  the  said  John  Schwenck  and  George  Schwenck  (the  younger)  by  deed 
May  27th  last  did  grant  and  confirm  the  same  unto  the  said  George 
Schwenck  party  hereto.^ 


1  Deed  Book  No.  17,  p.  86.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  289 

The  marriage  of  "George  Schwenck  and  Veronica  Mercklin," 
daughter  of  Jacob  Merklin  (Markley),  April  30,  1751,  is  found 
recorded  on  the  Register  of  Augustus  Evangelical  Church  or  "Old 
Trappe,"  as  it  is  commonly  called,  in  Upper  Providence  Township, 
Montgomery  County,  and  here  we  also  find  the  baptism  of  "Daniel, 
son  of  George  and  Veronica  Schwenck,  born  May  9,  baptized  Au- 
gust 9,  1761 ;  sponsors  the  parents."  Among  the  members  of  this 
congregation,  who  promise  to  contribute  to  the  salary  of  the  Rev- 
erend Pastor  Muhlenberg,  November  27,  1760,  it  is  noted  that 
"George  Schwenck  promises  to  pay  7s  6d  yearly,"  while  his  father- 
in-law,  Jacob  Merckle,  contributes  15s  as  his  subscription/ 

The  original  building  of  the  Augustus  Lutheran  Church, 
Trappe,  was  erected  in  1743,  and  is  still  standing,  having  been  used 
since  the  erection  of  the  new  edifice,  1853,  for  the  Sunday  school. 
Providence  Township  was  formed  out  of  Perkiomen  or  Bebbers 
Township  in  1729,  the  division  of  Upper  and  Lower  Providence 
not  taking  place  until  1809.  About  1733  the  Lutherans  of  Provi- 
dence organized,  John  Christian  Shultz  being  the  first  pastor.  He, 
however,  served  them  but  one  year,  and  was  then  followed  by  John 
Caspar  Stoever,  who  remained  in  charge  of  the  congregation  until 
1742,  when  the  Rev.  Henry  Melchior  Muhlenberg  was  called  to 
the  pastorate,  and  the  following  year,  1743,  the  church  building 
was  commenced.  Rev.  Dr.  Muhlenberg  continued  in  the  ministry 
of  the  church  until  his  death,  1787,  and  was  buried  in  the  graveyard 
adjoining.^ 

George  and  Fronica  Schwenck  lived  at  first  in  what  is  now 
Zieglerville,  opposite  the  old  home  of  Andrew  Ziegler,  Junior.  He 
sold  this  property  and  removed  to  a  new  and  more  pretentious  house 
which  he  had  built  on  the  north  branch  of  the  Perkiomen  Creek, 
about  three-fourths  of  a  mile  southwest  of  the  Borough  of 
Schwenkville,  where  he  plied  his  trade  as  blacksmith,  making  and 
repairing  tools  for  the  company  who  opened  and  operated  the 
copper  mine  nearby.  He  planted  a  buttonwood  tree  by  the  side  of 
his  shop  for  a  shade  tree,  which,  despite  the  fact  that  it  was  struck 


1  Records  of  Augustus  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church,  Trappe,  Pa. 

2  Theodore  W.  Bean,  History  of  Montgomery  County,  pp.   1058,  1059. 


290  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

by  lightning  in  1911,  is  still  in  a  flourishing  condition,  measuring 
sixteen  feet  in  circumference  at  its  base/ 

George  Schwenck  died  February  24,  1803,  aged  seventy-five 
years;  his  wife,  Fronica,  October,  1777,  in  her  forty-sixth  year. 
Both  are  buried  in  the  private  burying  ground  on  the  home- 
stead farm.  The  farm  has  long  since  passed  out  of  the  possession 
of  the  Schwenck  family.  This  little  cemetery,  the  resting  place  of 
a  dozen  or  more  of  the  children,  grandchildren  and  great-grand- 
children of  George  and  Fronica  Schwenck,  now  lies  in  the  midst  of 
the  plowed  fields,  and,  to  save  it  from  destruction  by  the  dis- 
interested owner,  the  Schwenk  Family  Association  purchased  the 
tiny  plot  and  thus  secured  its  perpetual  protection.  The  tombstone 
marking  the  grave  of  Fronica  had  broken  and  fallen,  the  inscrip- 
tion being  almost  obliterated.  The  association  set  up  a  new  stone, 
as  shown  in  the  photographs,  leaving  the  old  one  lying  flat  upon 
the  grave. 

On  the  old  Goshenhoppen  Church  record  is  found:  "Veronica, 
George  Schwenck's  wife,  died  29th  September,  1777." 

In  the  manuscript  record  of  deaths  in  the  Markley  family 
occurs  this:  "1803,  25  Feb.:  old  George  Schwenck  died.'" 

Letters  of  administration  on  the  estate  of  George  Schwenck, 
deceased,  were  granted  March  21,  1803,  to  his  two  sons,  Jacob  and 
Abraham. 

An  inventory  and  appraisement  of  his  personal  estate  was 
made  by  Samuel  Pennepacker  and  Abraham  Groff,  and  the 
amount  found  to  be  £1468. 8. 3><.  Among  his  effects  was  a  sermon 
book,  appraised  7s  6d,  and  a  large  German  Bible.^  The  where- 
abouts of  this  Bible  is  unknown.  It  is  probably  in  the  possession 
of  one  of  his  descendants,  but  it  was  not  located  in  time  to  be  used 
in  compiling  this  record  of  the  family. 

Inventory 

A  Just  and  true  Inventory  and  Conscinable  Appraisement  of  the 
Personal  Estate  of  George  Schwenck  late  of  Frederick  Township  in  the 


1  Manuscript  History  of  the  Schwenk  Family,  by  the  late  Enos  S.  Schwenk,  of 
Schwenkville,  Pa. 

2  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  The  Doitcrcr  Family,  p.  94. 

3  Original    Papers    No.    15961,    Register    of    Wills.     Norristown,    Pa.     Original 
papers  in  possession  of  Mr.  Albert  Schwenk,  Schwenkville,  Pa. 


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THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  291 

County  of  Montg-omery  deceased  of  what  came  to  our  Hands  best  to  our 
Skill  and  knowledge  Appraised  by  us  this  26*^  day  of  March  A.  D.  1803. 

Samuel  Pennebecker 
Abraham  Groff 

To  two  Coats   £2 

To  one  ditto    1 

To  a  great  Coat  —     1     6 

To  a  coat  &  vest —    3  — 

To  three  Vests   1     5  — 

To  Blish  Breeches   —    6  — 

To  nankeen  Vest  &  breeches —    2     6 

To  Six  Pair  of  trowsers,   —  10  — 

To  three  Pair  of  lincy  trowsers —  10     3 

To  2  vests  6^^  five  pair  stockings  8/6 —    9 

To  2  pair  Mittons  1/6  flannel  vest  1/ —    2     6 

To  3  pair  trowsers,   —    4  — 

To  15  Shirts  2 

To  a  pair  of  Boots  2/6      3  pair  Shoes  7 /(i —  10  — 

To  3   hats    —     5  — 

To  2  Silk  Handkerchiefs —     5  — 

To  2  Shirts  9/6    2  bocket  Handkfs  2/6 —  12  — 

To  13   Sheets    4    7    6 

To  5  table  Cloaths 1     2    6 

To  7  towels  7/         5  yards   linnen   25/ 1   12  — 

To  1  sheet  15/        3  bedcases  15/ 1  10  — 

I'o  1  bolster  case  3/9      2  biller  cases  3/9 —    7    6 

To  6  billow  cases  9/6      6  Pewter  spoons  2/ —  11     6 

To  basket  with  lumber  1/6      Dressor  30/ Ill     6 

To  1  boddle  &  1  hane  8/6  rasor  4/ —  12    6 

To  a    Cloath's    bress 2 

To  a  Hatchet  1/       lookinglass  1/ —    2  — 

To  sheepshears  2/6     fowling  Peace  20/ 1     2     6 

To  round  table  7/6    Brass  Kittle  25/ 1  12    6 

To  tripping  pan  6^^     Cappage  tub  &c*  5/9 —    6    3 

To  a  Ceeder  tub  2/     Churn  &cM/ _    3_ 

To  Cask  2/     Spate  1/     Shovel  1/  keg  6-^  tabel  2/ —    6    6 

To  half  barrel  1/     House  Clock  £7.10 7  11  — 

To  a  Crosscutsaw  7/6      a  Saddle  15/ 1     2    6 

To  2  barrels  2/     Half  bushel  3/9 —    5     9 

To  a  bed  with  bedstead. 1   15  — 

To  a  bed  with  bedstead 10 


292  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

To  a  small  brass  Kittle n 

To  Spinning  wheel  7/6    a  Chair  2/ _     9 

To  a  large  wheel  2/    a  bell  6*^    basket  2/ _    4 

To  a  water  pot  9^    Couch  1/6 2 

To  Shovel  &  tongs,   2 

To  a  basket  Candlestick  &c^ 3 

To  timber  Chain  3/9     2  axes     1  Hatchet  3/9 _     7 

To  a  hoe  1/    tung  forks  /9 j 

To  Pinchers  &  hammer  2/6 2 

To  2  augers  &  Drawing  knife 2 

To  Mauld  &  Cooper  tongs 3 

To  2  shovels  2/    a  Saw  7 /(i 9 

I'o  an  ats  1/6    a  Bellows  2/6 _    4 

To  a  jack  5/    a  five  plate  Stove  7/6 _  12 

To  a  lookinglass   2 

To  bed  Curtains  2  

To  a  Silk  Cap 2 

To  a  Blanket  15/    Coverled  20/ '  "  .\  j   15 

To  3^  yards  Velvet  j   jj 

To    a  pair  Saddle  bags 3 

To  an  Arm  Chair 3 

To  3  Chairs  7/6     1  Bible  11/3 ..."  __  jg 

To  a   Sermon   book 7 

To  5  books  5/6    2  gallon  kegs  2/6 _    g 

To  a  Brass  Cullender 4 

To  a  Candlestick  &  Snuffers _     2 

To  Brass  Bowl  2 

To  a  Brass  tea  Kittle 5 

To  a  funnel  &  grator 

To  Coffee  Mill  1/3    to  lamp  1/ .'.'....'..."..".  —    2 

To  a  Pewter  tea  Pot  &  Shoe  Brush __     1 

To  a  Rasp  1/     1  Swarm  bees  30/ 1   jj 

To  a  ten  plate  Stove 4  jq 

To  2  Iron  Pots ii 

To  a  Hog,  dd -, 

To  an  Iron  Kittle j  c 

To  old  Pans  &  Old  pot '.  .  —    2 

To  a  wafel  iron 7 

To  all  the  Pewter  dishes j   jg 

To  15  Pewter  Plates .  "  .  ^  '  "  1   17 

To  one  Pewter  Quart  &  one  Pewter  Pint _     2 

To  6   Plates    _     2 


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THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  293 

To  2  Boddles  &  a  Snuff  box —    2     6 

To  boddle  1/    one  Pint  6V 1/ —    2    6 

To  a  Sugar  box  2/     Bowl  1/ —     3  — 

To  Salt  box  6^    tin  6^1 —     1  — 

To  glass  &  grater  11^     Specktacles  1/ —     111 

To  2  Potracks  butter  Print  &=^ —     8     6 

To  Money  Burse   9 

To  Michael    Gouglers   book   acct 4     2     6 

To  Peter  Swaner  ditto —  15  — 

To  Daniel  Schwencks  ditto 400 

To  Cash  in  the  House 18  18     3^^ 

To  Am*  of  Bonds  &  Notes,  965     4    8 

To  Samuel  Bertolet  5  14  — 

John  Schwenck  rec'd  of  his  father, £325     7     6 

Jacob  Schwenck     ditto    475     5  — 

Abraham  Schwenck    ditto 311 

Daniel  Schwenck    ditto 443 

John  Markley     ditto   137     3     6 


1741  16  — 

Amount  of  Bond  &  Notes 965     4    8 

Am*  of  Book  acc*^ 4  17    6 

Am*  due  by  Daniel  Schwenck  on  plan 400 

Am*  of  Cash  in  the  house 18  18     3>4 

Am'^  of  Personal  Estate  to  be  sold, 7Z  13  10 


3204  10    3>4 

The  administrators  filed  their  final  account  May,  1805.  No- 
tices advertising  the  filing  were  put  up  at  Henry  Krebs',  at  Philip 
Bower's  and  at  Samuel  Bower's,  three  of  the  most  frequented 
public  houses  in  the  neighborhood.  The  settlement  showed  a  net 
balance  of  £3134.11.6^  for  distribution  among  the  heirs. ^ 

Orphans'  Court.  May  Term,  1805.  The  report  of  Jacob  Schwenck 
and  Abraham  Schwenck  administrators  of  George  Schwenck,  deceased. 
Setting  forth  that  they  had  made  a  settlement  in  the  register's  office 
which  was  produced  to  the  court  stating  a  balance  of  £3134.  11.  6^  due 
the  Estate  and  upon  proof  being  made  of  due  notice  being  given  accord- 
ing to  law,  the  said  report  was  confirmed  by  the  Court. 


1  Orphans'    Court    Docket    No.    2.    p.    126.     Norristown,    Pennsylvania.     From 
Original  Papers  in  possession  of   Mr.  Albert  Schwenk,   Schwenkville,   Pa. 


294  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Settlement  of  the  Estate  of  George  Schwenck.  The  accompts  of 
Jacob  Schwenck  and  Abraham  Schwenck,  administrators  to  the  estate 
of  George  Schwenck,  late  of  Frederick  Township  in  the  County  of  Mont- 
gomery, deceased. 

The    accomptants    charge    themselves     with     the 
Amount  of  Inventory  duly  proved  and  remaining  in  the 

Register's  Office  of  Montgomery  County,   £3204.  10.     3 J/2 

To  advance  of  sales, , 16.  1 1.     9 

To  interest  on  the  monies  in  hands  of  administrators.  ...         19.  18.     3 

£3241.     0.     3y2 

To  additional  interest  received  by  administrators 10.  14. 

3521.  14.     3>4 

To  balance  due  the  estate, £3134.  11.     6^ 

Passd  and  Subscribed  Feby  12*^^  1805. 


<?<. 


The  disbursements  amounted  to  £117  2s  9d.  Among  the  items 
appear:  "By  commission  agreed  on  by  the  major  part  of  the  Heirs 
and  their  representatives  to  wit  Jacob  Schwenck  £18.14.9^,  and 
Abraham  Schwenck  £56.4.4.4^." 

The  following  releases  were  found  among  the  original  papers, 
pertaining  to  this  estate.  They  are  interesting  and  therefore  in- 
serted : 

September  28*^^    1803.     Received  of   Abraham   Shwink  one  of  the 
Adm^'s  of  the  estate  of  George  Shwink  Deceased  the  Sum  of  Twelve  Dol- 
lars and  Tenn  Cent  for  Grave  Stones,  Rec'^ 
By  me,  Alexander  Ramsey. 

Received  November  27^^   1804  of  Abraham  Schwenck  one  of  the 
Administrators  to  the  Estate  of  George  Schwenck  deceased  the  Sum  of 
seven  Dollars  in  full  for  a  Coufin  for  said  deceased 
£2-12-6  George  Boyer 


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///, 


Old  form  of  diplomatic  passport  issued  by  Secretary  of  State 
Brvan  on  the  15th  of  April,  1913. 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  295 

Received  May  the  9'^  1803  of  Abraham  Swank  an  administrator  of 
the  Estate  of  george  Swank  the  Sum  of  four  Pound  Six  ShilHng  and  one 
Pence  haulf  Peny  in  full  for  Wine  Rum  Shucker  and  Coffi 
By  me  Benedick  John 

£4:  6:  1.^ 

Received  February  3"^  1805  of  Abraham  Schwenck  one  of  the  Admin- 
istrators to  the  Estate  of  George  Schwenck  deceased  Six  shillings  &  three 
pence  for  setling  and  stating  the  Ex"^  ace'  &c 
^/^  BenjN  Markley 

Received  November  28'^  1805  of  Abraham  Schwenck  Co  Adminis- 
trator to  the  Estate  of  our  father  George  Schwenck  deceased  the  Sum  of 
thirty  eight  Pounds  Eleven  Shillings  and  Six  pence  three  farthings  which 
together  with  what  I  had  received  of  my  father  in  his  life  time  and  the 
Monies  I  have  received  of  said  Abraham  Schwenck  and  amount  bought 
at  Vendue  &c'^  is  in  full  my  Divident  due  me  out  of  my  fathers  Estate 
Including  my  Commission  as  Administrator  and  all  accounts  relative  the 
said  deceaseds  Estate,  and  the  said  Abraham  Schwenck  doth  fully  Dis- 
charge me  from  all  further  trouble  and  Expence  that  shall  or  may  be  by 
reason  of  the  said  Administration,  Witness  my  hand 
Witness  present  Jacob  Schwenck 

Benjn  Markley 

Rc^  Dec"^  3^  1805  of  abraham  Swenk  administrator  of  the  Estate  of 
George  Swenk  Decease'^  the  Sum  of  Six  Hundred  &  Twenty  Six  pounds 
ten  Shillings  &  five  pence  in  full  of  my  Wifes  portion  out  of  Said  Estate 
£262:  10:  5  JnO  Markley 

The  Estate  o.f  George  Swenk  D"^ 

To  John  Hahn 
For  Medicine  &  attendance  $1. — 

May  18th  1303 

Received  payment  in  full  of  Abraham  Swenk  Administrator  to  the 
above  Estate  John  Hahn 

Received  January  25'^  1804  of  Abraham  Schwenck  one  of  the  Admin- 
istrators to  the  Estate  of  George  Schwenck  deceased  one  Pound  twelve 
shillings  in  full  of  my  ace*  against  said  deceased. 
£1 :  12:  —  BenjN  Markley 


296  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Children  of  George  Schzvenck  and  Fronica  Markley: 

1.  John   Schwenck,    born    in    Frederick     Township,    Montgomery 

County,  Pennsylvania,  March  5,  1752;  died  February  3, 
1803;  married  September  4,  1773,  Regina  Krause,  born 
April  12,  1756;  both  buried  in  the  Schwenk  private  burial 
ground. 

2.  Jacob   Schwenck,   born  June  7,    1755,   in   Frederick   Township, 

Montgomery  County,  Pennsylvania ;  died  July  29,  1825 ; 
married  Eva  Maria  Beirly;  resided  in  Gwynedd  Township, 
Montgomery  County,  Pennsylvania. 

3.  ABRAHAM  SCHWENCK,  born  in  Frederick  Township,  Mont- 

gomery County,  Pennsylvania,  May  24,  1759;  died  August 
6,  1843;  married  FRONICA  BAUER. 

4.  Daniel  Schwenck,  born  May  5,  1761 ;  married  1st,  Catherine  Roud- 

enbush,  2nd,  Catherine  Boyer. 

5.  Elizabeth   Schwenck,    born   December   31,    1766;   married   John 

Markley. 

ABRAHAM  SCHWENCK,  son  of  George  Schwenck  and 
Veronica  Markley,  was  born  in  Frederick  Township,  Montgomery 
County,  Pennsylvania,  May  24,  1759.  He  served  an  apprentice- 
ship in  Germantown,  where  he  learned  the  trade  of  tanner.  Henry 
S.  Dotterer,  in  his  history  of  the  Perkiomen  Region,  gives  the 
following  incident,  as  occurring  during  the  Revolutionary  War.^ 

"Abraham  Schwenck  was  a  tanner  in  Germantown  at  the 
time  of  the  war.  Was  nineteen  years  old,  tall,  fine  man  and  was 
under  age,  but  because  of  his  size  the  officers  did  not  know  it. 
At  the  Battle  of  Germantown  he  went  upstairs  in  a  house  as  he 
was  wounded;  a  woman  said  that  British  were  coming;  he  said, 
'Let  the  devils  come,'  and  he  took  a  large  stick  from  the  fireplace 
and  drove  them  back." 

About  the  year  1779  he  married  Fronica,  daughter  of  Michael 
Bauer  and  Veronica  Landis,  who  was  born  April  10,  1756.  They 
took  up  their  residence  at  a  place  now  called  Claytonville,  but 
later  bought  a  large  farm  in  Frederick  Township  at  what  is  now 
Delphi,  or  Zieglerville  Station.  He  built  a  tannery  there  and 
carried  on  farming  and  tanning  until  1808,  when  he  gave  this 
place  to  his  son,  John.     In  1784  he  bought  six  acres  in  Frederick 


1  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  History  of  the  Perkiomen  Region.    Vol.  II,  p.  87. 


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THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  297 

Township,  which  he,  with  his  wife,  Fronica,  sold  in  1791  to 
Christopher  Streecker  for  £33.  This  six  acres  was  part  of  the 
Perkiomen  copper  mine  tract  which  had  been  sold  at  public  auction, 
1773,  by  the  trustees  of  the  company.^ 

Jacob  Fuchs  and  Anna  Maria,  his  wife,  by  deed  dated  April 
13,  1804,  conveyed  one  hundred  and  fifty  acres  to  Abraham 
Schwenck,  Sr.,  and  Daniel  Schwenck,  his  brother;  and  April  1, 
1805,  Abraham  Schwenck  and  wife,  Fronica,  and  Daniel  Schwenck 
and  his  wife,  Catherine,  transferred  this  land,  which  lay  in  Lim- 
erick Township,  to  Henry  Adams. 

Deed  :  Abraham  and  Daniel  Schwenck  to  Henry  Adams,  1805 

C^f)i0  3(n Denture  made  the  first  day  of  April  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  five  Between  Abraham  Schwenck 
of  Frederick  Township  in  the  county  of  Montgomery  and  State  of 
Pennsylvania,  Farmer,  and  Fronica  his  wife,  and  Daniel  Schwenck  of 
Frederick  Township  aforesaid,  yeoman,  and  Catherine  his  wife,  all  of 
the  one  part,  and  Henry  Adams  of  Limerick  Township,  County  and  State 
aforesaid,  yeoman,  of  the  other  part,  WHEREAS  John  Heebner  and 
Mary  his  wife  by  their  Indenture  bearing  date  the  eighteenth  day  of 
March,  1794,  did  grant  and  confirm  unto  Jacob  Fuchs  *  *  *  a 
certain  tract  of  land  situate  in  the  Township  of  Limerick  aforesaid, 
containing  one  hundred  and  fifty  acres  *  *  *  and  WHEREAS 
the  said  Jacob  Fuchs  and  Anna  Maria  his  wife,  by  deed  dated  April 
13,  1804,  did  grant  and  confirm  one  hundred  and  forty-two  acres 
and  eighty  perches,  part  of  the  above  mentioned  land  unto  Abraham 
Schwenck  and  Daniel  Schwenck  parties  hereto  *  *  NOW  THIS 
INDENTURE  WITNESSETH  that  the  said  Abraham  Schwenck  and 
Fronica  his  wife  and  Daniel  Schwenck  and  Catherine  his  wife  for  and  in 
consideration  of  the  sum  of  one  thousand  pounds  *  *  have  granted, 
bargained,  sold,  aliened,  enfoefifed,  released  and  confirmed  unto  the  said 
Henry  Adams  and  to  his  heirs  and  assigns,  ALL  THAT  messuage  and 
tract  of  land  situate  in  Limerick  Township  aforesaid,  bounded  by  road 
leading  to  Pottstown,  land  of  Jacob  Crouse,  Michael  Dotter,  Junior,  Peter 
Henrick,  Jacobs  Fuchs  and  John  Richards  and  the  line  dividing  New 
Hanover  from  Limerick  Township,  containing  one  hundred  and  forty 
two  acres  and  eighty  perches.     It  being  the  above  recited  one  hundred 


1  Deed  Book  No.  51,  p.  537.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


298  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

and  fortv-two  acres  and  eighty  perches  of  land  *  *  In  Witness  whereof 
the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have  hereunto  interchangeably  set  their 
hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year  first  above  written.^ 

Abraham  Schwenck 

her 
Fronica    X    Schwenck 

mark 
Daniel  Schwenck 
Catherine  Schwenck 

On  August  6,  1807,  Abraham  Schwenck  purchased  a  farm 
of  one  hundred  and  forty  acres  in  Skippack  TowTiship  of  John 
Dehaven  for  the  sum  of  $5133.33  1-3,  it  being  the  old  homestead 
of  Joseph  Fowling.  He  afterwards  purchased  an  additional  thirty- 
six  acres  of  Henry  Keely's  land  adjoining.  Here  he  resided  until 
his  death.  This  farm  lay  on  the  Perkiomen  Creek  opposite 
Schw^nksville  and  very  close  to  the  Pennypacker  Mills,  the  Revolu- 
tionary Company  ground.  There  w^as  no  bridge  across  the  creek 
in  the  early  days,  the  farmers  and  travelers  through  this  section 
using  a  convenient  crossing  known  as  Grater's  Ford,  near  the 
present  Iron  Bridge  at  the  low^er  end  of  Schwenkville.  Here 
high  on  the  side  of  the  hill,  overlooking  the  beautiful  Perkiomen 
Valley,  stands  the  old  homestead,  until  recently  owned  and  occupied 
by  the  late  Enos  S.  Schwenck,  the  family  historian,  son  of  Samuel 
and  grandson  of  Abraham. 

Mr,  Schwenck  purchased  from  his  son  Abraham  Schwenck,  a 
plantation  and  house  in  Upper  Providence  Township  January  6, 
1826,  but  three  years  later  he  sold  this  to  John  Crater. 

Abraham  Schw^enck  served  in  the  Revolutionary  War  as  Ser- 
geant of  the  Seventh  Class,  in  the  company  commanded  by  Captain 
James  Haslett,  Second  Battalion,  Philadelphia  County  Militia, 
November  20,  1778."  We  also  find  his  name  on  the  class  roll  of 
Captain  Michael  Gangler's  Company  of  the  Fourth  Battalion 
Montgomery  County  Militia,  commanded  by  Lieutenant  Colonel 
Peter  Richards  for  the  year  1786.^     On  the  same  roll  appear  the 


1  Deed  Book  No.  51,  p.  195.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Sixth  Series,  Volume  I,  p.  669. 

3  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Sixth  Series,  Volume   III,  p.  670. 


5 


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D\>-iEf     SCHW  !i;>.CK 


Cm  .■\u>n.iSf  6j  180V,  Abraliam  Scbwcnck  purc^iased  a  larin 
o.f  vice  au£)-:h'c-1  and  fori)'  tj.cre*^  in.  Skjppack  Tovvii^hip  of  John 
Debavrn  ;a:  -iff  ;-.u,m  of  S5i33..3J  1 -JSdv:  l)ei.ni>  the  oki  honi^^-^.tead 

-;-.<  :=•  rvs  oi  'il-niv'  Keel  's  ^»iA  iKijoiiissg.     I'e^-e  he  reside.!  imiil 

'    .'.... r- '■■;:y;;,;:*v,.^  - •  ■.. ij ? ,. ' .     lhv:re  vrasi.n^'  bruU^e  .-.vT'^-s  ibv  .reck 
'  ■     % 

:-^  ;;-.v-    -;•-  :,._^,  ,?;.^^ 

.  '.::    ■.    ...  .  ;  .■■:•:  ^a.  '^!.::>>e^    f -Tc  V  .i^Piue  'Town.-hip  j-inuary  u, 
:  3      '.  ;■  ";.'■■'    ^var.-  later  j.:e  soid  '■his  to  Tonii  Crale.r. 

..■I/;-:  ',.:■;•'  ■.  ^\V';-T:i.rl,  j:erved  .in  tbe  Kc-voiutionary  War  ^s  Ser- 
C;r-:,i  ./f  ;  ;v  ^ '•'  '.nU  C'la:v>.  in  tbe  compaxiy  comn^anded  by  Captain 
].^;-nC'.  lia  u'-  -W'Cond  Battol^o:^,  Pb'l;j.de]p.hi;>.  (x;unty  i^Tidtia, 
''Nt:V'-rid;.v-:  ■:;•,  .'■'-■■>/'  We  ai-o  nnd  his  rionie  on  die  da?s  roll  o.C 
Capcdfi  M!d::;v'';  '.  ia^gier'.-;  Co^npairy  nl  the  V  .vjifji  Brdtalion 
Moiiigomtr;'  Co^xrv.}  ^Id't.ra,  conioianded  by  Lteuienaist  Colonel 
T  v?er  RicbrirJv  iCr  vh(;  v:''.r  1786/^     On  tbe  same  roll  aijpear  the 


■:i--:,:    A;\-;i-c^.  S;.h.4.  ;.:c;ies.  Vvk'sV.?     '.]' 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  299 

names  of  Daniel  Swenck,  John  Dehaven,  Jacob  Panebacker,  Philip 
Dotterer,  etc. 

Abraham  Schwenck  and  his  family  were  members  of  the  old 
Keeley's  Lutheran  Church,  situated  about  a  mile  from  the  village, 
the  same  building  being  used  by  the  Reformed  Congregation.  This 
church  was  organized  about  1756,  but  as  the  village  grew,  it  was 
found  that  the  location  was  too  far  away  and  inconvenient  to  reach 
in  bad  weather,  so  steps  were  taken  to  build  suitable  churches  in 
Schwenkville  and  Abraham  Schwenck  gave  the  ground  upon  which 
the  Lutheran  Church  was  eventually  erected;  later,  his  grand- 
daughter, Mrs.  Mary  Geiger,  gave  the  parsonage  as  a  memorial  to 
her  father,  Jacob  Schwenck.  The  Reformed  Congregation  also 
moved  into  Schwenkville,  the  ground  for  this  edifice  being  donated 
by  Elizabeth  Schwenk  Strassburger.  After  the  death  of  her  hus- 
band, Reuben  Y.  Strassburger,  in  1873,  she  placed  in  the  church  a 
beautiful  stained  glass  window  in  his  memory. 

Abraham  Schwenck  died  August  6,  1843.  He  made  a  will 
dated  July  11,  1842,  which  was  admitted  for  probate  a  month 
after  his  death.  His  wife,  Fronica,  having  died  September  13, 
1840,  he  divided  his  entire  estate  among  his  nine  children,  or  their 
heirs,  equally,  and  named  his  sons,  George,  Jacob  and  Samuel, 
and  his  son-in-law,  George  Reiff,  executors.  At  the  time  of  the 
making  of  his  will,  he  and  his  son,  Samuel,  were  occupying  the 
old  homestead,  and  to  this  son  he  bequeathed  the  homestead  farm. 

Will  of  Abraham  Schwenck,  1843 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen, — I  Abraham  Schwenck  of  the  Township 
of  Skippack  &  Perkiomin  in  the  County  of  Montgomery  and  State  of 
Pennsylvania,  being  sensible  of  the  uncertain  duration  of  this  Life,  and 
being  desirous  while  I  am  yet  of  sound  mind,  memory  and  understanding 
to  make  such  disposition  of  my  worldly  affairs,  that  after  my  Decease  my 
Children  and  their  Issue,  may  each  have  the  benefit  of  an  Equal  share  of 
my  whole  Estate:  Do  therefore  make,  ordain  &  publish  this  as  my  last 
Will  and  Testament  in  manner  &  form  following,  to  Wit : — First,  I  give 
and  bequeath  unto  my  son  Samuel  and  to  his  heirs  &  assigns,  the  Messuage 
and  Plantation  whereon  I  and  the  said  Samuel  now  reside,  Containing 
about  one  hundred  &  seventy  seven  acres,  more  or  less,  with  the  appur- 
tenances. Together,  with  a  lot  of  about  eight  acres  of  Wood  land  in  Fred- 
erick Township  adjoining  Webers  &  Steiners  land.  He  paying  the  Con- 


300  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

sideration  or  price  of  eight  thousand  Dollars  for  the  same. — The  whole 
of  the  said  consideration  is  to  be  paid  on  the  first  day  of  April  next 
ensuing  the  first  of  April  after  my  decease  without  Interest,  the  whole  to 
remain  a  lien  upon  said  messuage  &  Plantation  until  paid  The  said  Samuel 
to  have  full  possession  of  said  premises  on  the  first  of  April  next  ensuing 
my  Decease,  and  account  to  the  Estate  for  what  ever  Rent  may  be  then 
due  me ;  or  for  what  ever  Interest  I  may  then  have  in  the  Crops  in  the 
Ground. — Secondly,  It  is  my  Will  and  Devise,  that  my  hereinafter  named 
Executors  shall  as  soon  as  convenient  after  my  decease,  sell  and  dispose 
of  all  the  rest  &  residue  of  my  Estate  both  Real  and  personal  not  other- 
wise devised,  either  at  Public  or  private  Sale,  and  on  such  terms  as  they 
may  think  most  to  the  advantage  of  the  Estate,  and  that  they  shall  also 
collect  my  outstanding  debts  and  convert  the  same  into  ready  funds,  out  of 
the  proceeds  of  which  they  shall  in  the  first  place  pay  all  my  just  debts 
and  funeral  expence. —  And  to  the  residue  shall  be  added  the  valuation 
of  the  real  Estate  Devised  to  Samuel ;  And  to  which  shall  also  be  added 
the  following  sums  owing  to  me  or  given  by  me  to  my  Children,  to  wit : — 
"Elizabeth  Walt  the  sum  of  $2481.24  "George  Schwenck  the  sum  of 
$3842.35.     "Jacob  Schwenk  the  sum  of  $2987.87.     "Samuel  Schwenck 
the  sum  of  $3301.68.     "Catherine  Croll,  the  sum  of  $2136.45.     "Maria, 
now  the  wife  of  George  Reiff,  the  sum  of  $2431.31>^     "The  heirs  of  John 
Schwenk— the   sum   of    $5157.92.     "The    heirs   of    Abraham    Schwenk, 
(including  the  dower  fund  of   1000  Dollars,  secured  in  the  plantation 
charged  to  the  said  Abraham  in  my  Family  Book,  of  which  the  widow  of 
the  said  Abraham  is  to  receive  the  Interest  at  5  per  cent  during  her 
natural  life  time,  &  on  the  first  day  of  April,  after  her  decease  the  said 
Dower,  or  1000  Dollars  shall  be  paid  to  the  said  Heirs)  the  sum  of — 
$4678.31.     The  aggregate  product  of  the  whole  after  payment  of  all  legal 
charges  and  expences  shall  be  divided  into  eight  equal  parts  or  shares, 
which  I  dispose  of  as  follows,  to  wit:  One  share,  I  give  to  my  Daughter 
Elizabeth,  and  to  her  heirs,  one  other  share,  I  give  to  my  Son  George,  and  to 
his  heirs. —  one  other  share,  I  give  to  my  Son  Jacob,  and  to  his  heirs. 
one  other  share,  I  give  to  my  son  Samuel,  and  to  his  heirs. —  one  other 
share,  I  give  to  my  Daughter  Maria,  the  wife  of  George  Reiff,  and  to  her 
heirs. —  one  other  share  I  give  to  my  Daughter  Catherine,  and  to  her 
heirs. —  one  other  share,  I  give  to  the  heirs  of  my  Son  John. —  one  other 
share,  I  give  to  the  heirs  of  my  Son  Abraham,  as  aforesaid. —  PRO- 
VIDED NEVERTHELESS,  that  in  this  distribution  of  my  Estate,  the 
sums  of  money,  before  mentioned  as  given  by  me  or  owing  to  me  by  my 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  301 

said  Children  respectively,  shall  in  the  first  place  be  deducted  out  of  such 
Childs  share;  any  money  that  I  may  hereafter  advance  to  any  of  my 
Children,  and  Charge  same  in  my  family  Book,  shall  in  the  first  place  be 
deducted  of,  out  of  such  Childs  share  and  only  the  balance  or  residue  shall 
be  given  or  settled  as  aforesaid. —  ITEM,  It  is  my  Will  that  none  of  my 
Children  shall  bring  claim  against  my  Estate  for  work  or  service ;  and  if 
any  Child  shall  bring  such  claim  and  recover,  I  direct  that  the  amount  of 
such  claim  shall  be  deducted  out  of  such  Childs  share. —  (my  express 
Will  and  desire  is,  that  if  any  difference  or  disputed  question  or  contro- 
versy, shall  arise  or  happen  concerning  any  gift,  bequest  or  other  matter  or 
things  in  this  my  will,  the  same  shall  be  referred  wholly  to  the  award, 
order  and  determination  of  my  esteemed  friends  and  neighbors,  John 
Hunsicker  &  John  Landes — with  power  for  them  to  choose  an  umpire ; 
but  if  they  or  either  of  them  should  not  be  able  or  willing  to  act  in  the 
preinises,  then  I  do  direct  that  my  eldest  son  and  Eldest  Daughter  shall 
each  appoint  an  arbitrator  or  arbitrators,  with  the  same  power  of  choos- 
ing an  umpire,  and  what  they  or  a  majority  of  them  shall  order,  direct 
or  determine  therein,  shall  be  binding  and  conclusive,  to  and  on  all  and 
every  person  and  persons  therein  Concerned.)  My  further  Will  is,  and 
I  do  hereby  order,  appoint  and  empower  my  said  Son-in-law  George  Reiff, 
to  be  Gaurdian  of  the  persons  and  Estates  of  the  minor  Children  of  my 
late  Deceased  Son  Abraham  named  as  follows,  to  wit,  Isaac,  Abraham, 
David,  Wihiam,  Margaret  &  Sarah — from  the  first  Day  of  April  last  past, 
untill  each  of  the  said  minor  Children  shall  attain  the  age  of  21  years. — 
The  sum  of  $500  being  due  to  each  of  them  on  the  said  first  day  of  April, 
and  in  the  hands  of  the  said  George  Reiff;  and  of  the  further  sum  or 
sums  that  will  be  due  to  them  immediately  after  my  decease ;  And  also, 
of  so  much  of  the  above  said  Dower  as  will  come  to  the  hands  of  said 
Reiff,  If  any  The  said  Guardian  to  be  charged  with  5  per  cent  Interest 
per  annum  untill  each  shall  come  to  the  proper  age  of  21. —  Lastly,  I  do 
nominate,  constitute  and  appoint  my  said  son,  George  Schwenk,  Jacob 
Schwenk,  Samuel  Schwenk  and  Son-in-law  George  Reiff,  to  be  the  Execu- 
tors of  this  my  last  Will  and  testament,  hereby  empowering  them  or  the 
survivors  or  survivor  of  them,  to  make  Deeds  for  the  Coveyance  of  all 
or  any  part  of  my  real  Estate,  and  to  do  all  such  other  matters  and  things 
as  may  be  necessary  for  carrying  this  my  last  Will  and  Testament  in  to 
full  and  complete  effect,  according  to  the  intend  and  meaning  thereof — 
Hereby  revoking  any  former  Will  by  me  made,  and  Declaring  this  alone 
to  be  my  last  Will  and  Testament. — In  Testimony  whereof,  I  have  here- 


302  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

unto  set  my  hand  and  seal,  this  eleventh  day  of  July  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  Forty  two.^ 

Signed,  Sealed,  published  &  De-  yy     ^  >o^ 

Glared  by  the  aforenamed  Abra-  (Z^tc^ c'i/v*:Zo^t^<u 
ham  Schwenk,  as  and  for  his  last 
Will  and  Testament,  in  the  pres- 
ence of  us,  who,  at  his  request, 
have  signed  as  witneses,  to  the 
same, 

Henry  Kolb, 

John  Landes. 

In  1846  a  number  of  the  heirs  signed  a  release  to  Jacob 
Schwenck,  one  of  the  executors  of  the  will,  acknowledging  that 
they  had  each  received  their  share  of  their  father's  and  grand- 
father's estate. 

Release  of  Heirs  of  Abraham  Schwenck  to  Jacob  Schwenck,  1846 

KNOW  ALL  MEN  by  these  presents  that  we  Elizabeth  Wald  late 
Elizabeth  Schwenck,  Abraham  Schwenck  and  Jacob  Saylor,  administrators 
of  George  Schwenck,  deceased,  Samuel  Schwenck,  George  Reiff  and 
Mary  his  wife,  late  Mary  Schwenck,  Catharine  Croll,  late  Catherine 
Schwenck,  and  the  legal  heirs  of  Abraham  Schwenck  the  younger, 
deceased,  Isaac  Schwenck,  Susannah  Keyser,  late  Susannah  Schwenck, 
Harriet  Schwenck  intermarried  with  Jesse  Bean,  George  Reiff,  Testa- 
mentary Guardian,  Abraham  Schwenck,  David  Schwenck,  Margaret 
Schwenck  and  Sarah  Schwenck,  heirs  and  legatees  named  in  the  last  Will 
and  Testament  of  Abraham  Schwenck,  late  of  Skippack  Township,  Mont- 
gomery County,  deceased,  do  hereby  acknowledge  that  we  and  each  of 
us  this  day  had  of  and  from  Jacob  Schwenck,  one  of  the  Executors  of  the 
last  Will  and  Testament  of  said  Abraham  Schwenck  the  elder,  deceased, 
by  Elizabeth  Wald  $5709.87,  George  Schwenck,  administrator  the  bal- 
ance $1472.52  with  the  sum  of  the  said  George  Schwenck  Received  in  his 
lifetime  makes  $5709.87 ;  Samuel  Schwenck  $5709.87 ;  George  Reiff  and 
Alary  his  wife  $5709.87 ;  Catherine  Croll  $5709.87.  The  heirs  of  Abra- 
ham Schwenck  the  younger,  deceased,  by  Isaac  Schwenck  the  sum  of 
$136.90,  by  Susannah  Keyser  and  her  husband  $136.90,  by  Harriet 
Schwenck  intermarried  with  Jesse  Bean  $136.90,  by  George  Reiff  guardian 


1  Will  Book  No.  8,  p.  287.     Register  of  Wills.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


Reverse   side  of  tombstone  of 

Abraham    Schwenk. 

D.    A.    R.    Marker    placed    on 

srave   of   revolution   Patriot. 


Fkonica  Bauer  Schwenk, 
Born  Apr.  10,  1756. 
Died    Sept.    13,    ISIO. 


Abraham  Schwenk, 
Born  May  24,  1759. 
Died  Aug.  6,  1843. 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  303 

of  Abraham  David,  Margaret  and  Sarah  Schwenck  the  sum  of  $547.60 
for  his  wards  with  the  sum  that  Abraham  Schwenck  received  in  his  Hfe- 
time  will  make  the  sum  of  $5709.87,  being  the  full  satisfaction  and  pay- 
ment of  all  such  sums  of  money,  legacies  or  bequests  as  are  given  and 
bequeathed  to  us  the  above  named  children  and  grand  children  by  last 
Will  and  Testament  of  the  said  Abraham  Schwenck,  deceased,  the  twen- 
tieth day  of  January  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred 
and  forty-six.^ 

George  Reiff  Elizabeth  Wald 

Mary  Reiff  Abraham   M.   Schwenck 

Isaac  Schwenck  Jacob  Saylor 

George  Reiff  Samuel  Schwenck 

Catherine  Croll. 

As  late  as  1854  others  of  the  heirs  acknowledged  the  receipt 
of  their  full  inheritance  from  George  Reiff  and  Samuel  Schwenck, 
two  of  the  executors. 

Release,  Heirs  of  John  Schwenck  to  Jacob  Schwenck,  1854 

KNOW  ALL  MEN  by  these  presents  that  we  legal  heirs  of  John 
Schwenck,  deceased,  Abraham  Schwenck,  Susannah  Schwenck  inter- 
married with  Samuel  Weber,  Catherine  Schwenck  intermarried  with 
Aaron  Mattis,  heirs  and  legatees  named  in  the  last  Will  and  Testament 
of  Abraham  Schwenck,  late  of  Skippack  Township,  County  of  Mont- 
gomery, do  hereby  acknowledge  that  we  each  of  us  have  this  day  had 
and  received  of  and  from  Jacob  Schwenck  one  of  the  executors  of  the 
Last  Will  and  Testament  of  the  said  Abraham  Schwenck,  deceased,  by 
Abraham  Schwenck  the  sum  of  $92.01,  by  Susannah  Schwenck  inter- 
married with  Samuel  Weaver  the  sum  of  $92.01,  by  Catherine  Schwenck 
intermarried  with  Aaron  Mattis  the  sum  of  $92.01.  To  each  of  them  he 
advanced  in  his  lifetime  the  sum  of  $859.65,  will  make  our  portion  of  the 
real  and  personal  estate  of  Abraham  Schwenck,  deceased,  in  full  satis- 
faction and  payment  of  all  such  sums  or  legacies  as  are  given  and 
bequeathed  to  us  the  said  above  named  children  and  grandchildren  by 


1  Miscellaneous  Book  No.  6,  p.  466.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


304  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

the  last  Will  and  Testament  of  the  said  Abraham  Schwenck,  deceased. 
April  1852.1 

Abraham  Schwenck 
her 

Susanna    X    Weber 

mark 
Samuel  Weber. 
Catherine  Mattis 
Aaron  Mattis 

Jacob,  the  son  and  one  of  the  executors  of  Abraham,  Sr., 
died  August  19,  1852,  and  his  executors,  his  son,  Abraham  G. 
Schwenck,  and  Jacob  G.  Schwenck,  and  son-in-law,  Reuben  Y. 
Strassburger,  signed,  with  others  of  the  grandchildren,  a  deed  of 
release  and  full  satisfaction  to  Samuel  Schwenck  and  George  Reiff, 
the  surviving  executors  of  Abraham  Schwenck,  Sr.' 

Both  Abraham  Schwenck  and  his  wife,  Fronica  Bauer,  are 
buried  in  the  Keeley  Reformed  Churchyard,  now  the  Schwenk- 
ville  Graveyard,  about  a  half  mile  from  that  village. 

Children  of  Abraham  Schzvcnck  and  Fronica  Bauer: 

1.  Elizabeth  Schwenck,  born  June    19,   1780;   died   November  27, 

1858 ;  married  Andrew  Walt ;  resided  near  Pottstown,  Penn- 
sylvania. 

2.  George  Schwenck,  born  December  7,  1783;  died  July  6,  1845; 

married  Catherine  Moyer ;  he  was  a  Captain  Second  Regi- 
ment Volunteer  Light  Infantry,  1812-1814;^  Resided  in 
Limerick  Township,  Montgomery  County,  Pa. 

3.  John  Schwenck,  born  May  3,  1785,  at  Delphi,  Frederick  Town- 

ship, Montgomery  County,  Pennsylvania;  died  April  30, 
1830;  married  Catherine  Snyder. 

4.  Anna  Schwenck,  born  September  5,  1786;  died  March  29,  1803, 

unmarried;  buried  in  Schwenck's  private  burial  ground. 

5.  JACOB  SCHWENCK,  born  September  14,  1789;  died  August 

19,  1852;  married  (1)  MAGDALENA  ZIEGLER;  (2) 
Mary  Gehman, 


1  Miscellaneous  Book  No.  6,  p.  376.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Miscellaneous  Book  No.  7,  p.  627.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 

3  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Sixth  Series,  Volume  VIII,  p.  709. 


305 

>1  Delphi ;  died  April 

inherited  the  home- 

>    sdu    Enos    S. 

'.:  ■-'•nt;    Enos 

;/  Asso- 

•    in, 4  !nte)■e^t 

■      •■■    i>iuch 

iii- 


on  lirif. 


k   and 

.  -t  19,  1852. 

iier  s  tajmery  and  farn^ 

:.  !•.;  ^^tialenaZiegler,  daughter 

_.._...  ^"'?'.4^?^of  P'rederickTowDship, 

'er  4,  1795, 

•n  1816,  a  farm  oi  eighty-nine  acres  lying  in 

:iip,  to     '     ■    ^     ' "ht  his  young  bride.    This 

■ss  tht  ■  ■  '■-  ~'"OT^n  thnt  of  his  father, 

ed  a  la.  '•  in  part  of 

and,  ov,  it>,  ijc ;.  ao:om- 

^  ■■--,■  ':  ■  •  -  obht^v.;  V,.  •  -Op  over 

.bout  1845  he  by  ill 
lis  hous-.  then  known  as  the 

.auo\>m£'  VQBT  he  ;= - 


iOUiv.   its 

Perkiomen  and 

time  whig;   in 

us  largely  through 


Jacob  Schwenk. 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  305 

6.  Samuel  B.  Schwenck,  born  April  13,  1791,  at  Delphi;  died  April 

23,  1864;  married  Rachel  Smoyer;  he  inherited  the  home- 
stead farm,  which  he  bequeathed  to  his  son  Enos  S. 
Schwenck,  who  owns  and  occupies  it  at  present;  Enos 
Schwenck  was  the  founder  of  the  Schwenck  Family  Asso- 
ciation and  the  family  historian.  It  is  owing  to  his  interest 
in  collecting  data  for  the  family  history  that  so  much 
genealogical  value  has  been  preserved  and  much  of  the  in- 
formation on  the  later  generations  has  been  taken  from  his 
record. 

7.  Abraham  Schwenck. 

8.  Mary  Schwenck,  married  George  Reiff. 

9.  Catherine  Schwenck,  married Croll. 

JACOB  SCHWENCK,  son  of  Abraham  Schwenck  and 
Fronica  Bauer,  was  born  in  Frederick  Township,  Montgomery 
County,  Pennsylvania,  September  14,  1789;  died  August  19,  1852. 
His  early  life  was  spent  in  and  about  his  father's  tannery  and  farm 
near  Delphi.  About  1817  he  married  Magdalena  Ziegler,  daughter 
of  Andrew  Ziegler  and  Catherine  Lederach,  of  Frederick  Township, 
born  September  4,  1795. 

He  purchased,  in  1816,  a  farm  of  eighty-nine  acres  lying  in 
Skippack  Township,  to  which  he  brought  his  young  bride.  This 
property  lay  across  the  Perkiomen  Creek  from  that  of  his  father. 
In  1816  he  opened  a  large  store  of  general  merchandise  in  part  of 
his  dwelling  and,  owing  to  freshets  and  floods,  he  also  gave  accom- 
modations to  travelers,  as  they  were  sometimes  obliged  to  stop  over 
a  day  or  two  until  they  could  ford  the  creek.  About  1845  he  built 
an  addition  to  his  house  and  started  what  was  then  known  as  the 
Farmers  and  Mechanics'  Hotel.  The  following  year  he  erected  a 
large  and  commodious  dwelling,  with  a  large  storeroom,  on  the 
opposite  side  of  the  street.  He  thus  became  the  founder  of  the 
thriving  borough  of  Schwenkville.  It  was  about  this  time  that  the 
family  began  to  drop  the  final  "c"  in  their  name  and  it  took  its 
present  form  of  Schwenk. 

He  took  an  active  part  in  the  building  of  the  Perkiomen  and 
Sumneytown  Turnpike;  in  politics,  was  an  old-time  whig;  in 
religion,  a  member  of  the  Lutheran  Church.  It  was  largely  through 
the  efforts  of  Mr.  Schwenk,  who  aided  with  money,  teams  and  lead- 


306  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

ership,  that  the  present  two-story  stone  building,  with  an  interior 
gallery  on  three  sides,  was  erected  and  consecrated  about  1830- 
1834,  This  church  was  built  within  the  present  bounds  of  Schwenk- 
ville,  while  the  graveyard  attached  to  the  old  Keely  Church  has 
been  enlarged  and  is  now  known  as  Schwenkville  Cemetery. 

Jacob  Schwenk,  with  his  brothers,  Daniel  and  Samuel,  were 
the  executors  of  the  will  of  their  father,  Abraham,  but  before  the 
estate,  which  was  quite  large,  was  entirely  settled,  Jacob  died,  leav- 
ing a  will  in  which  he  disposed  of  a  large  amount  of  property.  This 
will  is  on  file  at  Norristown. 

Will  of  Jacob  Schwenck,  1852 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen  I  Jacob  Schwenck  of  the  Township  of 
Skippack  &  Perkioming-  in  the  County  of  Montgomery  and  State  of  Penn- 
sylvania being  sensible  of  the  uncertain  duration  of  this  life  and  being 
desirous  while  I  am  yet  of  sound  mind  memory  and  understanding  to 
make  such  disposition  of  my  worldly  affairs  that  after  my  decease  my 
Children  and  their  Issue  may  each  have  the  benefit  of  an  equal  share 
of  my  worldly  estate.  Do  therefore  make  ordain  and  Publish  this  as 
my  last  Will  and  Testament  in  manner  and  form  following  to  wit  First 
I  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  beloved  wife  Mary  two  Bedsteads  with 
bedding  Stove  and  Pipe,  Clock  &  Case,  and  one  Cow.  I  also  give  her 
one  hundred  dollars  in  Cash  of  the  first  money  my  hereinafter  named 
Executor  shall  get  in  hand.  I  further  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  said 
Wife  during  life  the  Interest  of  Three  Thousand  two  Hundred  and  fifty 
Dollars  at  five  per  cent  per  annum  to  be  paid  to  her  annually.  Three 
Thousand  Dollars  of  the  aforesaid  sum  is  to  be  secured  in  and  remain 
a  lien  upon  the  Messuage  Plantation  and  Tavern  stand  whereon  I  now 
live  or  reside.  And  two  hundred  and  fifty  dollars  being  the  remainder 
of  the  three  thousand  two  hundred  and  Fifty  dollars,  is  to  be  secured  in 
and  remain  a  lien  upon  the  Lot  and  store  house.  Secondly  I  give  & 
bequeath  unto  my  son  Jacob  a  lot  on  which  is  erected  a  Brick  house 
occupied  as  a  store,  on  the  East  side  of  the  Turnpike  as  follows.  Begin- 
ning in  a  line  of  John  Webers  Estate  in  the  Middle  of  the  Turnpike  on 
Mine  Run  Bridge  thence  down  said  pike  to  a  Iron  stake  in  Middle  of  the 
said  Turnpike  thence  a  right  angle  to  pass  on  the  North  side  of  the 
sheds  to  the  East  side  of  the  Perkioming  Creek  in  a  line  of  Peter  Sny- 
ders  land  thence  along  said  line  up  Perkioming  Creek  to  a  line  of  the 
Estate  of  John  Weber  Deceased  thence  along  said  line  to  the  place  of 
Beginning  with  the  appurtenances  thereunto  belonging  to  his  heirs  and 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  307 

assigns  for  ever  subject  to  the  services  and  privileges  aforesaid  together 
with  a  lot  of  about  two  acres  and  one  hundred  and  Nineteen  perches  of 
Woodland  in  Frederick  Township  adjoining  lands  of  William  Gotshalk, 
Samuel  Pool,  Lewis  Miller  and  others  he  paying  the  Consideration  or 
price  of  two  Thousand  Dollars  for  the  same  in  the  following  Manner  to 
wit,  the  sum  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  Dollars  of  said  Consideration 
Money  is  to  remain  in  said  premises  the  Interest  whereof  to  be  paid  to  my 
dear  wife  annually  at  the  rate  of  Five  per  cent  annum  the  principal  to  be 
paid  together  with  the  Interest  which  may  be  upon  it  on  the  first  day 
of  April  next  ensuing  her  decease,  the  whole  to  remain  a  lien  on  the 
premises  till  paid  Thirdly  I  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  son  Abraham  and 
to  his  heirs  and  Assigns  for  ever  The  Messuage  Plantation  and  Tavern 
whereon  I  now  reside  Containing  about  seventy  six  acres  more  or  less 
with  the  appurtenances  (subject  to  the  services  and  privileges  aforesaid, 
together  with  a  lot  or  Messuage  and  tenant  house  containing  about  sixteen 
Acres  More  or  less  with  the  appurtenances  thereunto  belonging,  situate 
in  Frederick  Township  Montgomery  County  adjoining  lands  of  Conrad 
Keeler  Jacob  Snyder  also  a  lot  of  Woodland  in  aforesaid  Frederick  Town- 
ship Containing  about  ten  acres  be  it  the  same  more  or  less  adjoining  the 
aforesaid  tenant  house  lot  and  lands  of  Conrad  Keeler  Noah  Umstead  and 
others,  also  a  lot  of  Woodland  in  aforesaid  Frederick  Township  Con- 
taining about  seven  acres  be  it  the  same  more  or  less  adjoining  lands  of 
George  Keeler,  Henry  Ziegler,  Samuel  Pannebecker,  and  others  Also  a 
lot  of  Woodland  in  aforesaid  Frederick  Township  Containing  about  six 
acres  and  thirty  seven  perches  be  it  the  same  more  or  less  adjoining  lands 
of  Lewis  Miller  Frederick  Yerger  and  others  he  paying  the  considera- 
tion or  price  of  six  thousand  Dollars  for  the  same  in  the  following  man- 
ner to  wit  Three  Thousand  Dollars  of  said  Consideration  money  is  to 
remain  in  the  premises  the  Interest  whereof  to  be  paid  to  my  dear  wife 
annually  at  the  rate  of  Five  per  cent  per  annum,  The  principal  to  be  paid 
together  with  the  Interest  which  may  be  upon  it  on  the  first  day  of  April 
next  ensuing  her  decease  The  whole  to  remain  a  lien  on  the  aforesaid 
Messuage  and  premises  till  paid  FOURTHLY  It  is  my  will  and  devise 
that  my  herein  after  named  Executors  shall  as  soon  as  convenient  after 
my  decease,  sell  and  dispose  of  all  the  rest  and  residue  of  my  Estate  both 
real  and  personal  not  otherwise  devised  either  at  public  or  private  sale, 
and  on  such  terms  as  they  may  think  most  to  the  advantage  of  the  estate 
and  that  they  shall  also  collect  my  outstanding  Debts  and  convert  the 
same  into  ready  funds  out  of  the  proceeds  of  which  they  shall  in  the  first 
place  pay  all  my  Just  debts  and  funeral  Expenses,  And  to  the  residue  shall 
be  added  the  valuations  of  the  real  Estate  devised  to  my  sons  Jacob  and 


308  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Abraham  as  aforesaid  and  to  which  shall  also  be  added  the  following 
sums  owing  to  me  or  given  by  me  to  my  Children  to  wit,  Catharine  Inter- 
married to  Abraham  Steiner  the  sum  of  $2452.36  Mary  Intermarried  to 
Doctor  Henry  Geiger  the  sum  of  $1399.78  Elizabeth  Intermarried  to 
Reuben  Strassburger  the  sum  of  $1646.72  Jacob  G.  Schwenk  the  sum  of 
$2532.00.  The  aggregate  product  of  the  whole  after  payment  of  all  legal 
Charges  and  expences  shall  be  divided  into  Eight  equal  parts  or  shares 
which  I  dispose  of  as  follows  to  wit.  one  Share  I  give  to  my  daughter 
Elizabeth  the  wife  of  Reuben  Strassburger  and  to  her  heirs,  one  other 
share  I  give  to  my  Daughter  j\Iary  the  wife  of  Doctor  Henry  Geiger  and  to 
her  heirs.  One  other  share  I  give  to  my  son  Jacob  and  to  his  heirs,  one 
other  share  I  give  to  my  son  Abraham  and  to  his  heirs,  one  other  share  I 
give  to  my  son  Samuel  and  to  his  heirs  or  to  his  Guardian  if  he  should 
be  under  21  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  my  Decease.  One  other  share  I 
give  to  my  son  John  and  to  his  heirs  or  to  his  Guardian  if  he  should  be 
under  21  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  my  decease.  One  other  share  I  give 
to  my  son  Henry  and  to  his  heirs  or  to  his  Guardian  if  he  should  be  under 
21  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  my  decease.  One  other  share  I  give  to  my 
Daughter  Catharine  the  wife  of  Abraham  Steiner  in  the  following  man- 
ner to  wit.  After  the  charges  in  my  Family  Book  of  $2452.36  and  such 
other  Moneys  or  things  advanced  to  her  by  me  and  charged  in  my  Family 
Book  against  her  be  deducted  from  her  share  then  the  Balance  or  residue 
I  direct  my  herein  after  named  Executors  to  put  out  upon  Mortgage  for 
the  best  Interest  that  can  be  obtained.  The  Interest  thereof  to  be  paid 
to  my  Daughter  Catharine  annually  during  her  natural  life  time  and  after 
her  decease  the  principal  together  with  the  Interest  which  may  be  upon  it 
to  her  heirs  in  equal  shares.  Provided  nevertheless  that  in  this  distribu- 
tion of  my  Estate  the  sums  of  money  before  mentioned  as  given  by  me  or 
owing  to  me  by  my  Children  respectively  shall  in  the  first  place  be  de- 
ducted out  of  such  childs  share  and  all  charges  in  my  Family  Book  charged 
hereafter  against  any  of  my  children  shall  in  the  first  place  be  deducted 
out  of  such  childs  share  and  only  the  balance  or  residue  shall  be  given  or 
settled  as  aforesaid.  ITEM  It  is  my  will  that  none  of  my  Children  shall 
bring  claim  against  my  Estate  for  work  or  services,  and  if  any  Child  shall 
bring  such  claim  and  recover  I  direct  that  the  amount  of  such  Claim  shall 
be  deducted  out  of  such  childs  share,  and  further  I  do  order  and  direct 
that  if  any  of  my  Children  should  die  before  they  arrive  at  the  age  of 
twenty  one  years  without  leaving  Issue  then  in  that  case  the  share  coming 
to   such   child   shall  be   equally  divided   amongst   the   remainder   of   my 

Children  or  their  heirs LASTLY  I  do  nominate  constitute  and 

appoint  my  son  Jacob  G.  Schwenk  and  my  son  Abraham  G.  Schwenk  and 
my  son  in  law  Ruben  Strassburger  to  be  the  Executors  of  this  my  last 


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THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  309. 

will  and  Testament  And  also  to  be  the  Trustee  for  the  Trust  therein  men- 
tioned hereby  empowering  them  or  the  survivors  or  survivor  of  them  to 
make  Deeds  for  the  Conveyance  of  all  or  any  part  of  my  real  Estate  and 
to  do  all  such  other  Matters  and  things  as  may  be  necessary  for  carrying 
this  my  last  will  and  Testament  into  full  and  complete  effect  according 
to  the  intent  and  meaning  thereof  Hereby  revoking  any  former  will  and 
Testament  by  me  made  and  Declaring  this  alone  to  be  my  last  will  and 
Testament  IN  Testimony  whereof  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand  seal  this 
second  day  of  June  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  Eight  hundred 
and  forty  nine.^ 

Signed  Sealed  published  and  ^  x:>  ^  jO 

declared  by  the  Testator  as  his  /--^^^_>d<9  7v    (/^^'^-^-''^-'''''^-''V^ 

last  will  and  Testament  in  the 
presence  of  us 

John  Steiner 

Jacob  Johnson,    Miller 

Two  years  later,  April  10,  1854,  Aaron  and  Jacob,  two  grand- 
sons of  Abraham  Schwenck,  Sr.,  acknowledged  the  payment  of  all 
the  legacies  due  them  from  the  estate  of  their  grandfather.  This 
instrument  was  signed  by  the  surviving  executors  of  the  estate  of 
Abraham  Schwenck,  Sr.,  namely,  George  Reiff  and  Samuel 
Schwenk,  and  by  Jacob  G.  Schwenk,  Abraham  G.  Schwenk  and 
Reuben  Y.  Strassburger,  executors  of  the  estate  of  Jacob  Schwenk, 
deceased. 

Release  of  Legacy 

Aaron  and  Jacob  Schwenck  to  Surviving  Executors  of  Abraham 

Schwenck  and  of  Jacob  Schwenck,  1854 

KNOW  ALL  MEN  by  these  presents  that  we  Aaron  Schwenck,  and 
Jacob  Schwenck,  heirs  and  legatees  named  in  the  last  Will  and  Testament 
of  Abraham  Schwenck,  Senior,  deceased,  late  of  Skippack  Township,  in 
the  County  of  Montgomery,  do  hereby  acknowledge  that  we  each  of  us 
have  this  day  had  and  received  of  and  from  George  Reiff  and  Samuel 
Schwenck,  executors  of  said  Abraham  Schwenck,  Senior,  deceased,  and 
from  Jacob  G.  Schwenck,  Abraham  G.  Schwenck  and  Reuben  Y.  Strass- 
burger, Executors  of  Jacob  Schwenck,  Senior,  deceased,  the  sum  of  one 
hundred  and  thirty-two  dollars  and  eighty-four  cents,  being  principal  and 


iWill  Book,  No.  9,  pp.  355,  356,  357,  358.    Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


310  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

interest  our  portions  each  of  the  real  and  personal  estate  of  the  said 
Abraham  Schwenck,  Senior,  deceased,  in  full  satisfaction  and  payment  of 
all  such  sum  or  sums,  legacies,  and  bequest  as  are  given  and  bequeathed 
to  us  the  above  named  grandchildren  by  the  last  will  and  testament  of  the 
said  Abraham  Schwenck,  Senior,  deceased,  in  full  satisfaction  and  pay- 
ment out  of  the  real  and  personal  estate  of  the  said  Abraham  Schwenck, 
deceased,  and  all  the  interest  accrued  thereon  and  therefrom,  we  the  said 
Aaron  Schwenck  and  Jacob  Schwenck  do  by  these  presents  release  acquit 
and  forever  discharge  the  said  George  Reiff,  Samuel  Schwenck  and  John 
G.  Schwenck,  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger  and  Abraham  G.  Schwenck  execu- 
tors of  Jacob  Schwenck,  Sr.,  deceased,  of  and  from  the  said  legacy  or 
legacies.  In  witness  whereof  we  have  hereunto  set  our  hands  and  seals 
this  tenth  day  of  April  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  fifty-four.^ 

Aaron  Schwenck 
Jacob  Schwenck 

Ten  days  later,  April  20,  all  the  heirs  of  Jacob  Schwenk 
acknowledged  the  payment  of  all  legacies  due  them  from  their 
father's  estate. 

Release,  Heirs  of  Jacob  Schwenck  to  Jacob  G.  Schwenck  et  al,  1854 

KNOW  ALL  MEN  by  these  presents  that  we  Elizabeth  Strassburger, 
late  Elizabeth  Schwenck,  one  of  the  daughters  and  legatees  named  in  the 
last  Will  and  Testament  of  Jacob  Schwenck,  late  of  the  township  of 
Perkiomen  in  the  County  of  Montgomery  and  State  of  Pennsylvania, 
deceased,  Samuel  G.  Schwenck,  one  of  the  sons  and  legatees  named  in  the 
last  Will  and  Testament  of  the  said  Jacob  Schwenck,  deceased,  John  G. 
Schwenck,  also  one  of  the  sons  and  legatees  named  in  the  last  Will  and 
Testament  of  the  said  Jacob  Schwenck,  deceased,  Mary  Geiger  late  Mary 
Schwenck,  one  of  the  daughters  and  legatees  named  in  the  last  Will  and 
Testament  of  the  said  Jacob  Schwenck,  deceased,  Michael  Alderfer, 
guardian  of  Henry  G.  Schwenck,  also  one  of  the  sons  and  legatees  named 
in  the  last  Will  and  Testament  of  the  said  Jacob  Schwenck,  deceased,  do 
Hereby  acknowledge  that  we  the  said  Elizabeth  Strassburger  late  Eliza- 
beth Schwenck,  Samuel  G.  Schwenck,  John  G.  Schwenck,  Mary  Geiger 
late  Mary  Schwenck  and  Michael  Alderfer  guardian  of  Henry  G. 
Schwenck,  have  each  respectively  this  day  had  and  received  of  and  from 
Jacob  G.  Schwenck,  Abraham  G.  Schwenck  and  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger, 


1  Miscellaneous  Book  No.  7,  p.  627.     Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


Jacob  Schwenk, 
Born  Sept.  14,  17S9. 
Died  Aug.   19,   1852. 


Magdalen.-v  Ziegler  Schwenk, 
Born  Feb.  27,  1795. 
Died    Sept.    3,    1823. 

[Traiislafioii] 
Here 
lies  the  body  of 
Magdalcna  the  wife  of 
Jacob  Schwenk  and  daughter 
of   Andrew  Ziegler  born   the 
27th  Feb  1795  and  died  the 
3rd  Sept  1823  aged 
28   years   6   months   and   3    days. 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  311 

executors  of  the  last  Will  and  Testament  of  the  said  Jacob  Schwenck, 
deceased,  the  sum  of  $559.27  in  full  satisfaction  and  payment  of  all  such 
sum  or  sums,  legacies  or  bequests  as  are  given  and  bequeathed  to  us  the 
said  Elizabeth  Strassburger  late  Elizabeth  Schwenck,  Samuel  G. 
Schwenck,  John  G.  Schwenck,  Mary  Geiger  late  Mary  Schwenck,  and 
Michael  Alderfer  guardian  of  Henry  G.  Schwenck  by  the  last  will  and 
Testament  of  the  said  Jacob  Schwenck,  deceased.  *  *  *  In  testimony 
whereof  we  the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have  hereunto  interchange- 
ably set  our  hands  and  seals  this  twentieth  day  of  April  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  fifty  four.^ 

Elizabeth  Strassburger 
Sealed  and  delivered  in  S.  G.  Schwenck 

the  presence  of  us  John  G.  Schwenck 

T  1      TT    cx  •  Mary  Geiger 

John  H,  Sterner 

.,     ,        r^   -7-     1  Michael  Alderfer 

Abraham  O.  Ziegler 


Magdalena  Ziegler,  first  wife  of  Jacob  Schwenk,  died  Septem- 
ber 23,  1823,  in  her  twenty-ninth  year,  and  was  buried  in  the 
graveyard  of  Lower  Salford  Mennonite  Church,  of  which  her  father 
and  mother,  Andrew  Ziegler  and  Catherine  Lederach,  were  in- 
fluential members.  Her  grave  adjoins  that  of  her  parents,  who  died 
about  twenty  years  later. 

Jacob  Schwenk  married,  second,  Mary  Gehman,  daughter  of 

the  Rev.  Samuel  Gehman  and  widow  of Landis.  She  was  born 

July  15,  1800,  and  died  December  2,  1878,  surviving  by  more  than 
twenty-five  years  her  husband,  Jacob  Schwenk,  whose  death  oc- 
curred August  10, 1852.  Among  the  papers  found  with  the  original 
will  and  inventory  in  the  Register's  Office  at  Norristown  are  two  cer- 
tificates of  death,  made  out  by  the  attending  physician,  Henry 
Geiger,  M.D.,  his  son-in-law.  One  of  them  states  that  Jacob 
Schwenk  was  buried  at  Jerusalem  Church,  Skippack  Township, 
Montgomery  County,  Pennsylvania.  From  this  it  was  apparently 
the  first  intention  to  bury  him  in  the  graveyard  of  a  church  in 
Skippack  (Perkiomen  Township).  It  is  evident,  however,  that 
they  changed  their  minds,  for  he  was  laid  beside  his  father  and 
mother    in   the    graveyard    of    the    old    Keeley's    Church,    near 


1  Miscellaneous  Book  No.  7,  p.  624.     Norristown,   Pennsylvania. 


312  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Schwenkville,  with  which  congregation  he  had  long  been  identi- 
fied, a  large  marble  tombstone  marking  his  last  resting  place. 

Harleysville  August  Za'^^  1852 

I  do  hereby  certify  that  Jacob  Schwenk  Sen  died  at  his  residence 
in  Perkiomen  township  on  Thursday  morning  august  19"^  1852  of  valvu- 
lar disease  of  the  heart  at  the  age  of  62  years  11  months  and  5  days. 

Henry  Geiger,  M.D. 
Attending  Physician. 
To  John  M.  Jones,  Esq 

Register  of  Wills  &c  &c 

Physicians'  Record  of  Deaths 

Jacob  Schwenk  Sen,  white,  male,  62  years  11  months  &  5  days, 
father  Abraham  Schwenk,  mother  Fronica  Bowers  (later  Schwenk), 
Merchant  born  Frederick  Township,  Mont.  Co,  Pa.  Name  of  deceased 
wife  Mary  Gehman.  Born  Sept  14'^  A.D.  1789  died  August  19''^  A.D. 
1852  of  Organic  disease  of  Heart  died  in  Skippack  township  Montgomery 
Co.  Pa.  buried  Jerusalem  Church  burying  Ground  Skippack  township 
Mont  CO.  Pa. 

H.  Geiger    M.D. 
Harleysville 

August  26ti>  1852. 

Jacob  Schwenk  was  a  man  both  stern  and  amiable  and  a 
leader  in  his  community.  He  was  successful  in  business,  a  careful 
and  sound  counsellor  and  much  respected  for  his  good  works. 


Children  of  Jacob  Schzvenck  and  Magdalcna  Ziegler: 

1.  Catherine  Schwenk,  born  September  9,  1818;  married  December 

19,  1839,  Abraham  Steiner.  He  conducted  a  grist  and  oil 
mill  on  the  Perkiomen  Creek  near  CoUegeville.  Later 
removed  to  Philadelphia,  where  he  died  in  1893.  His  wife 
died  in  1891,  and  both  are  buried  at  Boehm's  Church 
Cemetery  near  Blue  Bell,  Montgomery  County,  Pa. 

2.  ELIZABETH    ZIEGLER    SCHWENK,    born    September    24, 

1821;  died  October  11,  1907;  married  REUBEN  Y. 
STRASSBURGER. 


THE  SCHWENK  FAMILY  313 

Children  of  Jacob  Schzvenck  and  Mary  Gehman  (Landis)  : 

Jacob  G.  Schwenk,  born  January  31,  1825 ;  married  Mary,  daugh- 
ter of  Charles  Hendricks,  of  Worcester  Township,  Mont- 
gomery County,  Pa.,  born  September  8,  1829.  He  pur- 
chased his  father's  store,  which  he  conducted  for  many 
years,  doing  an  extensive  business,  and  it  was  under  his 
career  that  the  post  ofifi.ce  was  changed  from  Schwenck's 
Store  to  Schwenkville.  He  was  an  active  member  of  the 
Lutheran  Church.  About  1872,  he  sold  his  store  and 
removed  to  Philadelphia,  where  he  died  March  5,  1889. 
His  wife  died  October  10,  1895  ;  both  are  buried  in  Schwenk- 
ville Cemetery. 

Abraham  G.  Schwenk,  born  June  4,  1826;  married  Elizabeth 
Stauffer,  of  Berks  County,  Pa.  After  his  father's  death 
he  became  owner  of  the  hotel  and  farm  and,  about  1860, 
laid  out  the  town  of  Schwenkville.  With  his  brother-in-law, 
Reuben  Y.  Strassburger,  he  established  the  coal  and  lumber 
firm  of  Schwenk  and  Strassburger.  Mr.  Schwenk  was  an 
active  member  of  the  Lutheran  Church,  being  President  of 
the  Vestry  until  his  death,  which  occurred  October  14,  1899. 
His  wife  died  November  1,  1909,  and  both  are  buried  in 
Schwenkville  Cemetery. 

Mary  Gehman  Schwenk,  born  February  25,  1828 ;  married  Octo- 
ber 26,  1848,  Dr.  Henry  A.  Geiger,  born  June  2,  1826.  He 
practiced  medicine  at  Harleysville  for  a  number  of  years, 
then  removed  to  Philadelphia  and  engaged  in  the  whole- 
sale grocery  business  on  Third  Street,  in  company  with 
his  brother-in-law,  John  G.  Schwenk  and  Samuel  Horn- 
ing, under  the  firm  name  of  Geiger,  Schwenk  and  Horning. 
After  a  number  of  successful  years  in  business,  in  which  time 
he  had  accumulated  a  large  fortune,  his  health  failed  and 
he  retired  from  active  business.  He  was  elected  Vice- 
President  of  the  Fifth  and  Sixth  Street  Passenger  Railway 
Company,  which  position  he  held  until  his  death.  Dr. 
Geiger  was  a  preacher  in  the  Congregation  of  the  Brethren, 
formerly  called  the  German  Baptists,  and  was  highly 
esteemed  by  all  who  knew  him.  He  died  at  his  home  on 
North  Broad  Street,  Philadelphia,  December  30,  1885,  and 
was  buried  in  the  graveyard  attached  to  the  Church  of 
the  Brethren,  Germantown,  Pa.  Mrs.  Geiger  died  about 
1915. 


314  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

6.  Samuel  G.  Schwenk,  born  February    14,    1813 ;    married    Mary, 

daughter  of  John  Funk,  of  Towamensing,  Pa.  He  studied 
medicine  under  Dr.  Henry  A.  Geiger,  at  Harleysville,  Pa., 
and  practiced  his  profession  at  Hilltown,  Bucks  County, 
for  some  years,  and  then  removed  to  Schwenkville,  where  he 
died  April  24,  1863.    Buried  in  Schwenkville  Cemetery. 

7.  John  G.  Schwenk,  born  September  15,  1831 ;  married  December 

30,  1858,  Emeline,  daughter  of  Peter  and  Angeline  Spare. 
She  was  born  June  3,  1830.  He  owned  and  conducted  for 
a  number  of  years  a  store  of  general  merchandise  near  the 
east  end  of  Perkiomen  bridge,  Collegeville,  then  sold  it  to 
his  brother,  Henry,  and  removed  to  Philadelphia  to  engage 
in  the  grocery  business  with  his  brother-in-law.  Dr.  Geiger. 
He  died  at  his  home  on  North  Broad  Street,  April  14,  1904, 
and  was  buried  in  Augustus  Lutheran  churchyard,  Trappe, 
Pa. 

8.  Henry  G.  Schwenk,  born  June  17,  1840;  married  May  11,  1864, 

Lydia  Keeler,  who  was  born  January  25,  1841.  He  pur- 
chased the  store  and  dwelling  of  his  brother,  John,  near 
the  east  end  of  Perkiomen  bridge,  Collegeville.  He  died 
June  21,  1889,  and  was  buried  in  the  Lutheran  churchyard 
at  Trappe. 

DESCENT  FROM  HANS  MICHAEL  SCHWENCK. 

VIII.  Hans  Michael  Schwenck  married  Mary  Elizabeth . 

VII.  George  Schwenck  married  Veronica  Markley. 

VI.  Abraham  Schwenck  married  Fronica  Bauer. 

V.  Jacob  Schwenk  married  Magdalena  Ziegler. 

IV.  Elizabeth  Schwenk  married  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger. 

HI.  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Mary  Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


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The  BAUER  FAMILY 


HANS  BAUER,  a  native  of  Switzerland,  emigrated  to  Penn- 
sylvania between  the  years  1708  and  1717.  He  was  a 
Mennonite,  and,  like  many  others  of  that  faith,  fled  from 
the  old  country  to  escape  persecution.  He  settled  in  what  is  now 
Berks,  then  a  part  of  Philadelphia  County,  where  he  acquired 
two  tracts  of  land  lying  in  what  was  then  Colebrookdale,  Phila- 
delphia County,  but  now  in  Hereford  Township,  Berks  County. 

In  1728  a  public  road  was  laid  out  from  Skippack  to  Cole- 
brookdale, though  this  district  had  been  settled  prior  to  that  date, 
but  it  was  then  far  out  on  the  frontier  and  in  constant  danger  of 
attack  from  the  Indians.  On  May  10  of  the  last-named  year  the 
people  living  in  this  region  becoming  alarmed  at  rumors  that 
hostile  bands  of  savages  were  in  the  neighborhood,  sent  the  follow- 
ing petition  to  Governor  Gordon  at  Philadelphia:^ 

To  the  Hon^ble  Patrick  Gordon,   Esq',   Govern''  of  the  Province  of 

Pennsilvania 

The  Petition  of  the  Frontier  Inhabitants  of  ye  County  of  Philadelphia, 

humbly  Sheweth : 

WHEREAS,  Your  Petitioners  are  at  Present  so  Alarmed  by  a  Nois 
of  Indians  That  Several  Families  have  Left  their  Plantations  with  what 
Effects  they  Could  Possibly  Carry  away;  Women  in  Child  bed  being 
forced  To  Expose  themselves  To  Coldness  of  ye  air,  whereby  Their  Lives 
are  in  Danger: 

We,  Your  Petitioners,  Therefore  humbly  Pray  That  Your  Hon"" 
would  Be  Pleased  To  Take  or  use  Such  Measures  with  ye  Indians  That 
Your  Petitioners  may  be  freed  from  These  alarms,  for  yet  we  are 
Informed  That  The  Indians  are  Consulting  Measures  against  us.  We 
hope  your  Hon"^  will  Comply  With  our  Humble  Request,  To  prevent  as 
well  our  fears  as  Danger,  and  yo"^  Petitioners  as  in  Duty  Bound  shall 
Ever  pray,  &c. 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  First  Series,  Volume  I,  pp.  128-129. 


316  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

We  do  not  have  the  list  of  those  who  signed  this  petition,  so  it 
is  not  known  if  Hans  Bauer  had  located  here  as  early  as  1728. 

According  to  I,  Daniel  Rupp,  the  historian,  there  were  four 
hundred  and  sixty-five  German,  Dutch  and  French  inhabitants 
in  Philadelphia  County  who  owned  land  and  paid  quit  rent  prior 
to  1734.  Among  the  eighteen  land  owners  mentioned  as  residing 
in  Colebrookdale  Tow^nship  were  Hans  Bauer  and  Michael  Bauer.^ 

The  first  record  we  have  concerning  Hans  Bauer  is  a  warrant, 
dated  January  29,  1734,  for  a  tract  of  land  containing  one  hundred 
and  fifty  acres,  situated  on  the  Perkiomen,  near  the  Goshenhoppen 
Creek,  which  was  surveyed  and  laid  out  to  him  on  March  18  of  the 
same  year.  A  patent  was  granted  to  him  by  the  Proprietaries  of 
the  Commonwealth  March  30,  1736.  This  land  was  part  of  the 
Great  Manatawny  tract  owned  by  the  Frankfort  Land  Company. 

Patent  to  Hans  Bower,  1736 

JOHN  PENN,  THOMAS  PENN  and  RICHARD  PENN,  Esquires, 
true  and  absolute  Proprietaries  and  Governors  in  Chief  of  the  Province 
of  Pennsylvania,  and  Counties  of  New  Castle,  Kent  and  Sussex  on  Dela- 
ware. To  all  unto  whom  these  Presents  shall  come.  Greeting: 
WHEREAS  in  Pursuance  and  by  Virtue  of  our  Warrant  under  the 
lesser  seal  of  our  said  Province,  bearing  date  the  twenty-ninth  day  of 
January  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  thirty- 
four  there  was  surveyed  and  laid  out  on  the  eighteenth  day  of  March 
then  next  ensuing  unto  bans  Bower  of  the  County  of  Philadelphia,  a  cer- 
tain Tract  of  land  situate  on  a  Branch  of  Perkiomen  Creek  near  Cowis- 
hoppen  in  the  said  County,  adjoining  lands  of  Humphrey  Hill,  contain- 
ing one  hundred  and  fifty  acres.  Now  at  the  Instance  and  request  of 
the  said  hans  Bower  that  we  would  be  pleased  to  grant  him  a  Confirma- 
tion of  the  same,  Know  ye  that  *  *  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of 
twenty-five  pounds  five  shillings  to  us  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  hans 
Bower  *  *  We  have  given,  granted,  released  and  confirmed  unto  the 
said  hans  Bower  and  his  heirs  the  said  one  hundred  and  fifty  acres.  *  * 
Given  at  Philadelphia  the  thirtieth  day  of  March,  one  thousand  seven 
hundred  and  thirty-six,  and  in  the  ninth  year  of  the  reign  of  George  the 
Second  over  Great  Britain  and  the  eighteenth  year  of  our  Government.^ 

Thomas  Penn      SS. 


1  I.  D.  Rupp,  Thirty  Thousand  Names,  pp.  470-471. 

2  Patent  Book  A,  No.  7,  p.  548.     Department  of  Internal  Affairs.     Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. 


THE  BAUER  FAMILY  317 

On  November  30,  1742,  Hans  Bauer,  or  John  Bower,  as  he 
appears  in  this  record,  secured  by  patent  another  tract  of  about 
105  acres  situated  in  the  valley  known  as  "Butter-tahl"  in  Cole- 
brookdale  Township/ 

He  purchased  of  Thomas  Hopkinson,  trustee  for  the  heirs  of 
Humphrey  Hill,  March  14,  1743,  one  hundred  and  thirty-four 
acres,  part  of  a  tract  at  that  time  described  as  Douglass  Manor, 
which  was  also  on  a  branch  of  the  Perkiomen  Creek."  These  last 
two  farms  lay  within  the  old  limits  of  Colebrookdale,  but  fell  into 
Hereford  when  that  township  was  erected  in  1753. 

These  two  townships  were  settled  by  a  colony  of  Mennonites 
who  soon  erected  a  meeting  house,  1743-4,  which  still  stands.  It  is 
a  low  wooden  structure,  little  larger  than  the  ordinary  schoolhouse, 
with  joists  extending  far  across  the  walls  and  the  roof  resting  upon 
the  same.  It  is  known  as  the  Hereford  and  Colebrookdale  Men- 
nonite  Meeting  House,  and  has  a  cemetery  in  which  many  of  the 
old  settlers  were  buried.^ 

Hans  Bauer  made  a  will,  written  in  German,  which  he  signed 
on  October  27,  1748,  wherein  he  devised  to  his  sons,  Samuel, 
Abraham  and  Michael,  all  of  his  lands.  He  had  given  to  his  son, 
Hans,  part  of  his  Colebrookdale  farm,  but  Hans  died  in  the  spring 
of  1747,  leaving  a  widow,  Magdalena,  and  two  small  children, 
Abraham  and  Anna  Barbara.''  Hans,  senior,  also  bequeathed 
this  farm  to  his  sons  Abraham  and  Michael  on  condition  that  they 
pay  to  the  widow  and  the  two  minor  children  of  their  deceased 
brother  a  sum  equal  to  the  value  of  the  land.    This  will  reads: 

Will  of  Hans  Bower,  1748 

IN  THE  NAME  OF  GOD  AMEN  Whereas  1  Hans  Bower  of  Cole- 
brookdale in  the  county  of  Philadelphia  Yeoman  do  find  myself  very  weak 
as  to  Bodily  Health  but  of  sound  and  perfect  mind  and  memory  blessed 
be  the  Lord  for  the  same,  AND  considering  the  uncertainty  of  this 
Transitory  Life  and  the  present  weakness  o.f  my  Body,  have  therefore  as 


1  Rev.   Henry   S.    Bower,  History  of   the   Stauffer  and  Bower  Families,   1897, 
pp.  65,  66. 

2  Commission  Book  P-1,  p.   179,   Reading,   Pennsylvania. 

3  Morton  L.  Montgomery,  History  of  Berks  County,  Pennsylvania,  p.  1003. 
*  Will  Book  H,  p.  253.     Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


318  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Customary  resolved  to  Order  and  Settle  my  Worldly  affairs  and  to  Make 
this  my  Last  Will  &  Testam*  and  I  do  hereby  make  the  Same  and  desire 
the  same  may  be  taken  and  accounted  as  such,  And  the  same  is  as  fol- 
lows IMPRIMIS  I  do  ordain  concerning  my  beloved  Wife  That  she 
shall  during  her  Natural  Life  have  Lodging  and  free  Priviledge  to  live  in 
my  dwelling  House  and  on  This  My  Plantation  where  I  now  Dwell,  as 
also  all  Necessarys  of  Life,  in  victuals  and  Apparell  &c :  all  which  my 
two  sons  Michael  and  Abraham  shall  sufficiently  Provide  for  her  out  of 
my  s^  Plantation  AND  furthermore  That  if  my  said  Wife  should  not 
like  to  stay  here  on  my  Plantation  then  they  shall  so  Sufficiently  Pro- 
vide for  her  in  manner  aforesaid,  at  the  Place,  where  she  shall  Choose  to 
Live,  which  Liberty  she  shall  have.     ITEM  I  give  and  devise  unto  my 
Son  Samuel  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  for  ever  all  That  Piece  of  Land  unto 
him  already  Surveyed  and  whereon  he  now  lives  Together  with  all  Build- 
ings, Improvements  &  all  the  Appurtenances  thereunto  belonging  in  Con- 
sideration whereof  and  of  such  Sums  he  owed  me  before  he  shall  pay 
to  my  wife  the  sum  of  Thirty  seven  Pound  Eight  Shillings   ITEM  I  give 
and  devise  unto  my  two  sons  Michael  and  Abraham  their  Heirs  and 
Assigns  forever  in  Equal  parts  All  that  Plantation  whereon  I  now  Live 
Together  with  all  my  other  Lands  whatsoever  in  my  Possession  and  all 
my  Cattle  great  and  small  and  the  Household  goods  which  I  heretofore 
gave  unto  them  in  Possession  in  consideration  whereof  they  shall  Pro- 
vide for  my  said  Wife  Anne  in  manner  aforesaid  and  they  shall  also  pay 
unto  my  said  Wife  the  Sum  of  one  hundred  seventy  two  Pound  twelve 
Shillings  And  as  I  had  formerly  reserved  Some  Cattle  and  Creatures  for 
myself  out  of  these  I  heretofore  give  unto  them  in  Possession  as  afore- 
said such  Creatures  shall  after  mine  and  my  Wife's  Decease  be  Equally 
divided  amongst  our  Children     AND  WHEREAS  there  is  an  Improve- 
ment on  part  of  last  mentioned  Land  which  I  formerly  gave  into  the  pos- 
session of  my  Son  Hans  now  Deceased,  which  s^  Improvement  I  valued 
then  at  Forty  Pound  which  should  have  been  a  part  of  his  share  in  my 
Estate.     AND  WHEREAS  after  my  said  son  Hans  decease,  I  did  redeem 
the  said  Improvement  for  Sixty  pound,  which  said  Improvement  I  do 
hereby  Intirely  give  unto  my  said  two  Sons  Michael  and  Abraham  and 
their  Heirs  forever,  They  paying  the  Sum  of  Forty  Pounds  unto  the  two 
Children  of  the  said  Hans  dec'ed  and  Twenty  Pounds  |  as  the  Remainder  | 
all  Lawfull  Money  of  this  Province  according  to  the  Last  Will  of  my 
said  Son  Deceased  unto  his  Widow  and  Relict  and  his  said  two  Children 
in  Equal  parts   AND  WHEREAS  my  said  son  deceased  did  by  his  Last 
Will  &  Testam*  Constitute  me  as  one  of  the  Executors  and  (Inter  alia) 
Entrusted  me  with  the  Care  and  Education  of  his  son  Abraham.     It  is 
therefore  my  Strict  Will  That  he  shall,  according  to  the  Intent  of  the  said 


THE  BAUER  FAMILY  319 

recited  Will,  be  Educated  and  maintained  by  my  said  two  Sons  Michael 
and  Abram  And  if  he  should,  through  the  Distemper  or  ffits  he  is  now 
affected  with,  become  Indigent,  I  oblige  all  my  Children  Equally  to  main- 
tain him,  and  when  he  arrive  to  the  age  of  twenty  one  years  my  said  two 
sons  Michael  and  Abraham  shall  give  him  a  Horse  to  the  value  of  six 
Pounds  they  having  an  allowance  made  unto  them  by  me  for  the  same: 
UNTO  my  Daughter  Barbara  I  give  the  Sum  of  Forty  Pounds  Money 
and  ffifteen  Pounds  worth  in  household  goods  and  unto  my  Daughter 
Susannah  I  give  also  the  Sum  of  Forty  Pounds  in  Money  and  fifteen 
Pounds  in  Household  Goods,  which  said  Sums  and  Goods  my  s^  two 
Sons  Michael  and  Abraham  shall  pay  and  give  unto  their  said  two  sisters 
when  they  marry  |  as  is  Barbara's  Case  already  |  Further  as  concerning 
the  above  s'^  Sums  w'^'^  my  said  Son  Samuel  as  well  as  my  said  Sons 
Michael  and  Abraham  are  to  pay  unto  my  said  Wife  Anne  as  above  s*^ 
all  the  Use  thereof  shall  be  for  her  use  during  her  Life  and  after  her 
decease  the  same  and  all  remainder  shall  be  Equally  divided  among  my 
children.  It  is  also  to  be  Remembered  that  Barbara  has  already  received 
the  sum  of  Seven  pounds  ffourteen  Shillings  in  part  of  her  abovesaid 
share  And  Susannah  has  likewise  received  the  sum  of  two  Pounds  ffour- 
teen Shillings  in  part  of  her  said  share,  and  my  said  Daughter  Susannah 
shall  also  have  the  old  Iron  Stove  a  Cow  our  Chest  and  our  Bed  besides 
her  Share  And  my  said  son  Samuel  shall  have  the  sum  of  Seven  Pound 
Eight  Shillings,  besides  what  I  have  given  unto  him  before  whom  I  like- 
wise Together  with  my  Trusty  Friend  George  Sholtz  of  Upper  Hanover 
Weaver  do  Nominate  and  Constitute  to  be  the  two  Executors  this  my 
Last  Will  and  Testament  Giving  hereby  unto  the  said  George  Sholtz  full 
authority  in  my  stead  and  Behalf  to  Sign  Seal  Execute  &  Confirm  Titles 
unto  my  said  Sons  respectively  |  My  Deed  being  for  that  purpose  al- 
ready Delivered  unto  a  Clerk  |  for  my  Land  unto  them  above  devised 
IN  WITNESS  whereof  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and  Seal  the  27^^ 
Day  of  October  in  the  Year  of  our  Lord  1748.^ 

Signed  Sealed  Published  and  Hans  Bauer. 

Declared  by  the  said  Hans 
Bower  as  his  Last  Will  and 
Testament  in  the  presence 
of  us 

Johann  Conrad 

Bob  George  Sholtze 

Christopher  Sholtze. 


1  Will  Book  I,  p.  77,  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


320  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

The  above  was  Translated  from  the  German  language  into  the  Eng- 
lish by  Christopher  Lehman. 

Be  it  Remembered  that  on  the  7th  day  of  March  1748/49.  the  Last 
Will  and  Testament  of  Hans  Bower,  dec'd  was  proved  in  due  form  of 
Law  &  Probate  and  Lres  Testamentary  were  granted  to  the  Exec" 
therein  named. 

W^  Plum  STEAD,  Reg""  Gen^ 

This  will  was  proved  at  Philadelphia  the  7th  day  of  March, 
1748,  so  that  Hans  Bauer,  Senior,  died  some  time  between  the 
27th  day  of  October,  1748,  and  the  7th  day  of  March,  1748/9,  and 
was  no  doubt  buried  in  the  graveyard  of  the  Hereford  Mennonite 
Church.  His  wife,  Anne,  surname  unknown,  was  living  at  the 
time  of  his  decease,  but  nothing  further  is  known  concerning  her. 
In  his  will  he  bequeathed  to  his  sons,  Abraham  and  Michael,  all 
the  homestead  plantation  on  condition  that  they  care  and  provide 
for  her  in  a  suitable  manner. 

Children  of  Hans  and  Anne  Bauer: 

1.  Samuel  Bauer.     His  father  bequeathed  to  him  a  tract  of  land 

which  was  patented  to  Samuel,  February,  1748/9.^ 

2.  Hans  Bauer,  married  Magdalena .     He  died  in  the  spring 

of    1747,  leaving  two  small  children,   Abraham   and   Anna 
Barbara. 

3.  Abraham  Bauer,  married  Anna .    Received  from  his  father 

one-half  of  the  homestead  farm  in  Colebrookdale.    Removed 
in  1752  to  Huntingdon  County,  Pa. 

4.  MICHAEL     BAUER,     married     about    1744-5,    VERONICA 

LANDIS. 

5.  Barbara  Bauer. 

6.  Susannah  Bauer. 

MICHAEL  BAUER,  or  BOWER,  son  of  Hans  Bauer,  was 
born  circa  \1 20-1122,  and  married,  about  1744,  Veronica  (or 
Fronica)  Landis,  daughter  of  Johannes  Landis,  of  Bucks  County, 
Pa.     His  father  by  will  bequeathed  to  him  one-half  of  the  farm 


1  Patent  Book  P-8,  p.  363.     Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania. 


ilALPH   B.   STRASSBURGER,    L lEUTENANT, .U.S.N,  

lias  hccii  clulv  elected  <i  imiuhcrol^  tlic 

War  wS()(  ii:tv 

or  Tin: 

(  Riisi-R  A\i)  Transport  I\)R(  i: 

In  T|-STI.M(),\V  WIII.KKOI-,  iIk-  ilmucs  <>rtlK-  proper 
oH-iccis  ami  the  se.il  el  flie  SoeietN'  are  iiereimri'  altiveJ 
Dated  JUNE    13,    1919. 

^^'^  ■  -  :^^^ 


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LOUISVILLE 


Certificate    issued    by    Rear    Admiral    Albert    Cleaves,    U.    S. 

Navy.  Cominander-in-Cbief  of  the  Transport  Service, 

to  Lieitteiiant  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger, 

United  States  Navv. 


THE  BAUER  FAMILY  321 

upon  which  he  resided,  the  other  half  being  given  to  his  brother 
Abraham.  George  Schultz,  executor  of  the  will  of  Hans  Bauer, 
Sr.,  by  a  deed  of  April  6,  1749,  transferred  to  the  two  brothers 
the  one  hundred  and  fifty  acres  comprising  the  homestead  farm, 
the  widow  of  Hans  Bauer,  Junior,  deceased,  and  Samuel,  the  eldest 
brother,  releasing  their  right  to  the  land,  which  all  lay  within  the 
confines  of  Colebrookdale. 

In  1753  a  petition  was  presented  to  the  Court  at  Philadelphia 
asking  for  the  erection  of  a  new  township  to  be  bounded  and  de- 
scribed as  follows:  "Beginning  at  a  heap  of  stones  on  land  of 
Adam  Trump,  being  chief  corner  of  Philadelphia  County  in  the 
line  of  Northampton  County,  bounded  by  Colebrookdale  Town- 
ship, etc.,  to  be  named  Hereford."  The  petition  was  signed  by 
seventeen  inhabitants.^ 

Adam  Bauer 

Samuel  Bauer 

Melchoir  Schultz 

Christopher  Schultz 

Benedict  Strohm 

Jacob  Stauffer 

Michael  Bauer 

and  others 
Among  the  Hereford  taxables  for  1758  are  Abraham  Bauer 
and  Michael  Bauer.^    And  in  1759  we  find  Michael  Bauer  paying 
taxes  on  fourteen  acres;   Samuel  Bauer  on  thirteen  acres,   and 
Widow  Bauer  on  twelve  acres. ^ 

Michael  Bauer  died  between  June  17  and  November  8,  1784. 
His  will,  recorded  at  Reading,  Pennsylvania,  was  written  in  Ger- 
man. The  following  is  the  English  translation  filed  with  the 
original: 

Will  of  Michael  Bauer,  1784 

In  the  Name  of  God  Amen  I  Michael  Bauer  of  Hereford  Town- 
ship in  Berks  County  &  State  of  Penn^  Farmer,  finding  myself  Thank 
God  at  present  yet  of  good  Health  But  taking  in  Consideration  the  Mor- 


1  Morton  L.  Montgomery,  History  of  Berks  County,  Pennsylvania,  p.  996. 

2  I.  D.  Rupp,  History  of  Berks  County,  Pennsylvania,  p.  224. 

3  Morton  L.  Montgomery,  History  of  Berks  County,  Pennsylvania,  p.  996. 


322  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

tality  of  my  Body  &  that  it  is  Just  that  I  Concerning  the  Worldly  Effects 
wherewith  God  hath  blessed  me  to  leave  behind  a  Satisfactory  Acknowl- 
edgement So  I  make  &  Declare  herewith  my  Last  will  &  Testament  this 
17th  day  of  June  in  the  year  of  the  Lord  One  thousand  seven  hundred 
&  Eighty  four  and  desire  that  from  all  persons  it  may  be  held  therefore 
as  follows : 

Firstly  it  is  my  Will  that  all  my  just  Debts  shall  be  paid  off  and  I 
give  and  Construe  to  my  Loving  wife  Fronica  the  sum  of  One  hundred 
pounds  good  Current  Money  further  I  give  to  her  the  possession  &  Bene- 
fit of  all  and  each  single  actual  &  exception  So  I  having  excepted,  for  me 
and  my  wife,  On  my  plantation,  as  I  Left  &  give  over  to  my  Eydam  (son- 
in-law)  Christian  Meyer,  that  she  make  use  of  the  same  With  all  right 
and  Authority  belonging  thereto  as  long  as  she  lives  agreeable  to  her 
option  Also  I  give  her  all  Chattle  which  I  leave  behind  at  my  Departure 
as  also  each  &  all  Household  .furniture  (furniture  &  dishes)  so  I  having 
in  my  Dwelling  House  or  will  have,  But  all  sums  of  money  which  aris- 
ing out  of  the  leaving  and  quitting  of  my  plantation  Which  after  the 
Deduction  of  the  above  specified  one  hundred  pounds  at  present  yet 
come  to  Four  hundred  £.  The  same  I  bequeath  &  give  to  my  only  [  ?] 
Daughter  Anna  Meyer  to  her  and  her  husbands  use  &  benefit  as  long  as 
my  said  Daughter  is  alive.  After  her  death  I  give  and  order  the  said 
money  to  my  said  Daughters  own  ofspring  Children  in  equal  shares  the 
one  as  much  as  the  other.  It  having  equal  meaning  &  Consequence  & 
it  shall  have  with  the  inheritance  all  the  goods  &  Estate  which  my  said 
Loving  Wife  Fronica  will  Leave  behind  at  her  Departure  that  it  likewise 
Also  shall  remain  &  be  given  over  to  my  Daughter  &  her  Bodily  Heirs 
And  I  nominate  &  appoint  My  said  Son-in-law  Christian  IMeyer  &  my 
Loving  friend  &  Neighbour  John  Bechtel  as  Executors  of  this  my  Last 
Will  &  Testament  In  trusting  the  true  state  &  Meaning  thereof.  In  wit- 
ness of  all  that  I  have  hereunto  put  my  Hand  &  Seal  the  day  &  year  above 
mentioned.^ 

his 
Signed  Sealed  &  Declared  through  Michal  M  B    Bauer 

the  named  Michael  Bauer  for  his  mark 

last  will  &  Testament  in  the 
presence  of  us 

George  Landes 

Abraham  Becktel 


1  Original   Will    (English   Translation).     Recorded   in    German   in   Will    Book 
No.  3,  p.  50.     Register  of  Wills,  Reading,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  BAUER  FAMILY  323 

A    true    Translation    of    the    German    Original.     (A    very    poor 
translation.) 
Proved  November  8,  1784. 

Anna,  daughter  of  Michael  and  Fronica  Landis  Bauer,  mar- 
ried Christian  Moyer,  or  Meyer.  On  July  7,  1784,  Michael  and 
his  wife  made  over  to  Christian  Moyer  and  his  wife,  Anna,  for 
£175,  the  seventy-five  acres  which  was  his  share  of  the  homestead 
tract.  The  next  day,  July  8,  Christian  Meyer  assigned  to  Michael 
and  his  wife,  Fronica,  an  annuity,  or  yearly  rent  charge,  of  £100, 
issuing  out  of  two  houses  and  plantations  in  Hereford  Township, 
evidently  the  personal  property  of  Christian,  the  agreement  being 
that  Michael  and  Fronica  would  reside  in  the  "new  dwelling  now 
being  erected"  on  one  of  the  farms. 

Deed:  Michael  and  Fronica  Bower  to  Christian  Meyer,  1784 

Cf)i0  Jn Denture  Made  the  Seventh  day  of  July  in  the  year  o.f 
our  Lord  One  thousand  Seven  Hundred  and  Eighty  four  Between  Michael 
Bower  of  Hereford  Township  in  Berks  County  and  State  of  Pennsylva- 
nia, Yeoman,  and  Fronica  his  wife  of  the  one  Part  and  Christian  Meyer 
of  the  same  place,  yeoman,  of  the  other  Part.  Whereas  Samuel  Bower 
and  George  Schultz  Executors  of  the  last  will  and  Testament  of  Hans 
Bower  deceased  by  Virtue  of  an  Authority  in  the  same  Will  dated 
the  27th  day  of  October  Anno  Domini  1748,  By  his  Deed  of  the  Sixth 
day  of  April  1749,  Did  grant  Certain  One  hundred  and  fifty  acres 
and  allowance  of  6  pc  unto  the  said  Michael  Bower  and  to  his  brother 
Abraham  Bower  undivided  and  in  equal  parts  in  Severalty  to  them 
their  Heirs  and  Assigns  for  Ever  the  said  one  hundred  and  fifty 
Acres  being  .formerly  granted  unto  the  said  Hans  Bower  by  Patent 
of  the  30th  day  of  March  A°  d""  1736,  *  *  *  And  the  said  one  hun- 
dred and  fifty  acres  were  released  unto  the  said  Michael  Bower  and 
Abraham  Bower  by  Anna  Bower  and  Samuel  Bower  |  Widow  and  eldest 
son  of  the  said  Hans  Bower  |  by  their  Release  of  the  7th  day  of  April 
1749,  Endorsed  on  the  first  above  recited  deed  and  the  said  Michael 
Bower  and  Abraham  Bower  having  afterwards  divided  the  said  one  hun- 
dred and  fifty  acres  between  themselves  by  Which  division  seventy  four 
acres  and  twenty  eight  perches  and  the  Usual  Allowance  of  Six  pc  here- 
inafter described  were  allotted  to  be  and  remain  as  the  Own  and  Proper 
Share  of  the  said  Michael  Bower  and  by  an  Indenture  of  Release  of  the 
said  Abraham  Bower  and  Anna  his  Wife  bearing  date  the  26th  day  of 
December  An°  Dom'  1751   for  the  Consideration  therein  mentioned  the 


324  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

said  Seventy  four  acres  and  twenty  eight  perches  *  *  were  fully  granted 
and  Confirmed  unto  the  said  Michael  Bower  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  for 
Ever  *  *  *  NOW  THIS  INDENTURE  WITNESSETH  that  for 
and  in  Consideration  of  the  Sum  of  One  hundred  and  Seventy  five 
Pounds  in  specie  unto  them  the  said  Michael  Bower  and  Fronica  his 
wife  in  Hand  Well  and  truly  paid  by  the  said  Christian  Meyer  *  * 
he  the  said  Michael  Bower  and  Fronica  his  wife  have  granted,  bargained, 
sold,  released  and  Confirmed     *  *  *  *     ^nto  the  said  Christian  Meyer 

*  *  All  that  above  mentioned  Tract  of  Seventy  four  acres  and  twenty 
eight  perches  *  *  situate  in  Hereford  Township  |  formerly  taken  to  be 
in  Colebrookdale  |  adjoining  lands  o.f  Frantz  Latshars,  George  Zern, 
other  land  of  said  Michael  Bower,  land  of  Abraham  Bower,  now  Isaac 
Bower  *  *  Together  with  all  *  *  *  *  hereditaments  and  appurten- 
ances unto  the  said  described  Seventy  four  Acres  and  twenty  eight 
perches  *  *  And  the  free  and  uninterrupted  Liberty  and  Privilege  and 
Use  of  a  Road  two  perches  wide  Extending  from  the  land  herein  granted 

*  *  over  the  said  Abraham  Bowers  next  adjoining  allotment  *  *  along 
the  outside  line  of  the  said  Isaac  Bowers  land  between  him  and  Frantz 
Latshars  land  *  *  to  another  allotment  or  tract  of  one  hundred  and 
eight  acres  of  the  said  Michael  Bower  thereunto  adjoining  to  be  forever 
left  open  to  and  for  the  Use  of  the  said  Christian  Meyer  his  heirs  and 
Assigns  forever  *  *  In  Witness  whereof  the  said  Parties  to  these  Pres- 
ents have  Interchangeably  set  their  Hands  and  Seals  hereunto  Dated  the 
Day  and  Year  first  above  written.^ 

his 
Sealed  and  delivered  in  Michael   M  B    Bower 

the  presence  of  us  mark 

George  Landis  her 

Fronica    F  B    Bower 
mark 

Deed*  July  8,  1784.  Between  Christian  Meyer  of  Hereford 
Township,  Berks  County,  Pennsylania,  yeoman,  and  Michael  Bower  of 
same  place,  yeoman,  and  Fronica  his  wife,  for  divers  good  causes  and 
considerations  and  especially  for  and  in  Consideration  of  the  sum  of  Five 
shillings,  grant  and  confirm  unto  the  said  Michael  Bower  and  Fronica 
his  wife  One  Annuity  or  yearly  Rent  Charge  of  one  hundred  Pounds 
as  to  be  received  taken  had  and  issuing  out  of  two  Messuages  or  Tene- 
ments Plantations  &  tract  of  land  situate  in  the  Township  of  Hereford. 


1  Commission  Book  P,  No.  1,  p.  177.     Reading,  Pennsylvania. 


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Official  commendation  by  Secretary  of  the  Navy  Daniels  of 

Lieutenant  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  for 

services  in  the  \\'orld  A\'ar. 


THE  BAUER  FAMILY  325 

TO  HAVE  AND  TO  HOLD  the  said  annuity  or  yearly  quit  rent 
charge  of  One  hundred  Pounds  unto  the  said  Michael  Bower  and  Fronica 
his  wife  for  and  during  the  Natural  lifes  o.f  y^  said  Michael  Bower  and 
Fronica  his  wife  that  he  the  said  Christian  Meyer  doth  covenant  prom- 
ise and  agree  to  well  truly  pay  unto  the  said  Michael  Bower  and  Fronica 
his  wife  the  said  Annuity  or  yearly  quit  Rent  of  £100  and  also  that  the 
said  Two  Messuages  or  Tenements  Plantations  or  Tracts  of  land  contain- 
ing 182  acres  and  34  perches  to  be  charged  with  the  said  Annuity  which 
shall  from  time  to  time  continue  sufficient  for  the  payment  of  the  said 
annuity  during  the  natural  lives  of  the  said  Michael  Bower  and  Fronica 
his  wife,  Provided  always  nevertheless  that  the  said  Christian  Meyer  shall 
and  do  well  and  truly  allow  give  and  deliver  unto  the  said  Michael  Bower 
and  Fronica  his  wife  during  the  term  of  their  natural  life  all  and  each  of 
the  .following  articles.  A  free  and  uninterrupted  Dwelling  and  Living 
in  the  new  dwelling  house  lately  built  and  erected  *  *  *  Item  the  free 
Use  of  all  the  land  and  meadow  now  under  fence  on  one  of  the  said  two 
Tracts,  etc.  *  *  and  that  the  said  Christian  Meyer  is  hereby  bound  and 
obliged  to  make  proper  provision  that  in  case  Anna  the  Daughter  of  the 
said  Michael  Bower  and  Fronica  his  wife  and  the  wife  of  the  said  Chris- 
tian Meyer  should  survive  her  said  husband  that  after  the  decease  of 
the  said  Michael  Bower  and  Fronica  his  wife  the  said  Anna  shall  be  put 
in  full  Right  and  possession  during  her  natural  life  of  all  and  every  the 
said  articles  contained  provided  and  conditioned  for  in  this  present  Inden- 
ture for  the  said  Michael  Bower  and  Fronica  his  wiie.^ 

The  accompanying  draft  shows  the  extent  and  location  of 
the  land  patented  to  Hans  (John)  Bauer  in  1742,  which  he  devised 
to  his  sons,  Abraham  and  Michael.^ 

A  draught  of  a  Tract  of  Land  situate  in  Hereford  Township  in  the 
County  of  Berks  and  Province  of  Pennsylvania  Granted  by  the  Honb'^ 
the  Proprietaries  to  John  Bower  But  is  now  to  be  conveyed  to  the  Heirs 
of  Abraham  Bower  The  warrant  granted  to  John  Bower  was  dated 
November  30*^^  Anno  1742  formerly  Surveyed  per  Edward  Scull  Con- 
taining one  Hundred  and  four  acres  and  133  perches  of  Land  together 


1  Commission  Book  P,  No.  1,  p.  182.     Reading,  Pennsylvania. 

~  Patent  Book  P-3,  p.  337.    Survey  Book  A-83,  p.  265.  Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania. 


326 


THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


with  the  usual  allowance  at  six  per  cent  for  Roads     Resurveyed  on  the  8'*^ 
Day  of  October  Anno  1761  for  the  Heirs  of  the  said  Abraham  Bower. 

David  Schultze 


'\  1^' 


It  is  probable  that  both  Michael  Bauer  and  his  wife  Veronica 
are  buried  in  the  graveyard  at  Hereford  Mennonite  Meeting  House. 
In  his  will  mention  seems  to  be  made  of  but  one  child,  a  daughter, 
Anna,  wife  of  Christian  Moyer.  It  appears,  however,  that  an 
arrangement  was  made  between  Michael  and  his  wife,  Anna,  that 
the  daughter,  Anna,  and  her  husband,  were  to  care  for  her  ageing 
parents  in  consideration  of  which  they  would  receive,  upon 
Michael's  death,  the  homestead  farm. 


THE  BAUER  FAMILY  327 

Children  of  Michael  Bauer  and  Veronica  Landis:^ 

1.  Samuel  Bauer,  born  August  6,  1746;  died  November  18,  1822; 

married  March  10,  1766,  Elizabeth  Ziegler.  He  was  a  farmer 
of  Douglas  Township,  Berks  County,  and  buried  at  Here- 
ford Mennonite  Meeting  House. 

2.  FRONICA  BAUER,  born  April  10,  1756;  died  September  13, 

1840;  married  ABRAHAM  SCHWENK. 

3.  Anna  Bauer,    married    Christian    Moyer    of    Springfield,    Bucks 

County,  Pa, 

DESCENT  FROM  HANS  BAUER : 

VHI.  Hans  Bauer  married  Anne . 

Vn.  Michael  Bower  married  Veronica  Landis. 

VI.  Fronica  Bower  married  Abraham   Schwenk. 

V.  Jacob  Schwenk  married  Magdalena  Ziegler. 

IV.  Elizabeth  Schwenk  married  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger. 

III.  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Mary  Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


^  Stauffer  and  Bower  Genealogy,  pp.  66,  106,  131. 


The  LANDIS  FAMILY 


Landis. — Bale.     De  gu  au  lion  d'or,  tenant  de  sa  patte  sen.  un 

oiseau  d'arg.  en  pal,  le  tranchant  en  bas. 
Crest.     Un  lion  iss.    d'or.^ 

JOHN  LANDIS,  with  his  brothers,  Benjamin  and  Felix,  came 
to  America  from  the  vicinity  of  Manheim,  Germany,  about 
the  year  1717.  They  were  descendants  of  a  family  from 
the  district  about  Zurich,  Switzerland,^  prominent  in  the  Men- 
nonite  faith,  which  had  suffered  cruel  persecution^  during  the 
Sixteenth  and  Seventeenth  centuries,  and  were  forced  to  seek  refuge 
in  the  German  Palatinate  of  which  Manheim  was  the  capital.  In 
Hirzel,  Switzerland,  stands  an  ancient  Landis  homestead  built  in 
1488.' 

In  the  latter  part  of  the  Sixteenth  century  the  Landis  family, 
among  others  in  Switzerland,  were  noted  for  their  piety  and  were 
therefore  called  Pietists,  or  Mennonites,  being  followers  of  the 
teachings  of  Menno.  They  were  sometimes  called  Ana-baptists. 
After  the  persecution  of  the  Protestants  by  the  Catholics  had  ceased, 
some  of  the  Protestants  of  Switzerland  were  guilty  of  the  same  cruel 
practices  as  were  perpetrated  during  the  Martyrs'  Era.  Various 
edicts  were  issued,  1601-1660,  by  the  Reformed  churches  against 
the  Ana-baptists,  or  Mennonites,  by  which  fines  were  levied,  prop- 
erty was  confiscated,  and  banishment,  and  even  death,  decreed. 
There  were  others,  however,  of  the  Reformed  belief,  especially  the 
regents  of  the  United  Netherlands,  who  exerted  their  influences 
for  the  protection  of  these  innocent  people. 

Hans  Landis,  "a  pious  witness  of  the  Divine  truth,"  was  a 
pietist,  or  Mennonite,  preacher,  who  resided  on  the  Swiss  Rhine 
and  ministered  to  those  who  were  seeking  after  righteousness.  The 
Council  of  Zurich  ordered  his  arrest  hoping  thus  to  stop  his  teach- 


^  Reitstap,  Armorial  Gencrale,  Volume  II,  p.   16. 

2  D.  B.  Landis,  The  Landis  Family  of  Lancaster  County,  Pennsylvania, 

3  T.  Jan  Van  Braght,  Bloedigh  Tooniel,  pp.  1003-1018. 

*  C.  R.  Roberts,  History  of  Lehigh  Coimty,  Pennsylvania,  Volume  III,  p.  780. 


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Passport  Issued  by  the  United  States  to  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  and  Family, 

October  25,  1920. 


THE  LANDIS  FAMILY  329 

ings.  The  good  man  "was  taken  prisoner  by  his  enemies  and  sent 
in  irons  from  Zurich  to  the  Papists  at  Zolothurn."  He  was  liber- 
ated on  this  occasion,  but  was  retaken  and  sent  to  Zurich,  where  he 
was  rigorously  examined  as  to  his  doctrines  and  condemmed  to 
death;  and,  in  September,  1614,  he  was  beheaded  with  a  sword, 
"as  a  true  follower  of  Christ." 

A  letter  written  by  a  preacher  of  Zurich,  dated  July  19-29, 
1659,  describes  the  person  and  character  of  Hans  Landis  and  the 
manner  of  his  execution. 

"  'Hatavier  Salr,  was  present  at  the  decapitation  of  Hans 
Landis,  which  circumstance  is  still  fresh  in  my  memory,  having 
witnessed  it  at  the  Wolfs-statt,  and  the  whole  transaction  seems  as 
vivid  to  me  now  as  though  it  had  transpired  but  a  few  weeks  ago,' 
&c.  In  the  sequel,  he  describes  his  person  and  the  manner  of  his 
death,  as  follows:  'Hans  Landis  was  tall  of  stature,  had  a  long 
black  beard,  a  little  gray,  and  a  masculine  voice.  Being  led  out 
cheerfully  with  a  rope,  to  Wolfs-statt  the  place  of  decollation,  the 
executioner,  Mr.  Paul  Volmar,  let  the  rope  fall,  raised  both  hands 
to  heaven,  and  said:  O!  God  of  mercy,  to  thee  be  it  complained, 
that  you,  Hans,  have  fallen  into  my  hands;  for  God's  sake  forgive 
me  for  what  I  must  do  to  you,  &c.  Hans  consoled  the  executioner, 
saying:  I  have  already  forgiven  you,  may  God  forgive  you  also; 
I  am  well  aware  that  you  must  execute  the  sentence  of  the  magis- 
tracy; be  undismayed  and  see  that  nothing  hinders  you  in  this 
matter,  &c.,  whereupon  he  was  beheaded.  After  he  was  decapitated, 
the  executioner  inquired:  Lord  bailiff  of  the  Kingdom,  have  I 
executed  this  man  according  to  the  imperial  law  and  sentence? 
Otherwise  it  would  be  usual  to  say,  this  poor  man,  &c.,  as  though 
he  considered  that  he  had  died  happy.  The  people  were  of  the 
opinion  that  when  the  executioner  let  the  rope  go  he  wanted  to 
give  Hans  an  opportunity  to  escape;  and,  moreover,  it  was  a  com- 
mon saying  that  if  he  had  run  off  no  one  would  have  pursued  him.' 

"The  following,  from  credible  witnesses  may  be  added,  name- 
ly; that  when  the  oft-mentioned  Hans  Landis  was  awaiting  his 
doom  at  the  place  of  execution,  his  wife  and  child  came  to  him  with 
tears  and  lamentation,  to  bid  him  a  last  farewell.  But  when  he  saw 
them,  he  entreated  them  to  depart,  so  that  his  resolution  to  meet  his 
impending  fate  might  not  be  shaken,  and  his  tranquillity  of  mind 


330  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

disturbed  by  their  tears  and  sorrowing.  This  done,  and  having 
commended  his  soul  to  God,  a  stroke  of  the  sword  put  a  speedy 
termination  to  his  life." 

Although  Hans  Landis  was  the  last  person  in  that  vicinity  to 
be  beheaded  for  religious  convictions,  persecutions  did  not  cease 
with  his  death,  as  the  Martyrs'  Mirror,  or  Bloedigh  Tooniel,  gives 
instances  of  several  others  of  the  name  who  suffered  cruel  treat- 
ment during  the  next  fifty  years. 

In  May,  1637,  "Hans  Landis  the  second,  a  steadfast  minister 
of  the  church  in  Horgerberg  and  his  daughter  Margaretha"  were 
confined  for  more  than  a  year  at  Othenbach,  during  which  time  the 
authorities  confiscated  their  property  selling  it  for  7000  florins. 

Three  years  later,  1640,  Oswald  Landis,  his  wife,  and  two 
daughters-in-law,  were  imprisoned  at  Othenbach,  and  Jacob 
Landis,  son  of  Oswald,  and  all  of  his  family  were  banished.  The 
two  daughters-in-law,  with  their  infants,  escaped  from  prison. 
Having  been  deprived  of  their  property,  they  were  forced  to  wander 
about  in  poverty. 

Felix  Landis,  son  of  Hans  Landis  (beheaded  at  Zurich,  1614), 
was  also  a  member  of  the  church  at  Horgerberg.  He,  too,  was 
committed  to  Othenbach  and  treated  with  merciless  rigor,  for  they 
gave  him  "nothing  to  eat  for  several  days,  so  that  even  some  crim- 
inals, who  were  confined  in  an  adjoining  apartment,  had  compas- 
sion on  him,  and  w^ith  difficulty  conveyed  food  to  him  through  an 
opening  in  the  partition.  The  doorkeepers  observing  this,  he  was 
removed  to  another  prison.  They  at  length  gave  him  some  food, 
but  his  digestive  organs  had  become  so  impaired  by  long-continued 
fasting,  that  his  stomach  refused  to  retain  its  food,  wherefore,  he 
prepared  himself  for  death.  In  this  state  of  weakness  they  carried 
him  to  church  during  the  sermon,  and  (O,  inhuman  act!)  threw 
him  under  a  bench,  where  he  immediately  expired,  having  previ- 
ously commended  his  soul  to  God. 

"His  wife,  Adelheyd  Egli,  was  also  kept  in  durance  in  Othen- 
bach, nearly  four  years.  During  this  period  they  treated  her  not 
only  unmercifully,  but  disgracefully;  they  threw  her  into  several 
offensive  places,  stripped  her  twice  in  irons,  and  for  a  time  took  her 
clothes  from  her  every  night,  &c.  She  afterwards  escaped  from 
prison  with  a  good  conscience.    Meantime,  the  authorities  dispersed 


THE  LANDIS  FAMILY  331 

her  family,  drove  the  children  among  strangers,  and  then  confis- 
cated her  house  and  furniture,  and  sold  them  for  5000  florins.  But 
the  rejected  and  forsaken  consoled  themselves,  according  to  the 
words  of  the  Apostle:  'Ye  took  joyfully  the  spoiling  of  your  goods, 
Knowing  in  yourselves,  that  ye  have  in  heaven  a  better  and  an  en- 
during substance.'  " 

Another  incident  of  interest,  recited  in  the  Martyrs'  Mirror,  is 
the  persecution  and  death  of  one  Verena  Landis,  in  1643.  The 
name  Verena  is  no  doubt  a  variant  of  Veronica,  or  Fronica,  the 
latter  being  a  family  name  carried  by  the  Landis  and  intermarried 
branches,  in  America,  through  many  generations. 

"The  house  of  Verena  Landis,  an  elderly  sister,  was  attacked 
in  the  night  with  such  a  noise  and  tumult,  that  being  greatly 
alarmed,  she  grew  faint  and  sick,  and  in  consequence  of  which 
could  not  go  with  the  beadles.  As  she  could  not  accompany  them, 
she  was  compelled  to  make  a  promise  that  she  would  remain  a 
prisoner  in  her  own  house,  which  promise  she  accordingly  fulfilled. 
However,  as  they  treated  her  very  harshly,  and  supplied  her  with 
very  bad  provisions,  death  was,  in  a  very  short  time,  the  conse- 
quence; thus  she  departed  her  life,  full  of  hope  and  joy;  and  be- 
cause she  suffered  this  for  the  name  of  the  Lord,  he  will  reward  her 
hereafter  with  a  crown  of  everlasting  bliss,  and  free  her  from  eternal 
death,  'And  there  shall  be  no  more  death,  neither  sorrow  nor  crying, 
neither  shall  there  be  any  more  pain;  for  the  former  things  are 

passed  away.'  " 

About  1660,  or  thereabouts,  the  Landis  family  took  refuge  m 
Germany,  some  settling  in  Zwieburg  and  Alsace,  others  locating  in 
the  neighborhood  of  Strasburg,  while  still  others  found  a  home  in 
Manheim  where,  like  the  Palatines,  they  became  cultivators  of  the 

soil. 

It  was  from  the  vicinity  of  Manheim  that  the  three  brothers, 
Benjamin,  Felix,  and  John  Landis,  in  1717,  emigrated  to  Pennsyl- 
vania. Benjamin,  the  eldest,  settled  in  what  is  now  Lancaster 
County,  where  in  1718,  he  received  by  patent  from  the  London 
Company  a  tract  of  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  land  situated 
in  East  Lampeter  Township.  He  was  a  Mennonite  minister  and 
his  house  became  a  refuge  for  many  of  the  Swiss  emigrants  who 
enjoyed  his  hospitality  until  they  were  able  to  secure  homes  of  their 
own. 


332  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Felix  Landis,  brother  of  Reverend  Benjamin  Landis,  received 
a  patent  from  the  London  Company  in  1719-20,  for  four  hundred 
acres  of  land  on  Mill  Creek,  also  in  East  Lampeter  Township. 
He  died  in  1739/ 

John  Landis,  the  third  brother,  settled  in  Bucks  County,  near 
what  is  now  Shelly,^  where  he  died  1749-50.  Very  little  is  known 
of  him,  as  few  records  can  be  found  pertaining  to  him,  particularly 
no  deeds  of  transfer  of  property.  A  persistent  but  futile  search 
was  made  for  the  deed  or  document  referred  to  in  the  Genealogy 
of  the  Bauer  Family,  by  which  the  property  owned  by  John  Landis 
came  into  the  possession  of  the  heirs  of  his  daughter,  Veronica 
Landis  Bauer.  Some  time  prior  to  1738  he  entered  into  an  agree- 
ment with  the  Proprietaries  by  which  one  hundred  acres  of  land 
lying  within  the  Proprietaries'  Manor  of  Richland  in  Bucks 
County,  would  be  granted  to  him  for  which  he  was  to  pay  seven 
shillings  per  acre  and  the  yearly  quit-rent  of  one-half  penny  sterling 
per  acre.  In  1738  this  tract  was  surveyed  to  him,  and  the  following 
year  an  order  of  Warrant  was  issued  returning  and  establishing 
the  survey.  There  is  no  record  of  a  patent  being  granted,  but  the 
following  on  file  in  the  Land  Office  at  Harrisburg  are  of  interest: 

Pennsylvania,  SS :  By  the  Proprietaries  WHEREAS  upon  an 
agreement  heretofore  made  with  John  Landis  of  the  County  of  Bucks 
for  one  hundred  acres  of  land  within  our  Manor  of  Richland  in  the  said 
County  the  same  was  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hun- 
dred and  thirty-eight  accordingly  surveyed  but  not  returned  for  which 
!the  said  John  Landis  is  to  pay  to  our  use  at  the  rate  or  price  of  seven 
shillings  Money  of  Pennsylvania  and  the  yearly  quit-rent  of  one  half 
penny  sterling  for  every  acre  of  the  same,  and  now  requests  that  we  be 
pleased  to  grant  him  our  Warrant  in  Order  for  returning  and  estab- 
lishing the  said  survey.     Dated  at  Philadelphia,  January  30,  1739.''' 

In  pursuance  of  a  verbal  order  from  the  Hon^'^  Thomas  Penn  Esq' 
Surveyed   the  29'^  day   of  December   1738  to  John   Landis  the  above 


^  D.  B.  Landis,  History  of  the  Landis  Family  of  Lancaster  County,  Pennsyl- 
vania, 1888,  pp.  12-14. 

2  C.  R.  Roberts,  History  of  Lehigh  County,  Pennsylvania,  Volume  III,  p.  780. 

3  Survey  Book  D,  No.  83,  p.   159.     Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania. 


SIGNATURE  AND  ADDRESS  OF  BEARER. 


(.-in#iiuri<  ul  bearer,  to  iKi  ;iinxod  inimcii;;!,;..-  uimn  roceipi  lu'  j  v~iH,rt..) 


RENEWAI  S. 

An  Americnn  citizen  residing  in  n  foreign  country  and 
desiring  tlie  c-ctension  of  the  vaUclity  of  his  passport  should 
moke  ap;>!ication  therefof  to  the  nearest  American  diplo- 
matic or  consular  office. 


VERIFICATION'  BEFORE  miU  TO  THE  I'^ITED  STATES. 

This  p.TC-.port  should  be  veriliec:  r.y  r.-A  .-Smerican  aiploniotjc 
or  consular  officer  in  or  near  the  cily  from  which  tho  holder 
starts  on  his  return  trip  to  the  United  S'ntes,  and  cliwj  by 
such  officer  in  the  country  from  which  the  holder  procced.5 
directly  to  the  United  States.  ,    . 


J 


Signature  of  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  Attached  to  Passport, 
October  25.  1920. 


THE  LANDIS  FAMILY  333 

described  tract  of  land — being  part  of  the  Mannor  of  Richland  Situate 
in  the  County  of  Bucks.  Containing  100  &  jia.  with  an  allowance 
of  Six  P  O.' 

NichO  Scull 

The  wife  of  John  Landis  was  Ann,  surname  unknown,  who 
survived  her  husband.     Nothing  is  known  of  their  burial  place. 

John  Landis  made  a  will,  dated  September  26,  1747,  which 
was  probated  May  1,  1750.  It  was  written  in  German  and  in  it  he 
calls  himself  of  "Lower  Millford  Township,"  Bucks  County.^ 

Will  of  John  Landus,  1750 

Lower  Millford  Township  in  Bucks  County  Dated  the  26'^  Day 
of  September  1747.  I  John  Landus  being  at  present  of  sound  under- 
standing have  made  this  my  Last  Will  and  Testament  in  manner 
following,  First  I  do  give  my  Lands,  namely,  one  Hundred  and  twenty 
five  acres  with  the  Improvements  unto  my  Son  Samuel  Landus  That  is 
to  say,  for  one  hundred  and  fifty  Pounds  of  w'^^  he  shall  draw  a  share. 
Secondly  I  John  Landus  do  hereby  give  unto  my  wife  Ann  Landus 
(beside  her  share)  our  Bed  and  Bedstead  two  Cows  of  her  Choosing 
amongst  my  Cows  and  the  Still  Kettle,  and  one  Horse  (Paul)  of  my 
Horses,  and  three  Sheep.  Further  I  do  give  unto  my  wife  one  third 
part  of  all  my  Estate  real  and  Personal  be  it  Lands  or  Cattle  or  any 
other  thing.  Further  shall  she  dureing  her  widowhood,  have  Room 
and  Priviledge  to  live  on  my  Land  in  my  House  and  of  the  Stove  room 
Kitchen,  Cellar  and  what  room  she  has  occasion  for  as  also  to  the  still 
Kettle,  but  if  her  having  room  in  the  said  House  and  Stove  Room  could 
not  be  Effected  in  Peace  and  Unity  then  a  house  with  a  warm  Room  shall 
be  Built  and  added  to  my  House,  and  firewood  ready  for  use  be  delivered 
to  her  Door.  Further  shall  she  have  necessarys  of  Life  of  my  Land 
Yearly  twenty  Bushels  of  Grain  to  witt  one  half  part  to  be  Wheat  and 
the  other  part  Rye,  one  hundred  and  fifty  Pounds  of  Pork  and  fifty 
Pounds  of  Beef,  one  third  part  of  the  Kitchen  Garden,  and  one  third 
part  of  the  orchard  Fruit  and  thirty  Pounds  of  fflax  the  said  above 
mentioned  Parts  and  things  my  said  Son  Samuel  Landus  shall  give  unto 
his  Mother  out  of  my  said  Lands,  besides  her  share  of  the  said  one 
hundred  and  fifty  Pounds  and  he  shall  also  keep  for  her  in  free  fodder 


1  Survey  Book  D,  No.  83,  p.  202.     Harrisburg,   Philadelphia. 

2  Will  Book  I,  p.  397.     Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


334  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

and  stabling,  two  Cows,  a  Horse,  or  Mare  and  three  sheep  as  well 
Provided  for  as  his  own.  And  concerning  my  young  children  they  shall 
have  House  room  along  with  their  Mother,  till  they  can  earn  their  own 
Bread  The  above  necessaries  of  Life  my  s^  Wife  may  Enjoy  with  my 
said  Son  at  one  Table,  as  long  as  both  Parties  like  it,  but  if  it  wont 
suit  no  Longer,  then  she  shall  receive  the  above  in  Fact  to  Enjoy  the 
same  at  her  Own  Table  during  Her  Widowhood.  Further  it  is  my  will 
that  my  said  Son  Samuel  shall  gradually  pay  for  the  said  Land  Namely 
Fifteen  Pounds  within  one  Year  next  after  my  decease  and  the  like  Sum 
every  Year  untill  the  whole  is  paid  off  all  at  certain  appointed  Times, 
without  Interest  and  therefore  I  do  hereby  give  full  power  unto  my 
Executors  to  make  a  title  unto  my  said  son  Samuel  for  my  said  Land 
as  good  as  I  could  do  myself.  Further  touching  my  moveables,  I  leave 
the  management  thereof  unto  my  Executors  and  my  Heirs  to  dispose 
of  them  to  the  best  advantage  Either  by  Vendue  or  Sell  them  otherways, 
only  that  honesty  be  observed.  And  out  of  the  above  all  my  Just  debts 
shall  be  paid  and  Satisfied.  And  all  the  residue  of  my  Estate  (including 
what  they  have  of  me  received  already)  shall  be  Equally  divided  amongst 
my  children  share  and  share  alike  and  such  Division  shall  be  made  when 
my  Youngest  Son  shall  be  Nineteen  Years  old  which  shall  be  in  Jan- 
uary in  year  1759.  Furthermore  I  do  Nominate  my  Brother  in  law 
Jacob  Musselman  and  my  son  Jacob  Landus  to  be  my  Executors  hoping 
they  will  take  care  of  my  Widow  and  Children  as  good  as  they  can  so 
that  each  of  them  may  get  his  share.  Moreover  I  do  desire  that  this 
my  Last  Will  and  Testament  may  by  my  Wife  and  Children  be  received 
as  such  and  live  peacebly  according  to  the  same  WITNESS  my  own 
hand  in  the  presence  of 

Johannes  Funck 

George  Ackerman 


I  do  hereby  certify  that  the  foregoing  Instrument  purport  the  Last 
Will  and  Testament  o.f  John  Landus  deceased  to  be  a  true  and  genuine 
translation  of  the  tenor  and  Contents  of  the  original  in  the  German 
Tongue  Witness  my  hand  Feb^  13,  1749/50. 

Christ'^  Lehman 

Transl""  ibim 

BE  IT  REMEMBERED  that  on  the  P'  May  1750  the  Last  Will 
and  Testament  of  John  Landus   deceased  was  Proved  in  due  form  of 


THE  LANDIS  FAMILY  335 

Law  and  Probated  and  Letters  Testamentary  were  granted  to  the  said 
Exec"  therein  named  being  first  solemnly  affirmed  well  and  truly  to 
administer  the  said  Dec'd  estate  and  to  bring  an  Inventory  thereof  into 
the  Reg""  Gen'  Office  at  Philadelphia  at  or  before  the  P*  of  June  next 
and  render  a  true  account  when  thereunto  Lawfully  required.  Given 
under  the  seal  of  the  said  office.^ 

\Ym  Plumstead    Reg"^  Gen', 


Inventory  of  the  Late  John  Landus  Decd  Exhibited  22  Day 

August,  1751 

Of  All  the  Personal  Estate  of  John  Landus  of  the  Great  Swamp 
in  Lower  Millford  Township  in  the  County  of  Bucks,  Dec'd,  to  wit  of 
the  Cash  Bonds  Notes  Book  Debts  Horses,  Mares  Cattle  Sheep  Hogs  & 
Household  good  Taken  by  the  Subscribers  the  twelf  day  of  April  Anno 
Dom.  1748. 

Imprimis  £• 

To  Cash  0 

To  a  Note  from  Michael  Goodman 8 

To  a  Note  from  John  George  Herg 3 

To  a  Note  from  Samuel  Bechtell 1 

To  all  the  Book  debts 9 

To  a  Hatchell  0 

To  an  Iron  Pott 0 

To  a  fifrying  Pan   0 

To  a  Water  Spout 0 

To  a  Copper  Pan 0 

To  a  Tin  Quart  half  pint  &  Funnell 0 

To  two  Iron  Pans 0 

To  a   Pewter   Tankard 0 

To  a  Copper  Sauce  Pan  a  Saimer,  fflesh  fifork  &  Iron 

Ladle 0 

To  a  Pint 0 

To  a  p""  of  Tongues  &  a  pruning  knife 0 

To  an  Iron  Pan  0 

To  an  Augur  &  Chissell 0 


s. 

D, 

15 

0 

14 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

18 

1 

5 

0 

3 

0 

5 

0 

7 

6 

3 

0 

2 

10 

5 

0 

4 

6 

4 

0 

0 

6 

4 

6 

3 

0 

5 

0 

1  Original  Papers,  No.  255.     Register  of  Wills,  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


336  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

To  ffive  Plates  &  a  strainer 0  1  0 

To  an  Iron  Pott 0  6  0 

To  a  hand  Saw  &  Drawing  Knife 0  6  0 

To  two  Pewter  Basins,  three  Plates  &  Eleven  Spoons.  .  0  18  0 

To  a  Gun 1  5  0 

To  three  Delft  Plates 0  1  6 

To  Coopers  Ware    0  4  0 


29  1  5 

Brought  over  from  the  other  side £29  1  5 

To  Seven  Loaf  Baskets 0  1  6 

To  Six  Glass  Bottles  and  a  Stone  Jug 0  4  0 

To  a  Sheep  Shears 0  1  3 

To  a  pair  of  Wool  Card 0  2  0 

To  a  Bell  0  1  0 

To  a  B— 0  1  0 

To  a  Spice  Box  Some  Spice  &  Salt  Box 0  2  6 

To  a  Saddle    0  15  0 

To  Some  Trailers  &  Traces 1  0  0 

To  pair  Bellys 0  1  0 

To  Sundry  Cyder  Casks  big  and  small 1  5  0 

To  five  Laythes    0  1  6 

To  three  Seckels 0  2  6 

To  an  Ax 0  2  6 

To  a  Hammer  &  an  Iron  Plane 0  5  0 

To  Two  Axes 0  4  0 

To  a  Dresser  and  a  Meal  Chest 1  4  0 

To  a  Grubbing  how 0  5  0 

To  two  Baskets    0  1  0 

To  an  Iron  Stove 5  0  0 

To  a  new  chest  in  the  Room 0  7  0 

To  an  old  chest 0  5  0 

To  two  new  chests 1  5  0 

To  two  Spinning  Wheels 0  9  0 

To  three  Bedsteads 0  15  0 

To  a  Bed  in  the  Corner  of  the  Room 1  10  0 

To  Another  Bed  in  the  Room 1  10  0 

To  Another  Bed 1  10  0 


■^ 


h.j/'/.i 


^/.^^//^-^^^   ^'• 


0 


1,/i^^^J^ 


lot 


OK 


Official    \'isas   Covering   Continental    Tour.    1920-21. 


THE  LANDIS  FAMILY  337 

To  a  Large  Spinning  Wheel 0  3  0 

To  a  Bible  1  0  0 

To  a  Hymn  Book  a  Catechism  &  two  Psalm  Books 0  6  0 

Carried  over    £48  1  2 

Brought  over  from  other  side 48  1  2 

To  a  Bible .  0  4  0 

To  a  Maul  &  Wedges  0  2  6 

To  a  Waggon   4  10  0 

To  a  Plow  &  Harrow 1  10  0 

To  a  Wind  Mill  to  clean  Corn  &  a  Grind  Stone 3  7  0 

To  a  Young  Brown  Mare   4  0  0 

To  a  Young  Black  Horse 8  14  0 

To  a  Pacing  Mare 11  10  0 

To  a  Roan  Horse 5  0  0 

To  a  Sow    1  5  0 

To       Eleven  Sheep   3  6  0 

To  a  Dung  Fork  &  Hook  &  Pitch  Fork 0  1  0 

To       Five  Cows 10  15  0 

To  Two  Heiffers   3  10  0 

To  a   Bull    1  5  0 

To  Two  Red  Heiffers  &  a  Black  One 3  0  0 

To  Five  Calves  2  10  0 

To  Black  Heiffer 0  15  0 

To  Another    Heiffer    0  15  0 

To  Another  Heiffer  0  15  0 

To  Two  Cows    2  0  0 

To  One  Cow 1  5  0 

To  ffive  Hogs 1  0  0 

Totall    £119  0  8 

Land  appraised  150  —  — 


Witness  our  Hand  £269      0      8 

Hans  Yoder 

his 
Hans   HD    Driessell 

mark 
Abraham  Shaly 


338 


THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 


I  do  hereby  Certifie  the  foregoing  to  be  a  True  and  genuine  Trans- 
lation &  Copy  of  the  Original  Inventory  in  the  German  Language 
hereunto  annexed. 
Witness  my  hand  Christ^  Lehman 

Transl''  ibim. 


Account  of  Estate  John  Landus,  Deceased,  1758 

The  Accompt  of  Jacob  Landus  Surviving  Execu^*"  of  the  Last  Will 
and  Testament  of  John  Landus  Deced  as  well  as  all  and  Singular,  the 
Goods  Chattels  Rights  and  Credits  which  were  of  the  s*^  Deced*  which 
Came  to  the  Hands  of  this  Accomp*  as  of  his  several  payments  and 
Disbursements  made  out  of  the  same  as  follows,  viz*. 


Imprimis 
1751  The  said  accomptant  Charges  himself  with  all 
Aug.  22  and  Singular  the  Goods  Chattels  rights  and 
Credits  which  were  of  s^  Deced*  as  mentioned  in 
an  Inventory  thereof  Exhibited  into  &  remain- 
ing in  the  Reg''  Gen'^  Office  at  Philad=^  An°  Do 
The  said  Accomp*  further  Charges  himself  with 
the  following  Sums  lent  or  paid  to  his  Children 
in  his  lifetime  &  to  be  accounted  for  as  by  his 
Will  to  wit 

Jacob  Landus  reced £32       8       3 

John  Landus  reced 13       3       6 

Barbara  Landus  reced 20     12      9 


Dr. 


269      0      8 


£  66 


£335 


ITEM 


May  1 


The  said  accomptant  prays  allowance  for  his 
Sev'l  payments  &  Disbursements  Made  out  of  the 
same  as  follows  viz* 

By  Cash  pd  for  Probate  of  y^  Will  &  Inv*y 

P'^  Jacob  Grove  &  Abraham  Veichtell  p""  rec't .... 
P'^  for  Translating  the  will  &  Inv*^ 


1 

1 

— 

5 

3 

6 

1 

10 

0 

^ 


c 


'^u. 


ttn  pt  ju^kS  *  max  '  %.       ^j. 

Vitole  POUT  un  t«|oi(r  -|mp||-'  -   ^  j/ 


h-  VISAS.    ^ 


,'^^-"f- •/•/ —     / 


:i±WS 


1920 


1^?f?|!«- 


A«ESfCA«  Vice  Cc/.-v 


.'-•^.J^i&fe' 


-^^ 


Official    Visas   Covering   Continental    Tour.    1S»20-21. 


THE  LANDIS  FAMILY  339 

P^  for  making  up  y^  fair  copy  &  clerk  [etc] 1       5     — 

P'^  Jn°  Kooken  for  writing  and  other  services.  .  .  Ill       9 

By  Commiss's    £269    0    8   at 

2y2  pr  ct.  6     14      6 


£  17 


By  Ball  remaining   £317  19     5 

to  be  divided  as  follows  agreeable 

to  the  Will 

To  the  Widow  1/3  part 105  19  10 

To  9  children  each 

£23     11     0^    and    1/9    of    a 

farthing    211   19     7 


£317     17 


£335      5      2 

As  shown  by  the  above  papers,  John  Landis  died  between 
September  26,  1747,  the  date  of  his  will,'  and  April  12,  1748,  when 
an  inventory  of  his  personal  estate  was  made.  The  will  being 
written  in  German,  a  translation  was  necessary  before  it  could  be 
probated.  The  final  account  was  rendered  in  1758.  Although  he 
was  a  resident  of  Bucks  County,  for  some  reason  the  will  was 
proved  in  Philadelphia  and  the  original  will  and  papers  are  filed 
in  the  Office  of  the  Register  of  Wills  in  that  city.  There  is  no 
record  of  his  will  and  estate  on  file  in  Doylestown,  Pa.  In  this  in- 
strument, he  mentions  only  his  wife  and  sons,  Samuel  and  Jacob, 
by  name,  to  whom  he  makes  certain  bequests  and  directs  that  his 
executors  divide  the  residue  of  his  estate  equally  among  all  of  his 
children  when  the  youngest  son  shall  have  reached  the  age  of  nine- 
teen years  which  would  be  in  1759.  The  account  of  the  executors 
rendered  in  1758,  shows  that  there  were  nine  children  then  living, 
but  we  know  of  only  seven. 


1  Will  Book  I,  p.  397.     Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


340  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Children  of  John  and  Ann  Landis:^ 

1.  John  Landis,  born  November  11,   1720,  in  Bucks  County.     He 

removed  to  Montgomery  County,  Pa. 

2.  Jacob    Landis,    died    in    1806,    near    Jersey    Shore,    Lycoming 

County,  Pa. 

3.  Martin  Landis. 

4.  George  Landis. 

5.  Samuel  Landis,  died  1771 ;  married  Margaret  .     Resided 

in  Lower  Milford  Township,  Bucks  County,  Pa.  His 
will  names  children :  John,  Jacob,  Abraham,  George,  Anne, 
Barbara,  and  Eve.  The  witnesses  were  Michael  Musselman 
and  Jacob  Shelle.^ 

6.  VERONICA  LANDIS,  married  MICHAEL  BAUER. 

7.  Barbara  Landis. 


DESCENT  FROM  JOHN  LANDIS: 

VIII.  John  Landis  married  Ann  . 

VII.  Veronica  Landis  married  Michael  Bauer. 

VI.  Fronica  Landis  Bauer  married  Abraham  Schwenk. 

V.  Jacob  Schwenk  married  Magdalena  Ziegler. 

IV.  Elizabeth  Ziegler  Schwenk  married  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger. 

III.  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Mary  Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


1  D.   B.  Landis,  History  of  the  Landis  Fcviiilv  of  Lancaster  County,  Pennsyl- 
vania, 1888,  p.  15. 

-  Will   Book  P,   p.  59.     Philadelphia,   Pennsylvania. 


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The  MARKLEY  FAMILY 

J  ORG  (GEORGE)  MERKLIN,  the  earliest  known  ancestor 
of  the  Markley  family  of  Pennsylvania,  was  a  native  of  the 
District  of  Wimpfen,  in  the  Grand  Duchy  of  Hesse,   Ger- 
many.   He  was  born  about  1620-1622 ;  his  wife's  name  was  Eva. 

In  the  church  book  of  Bonfeld,  District  of  Heilbronn,  King- 
dom of  Wiirtemburg,  and  of  Wimpfen  in  Grand  Duchy  of  Hesse, 
is  found  the  following  concerning  Jorg  and  Eva  Merklin  and 
their  children: 

Children  of  Jorg  and  Eva  Merklin: 

1.  Dietrich  Merkle,  born  in  Wimpfen,  1646;  died  January  25,  1694; 

married  August  18,  1674,  Appolonia  Bucher. 

2.  Jorg  Merkle,  born  August  26,  1652. 

3.  George  Matthaus  Merkle,  born  May  7,  1655;  died  May  6,  1726; 

married  May  22,  1679,  Agnes  Hess,  who  died  May  27,  1735. 

4.  Anna  Magdalena  Merkle,  born  March  16,  1656. 

5.  Wolfgang  Georg  Merkle,  born  April  17,  1658;  married  January, 

1681,  Anna  Elizabeth . 

6.  Jorg  Heinrich  Merkle,  born  January  21,  1662;  married  Marie 

Katherine . 

7.  ABRAHAM  MERKLE,  born  in  Wimpfen,  March  1,  1664;  mar- 

ried July  27,  1684,  ANNA  VERONICA . 

ABRAHAM  MERKLE,  youngest  son  of  George  and  Eva 
Merklin,  was  born  March  1,  1664,  in  Wimpfen,  Germany;  mar- 
ried July  27,  1684,  Anna  Veronica,  whose  surname  is  unknown. 

According  to  the  Church  Book  of  Bonfeld,  Abraham  and  Anna 
Veronica  Merkle  were  the  parents  of  thirteen  children.' 


1  Stammtafel  Der  Familie  Merkle  (Merklin).  From  the  Church  Books  of 
Bonfeld,  District  of  Heilbronn,  Kingdom  of  Wiirtemberg  and  those  of  Wimpfen 
in  Grand  Duchy  of   Hesse. 


342  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

Children  of  Abraham  and  Anna  Veronica  Merkle: 

1.  Jeremias  Andreas  Alerkle,  born  May  16,  1685;  died  young. 

2.  Anna  Maria  Merkle,  born  January  16,  1687. 

3.  Anna  Felicitas  Alerkle,  born  January  6,  1689. 

4.  Anna  Veronica  Merkle,  born  August  22,  1690;  died  1691. 

5.  Andreas  Jeremias  Merkle,  born  June  9,   1692 ;  died  April   19, 

1766;  married  October  6,  1716,  in  Wimpfen,  Maria  Kath- 
erine  Lautenschlager. 

6.  Anna  Katherine  Merkle,  born  March  19,  1695. 

7.  Anna  Veronica  Merkle,  born  January  3,  1697 ;  died  1708. 

8.  Regina  Christine  Merkle,  born  March  20,  1699. 

9.  Isaac  Merkle,  born  July  11,  1701;  died  in  infancy. 

10.  JACOB  MERKLE,  born  July  11,  1701;  married,   1st,  BAR- 

BARA DODDERER,  2nd,  Barbara  Rausch. 

11.  Isaac  Merkle,  born  February  22,  1704;  died  young. 

12.  Anna  Rosina  Merkle,  born  November  5,  1705. 

13.  Abraham  Merkle,  born   Alarch   12,   1708;  died   September   11, 

1708. 


JACOB  MERKLE  (MARKLEY),  son  of  Abraham  and 
Anna  Veronica  Merkle,  was  born  at  Wimpfen  in  Hesse-Darm- 
stadt, July  11,  1701.  He  was  a  twin  to  Isaac,  who  died  in 
infancy.  The  Markley  chart  has  an  error  in  regard  to  these  twins. 
While  stating  that  Jacob  and  Isaac  were  twins  (Zwillinge)  born 
"11  Juli,  1701,"  underneath  the  name  of  Isaac  is  "gestorben  (died) 
15  October,  1699."  Another  son  named  Isaac  was  bom  1704, 
who  also  died  young. ^ 

Jacob  Merkle  came  to  Pennsylvania  when  a  young  man, 
settling  in  the  Skippack  region,  where  he  married  February  13, 
1722,  Barbara,  daughter  of  George  Philip  and  Veronica  Dotterer, 
of  Frederick  Township,  Montgomery,  but  then  in  Philadelphia, 
County. 


1  Stammtafel  Der  Familie  Merkle. 


THE  MARKLEY  FAMILY  343 

Jacob  Merkle  was  one  of  the  early  settlers  of  what  was  then 
known  as  Bebbers  Township.  Here  in  1725  we  find  him  signing 
his  name  "Jacob  Marckley"  to  the  petition  to  the  Court  of  Quarter 
Sessions  of  Philadelphia  County,  requesting  that  a  township  be 
regularly  laid  out  covering  this  district  and  be  given  the  name  of 
''Skippack  and  Perkiomen."^ 

In  May,  1728,  his  name  appears  among  those  residents  of 
"Van  Bebbers  Township  and  ye  adjacencies  Belonging"  who  sent 
a  petition  to  the  Governor  of  the  Commonwealth,  asking  for  pro- 
tection against  the  Indians  who  were  attacking  settlers  at  "falk- 
ners  Swamp  &  New  Cosahopin."  More  than  half  of  these  names 
were  written  by  John  Roberts,  an  Englishman  who  lived  near 
Pennepacker's  Mills  and  we,  therefore,  find  him  as  "Jacob 
Marieke.""  Apparently  he  was  not  greatly  concerned  about  the 
threatened  Indian  outrages,  for  two  months  later,  July  17,  1728, 
he  purchased  of  Jost  Heydt,  one  hundred  acres,  and  November  28, 
following,  bought  one  hundred  and  thirty-two  acres  of  Nicholas 
Scull.  These  tracts  were  located  within  the  limits  of  the  present 
East  Perkiomen  Township.^ 

In  1734,  he  is  reported  as  a  taxable  of  Perkiomen  and  Skip- 
pack  township,  owning  two  hundred  acres;  on  January  13, 
1732-3,  he  paid  quitrent  on  three  hundred  and  eighty-two  acres 
of  land  in  Bebbers  Township,  to  the  amount  of  £1  12.  4.  In  the 
census  taken  June  5,  1756,  of  "Parkiomen  &  Shippaake"  township, 
appears  the  name  Jacob  Marcly,  housekeeper;  occupation,  farmer, 
four  children  under  21;  acres  owned  150 — 50  acres  cleared,  15 
acres  sowed  with  corn,  1  horse,  three  horned  cattle.  In  1769,  he 
paid  a  proprietary  tax  on  one  hundred  and  fifty  acres,  one  horse, 
three  horned  cattle;  in  1776,  the  same  amount  of  land,  one  horse 
and  three  horned  cattle  are  still  credited  to  him.  Since  he  appears 
to  have  owned  but  one  horse,  when  this  was  stolen  from  him  it  is 
not  surprising  that  we  find  him  advertising  its  loss  in  the  two  lead- 


1  Samuel  W.  Pennypacker,  Bcbbcr's  Tozvnship  and  the  Dutch  Patroons, 
pp.  10,  11. 

2  Samuel  W.  Pennypacker,  Bebher's  Township  and  the  Dutch  Patroons, 
pp.  12,  13.  Like  the  majority  of  the  early  German  names,  we  find  many  spellings 
of  this  name  on  the  old  documents.     Americanized,  it  became  Markley. 

2  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  The  Perkiomen  Region,  Volume  I,  p.  102. 


344  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

ing  papers  of  the  community.    In  the  Pennsylvania  Gazette  of  July 
31,  1776,  appears  the  following  notice:^ 

FIVE  POUNDS  REWARD. 

Stolen  from  the  subscriber,  living  in  Perkiomen  town- 
ship, Philadelphia  county,  the  12th  of  July  inst.  at  night  a 
Strawberry-roan  HORSE  9  years  old,  about  16  hands  high 
with  a  white  star  in  his  forehead  paces  and  trots,  carries 
lofty,  was  shod  on  one  of  his  fore  feet.  Whoever  takes  up 
the  said  horse  and  thief  and  secures  them,  so  that  the  thief 
may  be  brought  to  justice,  and  the  owner  may  have  the  horse 
again,  shall  have  the  above  reward  for  both,  or  Three 
Pounds  for  the  horse  only,  and  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

Jacob  Merkley. 

Jacob  Markley  subscribed  to  the  qualifications  and  was  nat- 
uralized September  24,  1753,  thus  becoming  a  full  citizen  of  Penn- 
sylvania. As  he  had  conscientious  scruples  against  taking  an 
oath,  he  is  named  as  a  Quaker  and  therefore  merely  affirmed  the 
terms  of  naturalization."  Both  he  and  his  family  were  members 
of  Augustus  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  at  New  Providence 
(Trappe),  where  we  find  the  following  entries  on  the  church  book:^ 

"Anna  Barbara  Merckle,  daughter  of  Jacob,  born  October  6,  1746; 
baptized  March  29,  1747;  godparents,  Abraham  Merckle  and  wife. 

"April  7,  1751,  in  Providence  was  confirmed:  Veronica  Merckelin, 
Jacob  Alerckels  daughter,  19  years  old.     She  can  read  a  little. 

"June  1,  1760,  was  confirmed  Nella,  Jacob  Merckels  daughter,  17 
years  old. 

"In  the  year  1770  was  confirmed:  Hanna  Mercklin,  Jacobs  daugh- 
ter, 18. 

"1751,  April  30,  Georg  Schwenck  and  Veronica  Merckelin,  Jacob 
Merckels  daughter  were  married. 

"1757,  July  13,  Christian  Brennemen  and  Catherina  Merckelin,  Jacob 
Merckle's  daughter,  were  married. 


1  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  The  Dottcrcr  Family,  pp.  45,  46. 

2  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Volume  II,  p.  390. 

3  Records     Augustus'     Evangelical     Lutheran     Church,     Trappe,     ^Montgomery 
County,  Pennsylvania. 


Official    Visas    Covering    Continental    Tour,    1920-21, 


THE  MARKLEY  FAMILY  345 

"Jacob  Merckel  and  wife  Barbara  were  sponsors  for  Jacob,  son  of 
Jurg  Schwenck  and  wife  Euphronica,  born  7th  June,  baptized  3rd  August, 
1755." 

Among  the  members  of  the  Congregation  who  promised  to 
contribute  yearly  to  the  "Salery  of  the  Reverd  Parstor  Muhlen- 
berg" November  27,  1760,  were:^ 

Jacob  Merckle,  15s. 

Abraham  Merckle,  10s. 

Philip  Merckle,  10s. 
George  Schwenck,         7s.  6d. 

At  the  outbreak  of  hostilities  with  England,  the  Continental 
Congress,  on  July  18,  1775,  then  convening  in  Philadelphia,  passed 
the  following  resolution:" 

"In  Congress,  18th  July,  1775. 

"Resolved,  That  it  be  recommended  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  United 
English  Colonies  in  North  America,  that  all  able-Bodied  effective  Men, 
between  16  &  50  years  of  age,  in  each  Colony,  immediately  form  them- 
selves into  regular  Companies  of  Militia,  to  consist  of  one  Captain,  two 
Lieutenants,  One  Ensign,  four  Serjeants,  four  Corporals,  One  Clerk,  one 
Drummer,  one  Fifer,  and  about  Sixty-eight  Privates. 

"That  the  Officers  of  each  Company  be  chosen  by  the  respective 
Companies. 

"That  the  Companies  be  formed  into  Regiments  or  Battalions, 
Officer'd  with  a  Colonel,  Lieutenant  Colonel,  two  Majors,  an  Adjutant 
or  Quarter  Master. 

"That  all  Officers  above  the  Rank  of  a  Captain  be  appointed  by  their 
respective  Provincial  Assemblies  or  Conventions,  or  in  their  recess  by  the 
Committees  of  Safety  appointed  by  said  Assemblies  or  Conventions. 

"That  all  Officers  be  Commission'd  by  the  Provincial  Assemblies  or 

Conventions,  or  in  their  recess  by  the  Committees  of  Safety  appointed  by 

said  Assemblies  or  Conventions. 
*** 

"As  there  are  some  people  who,  from  religious  principles,  cannot  bear 
arms  in  any  case,  this  Congress  intend  no  violence  to  their  consciences, 
but  earnestly  recommend  it  to  them  to  contribute  liberally  to  the  relief 


1  Records     Augustus     Evangelical     Lutheran     Church,     Trappe,     Montgomery 
County,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Journals  of   the  Continental  Congress,   Volume   II,  p.   187. 


346  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

of  their  distressed  brethren,  in  their  several  colonies,  and  to  do  all  other 
services  to  their  oppressed  Country  which  they  can  consistently  with  their 
religious  principles. 

"That  it  be  recommended  to  each  Colony  to  appoint  a  Committee  of 
Safety,  to  superintend  and  direct  all  matters  necessary  for  the  Security 
and  defense  of  their  respective  Colonies  in  the  recess  of  their  Assemblies 
and  Conventions. 

***  Charles  Thomson,  Sec'ty." 

In  pursuance  of  this  order,  the  citizens  of  Philadelphia  County 
met  and  formed  themselves  into  companies  of  associators  and 
elected  their  field  officers.  The  return  of  the  First  Battalion,  which 
included  Perkiomen  and  Skippack  townships,  shows  that  Daniel 
Heister,  Jr.,  Esquire,  was  chosen  Colonel;  Jacob  Reed,  Esquire, 
Lieutenant  Colonel,  and  Jacob  Markley,  Esquire,  Major.  Jacob 
Markley  was  now  in  his  76th  year,  and  the  fact  that  he  was  chosen 
despite  his  years  to  hold  this  important  military  office  certainly  is 
an  indication  that  he  was  in  most  hearty  sympathy  with  the  Ameri- 
can cause.  It  is  not  known  if  he  accepted  this  office,  or  if  at  any  time 
he  performed  actual  service  in  the  field.  Colonel  Heister's  Regi- 
ment was  ordered  to  Swede's  Ford,  on  duty,  but  the  Revolutionary 
rolls,  as  they  appear  in  the  Pennsylvania  Archives,  do  not  again 
name  Major  Jacob  Markley,  though  he  was  known  as  Major  Mark- 
ley  the  rest  of  his  life. 

PHILADELPHIA  COUNTY  ASSOCIATORS — 1777.       (a.) 

To   His   Excellency   Thomas   Wharton,  Jr.,   Esquire,   President   of   the 
Supreme  Executive  Council  of  the  Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania. 

Agreeable  to  the  directions  of  the  Militia  Law  of  this  Commonwealth, 
the  Lieutenants  and  Sub-Lieutenants  for  the  County  of  Philadelphia  hav- 
ing Attended  the  Elections  of  the  several  Districts  for  Field  Officers, 
do  return  the  following  Gentlemen  as  duly  Elected  for  the  said  districts : 

First  Battalion. 

Upper  Salford,  Lower  Salford,  Franconia,  Towamensing,  Hatfields, 
&  Perkiomen  &  Skippach.^ 


1  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Sixth  Series,  Volume  I,  p.  605. 


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THE  MARKLEY  FAMILY  347 

Colonel. 
Daniel  Heister,  Jr.,  Esq. 

Lieutenant  Colonel. 
Jacob  Reed,  Esq. 

Major. 
Jacob  Markley,  Esq. 

It  is  interesting  to  note  that  the  Augustus  Lutheran  Church, 
Trappe,  of  which  Major  Markley  and  his  family  were  members, 
was  under  the  charge  of  the  venerable  and  beloved  pastor,  Henry 
Melchior  Muhlenberg,  founder  of  the  Lutheran  Church  in  Amer- 
ica.   His  eldest  son,  John  Peter  Gabriel  Muhlenberg,  born  in  the 
village  of  Trappe,  October  1,  1746,  was  educated  in  Halle,  Ger- 
many; he  was  ordained,  1768,  and  became  rector  of  Zion's  and  St. 
Paul's  Church  in  New  Jersey.    He  was  stationed  in  Virginia,  serv- 
ing as  pastor  to  the  Lutheran  congregations  in  that  colony,  when 
the  Revolutionary  War  broke  out.    He  had  been  an  active  supporter 
of  the  American  cause  from  the  beginning,  having  been  appointed 
a  member  of  the  Committee  of  Safety  of  Drumore  County,  Va., 
and  at  once  became  its  ruling  spirit.    It  was  there,  at  Woodstock, 
that  he  preached  his  powerful  sermon  on  the  sacred  character  of  the 
struggle  in  which  the  colonies  were  engaged.    At  the  conclusion  of 
the  sermon  he  said:     "That  it  was  the  language  of  the  Holy  Writ 
there  was  a  time  for  all  things,  a  time  to  preach  and  a  time  to  pray, 
but  those  times  had  passed  and  there  was  a  time  to  fight,  and  that 
time  had  now  come."  Pronouncing  the  benediction,  he  deliberately 
put  off  his  gown  and  stood  before  his  people  clad  in  the  uniform  of  a 
Continental  officer.     Descending  from  the  pulpit  he  ordered  the 
drums  beat  and  then  and  there  nearly  three  hundred  of  his  church- 
men enlisted  under  his  banner.    He  rose  to  the  rank  of  Brigadier 
General  of  the  Army,  held  many  positions  of  trust  and  influence 
both  in  Virginia  and  Pennsylvania,  being  elected  to  the  Vice-Presi- 
dency of  his  home  State,  Pennsylvania,  1785;  served  in  the  First, 
Second  and  Third  Continental  Congresses,  member  State  Assem- 
bly and  United  States  Senator  from  Pennsylvania,  1800,  and  Major 
General  Pennsylvania  Militia  from  1800  until  his  death,  October 


348  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

1,  1807.  He  is  buried  at  Augustus  Lutheran  Church,  at  Trappe, 
Pennsylvania/ 

Barbara  Dotterer,  wife  of  Jacob  Markley,  died  July  24,  1738. 
On  July  29,  1739,  he  married  (second)  Barbara  Rausch,  who  was 
born  April  14,  1714.  The  third  daughter  of  this  marriage,  born 
November  9,  1744,  was  christened  May  28,  1745,  by  the  pastor  of 
the  Falkner  Swamp  Lutheran  Church. 

The  old  Lutheran  Family  Bible  of  the  Markleys  was  printed 
in  Nuremberg,  1725.  It  contains  a  lengthy  family  record  written 
by  Jacob  Markley,  the  original  owner,  Philip  Markley,  his  son, 
and  George  Boyer,  a  later  descendant.  Following  is  a  copy  of  the 
earliest  record:" 

Jacob  Markley  (to  whom  this  Bible  originally  belonged)  was  joined 
in  Holy  Matrimony  to  Barbara  Dodderer  on  the  13th  day  of  February, 
Anno  Domini  1722,  and  they  begat  the  following  children,  to  wit: 

1st     A  son  born 

2nd  A  son  born  on  the  last  Sunday  the  27th  day,  in  the  month  of 
August,  A.D.  1725,  baptized  and  named  Philip.  His 
godfather  and  godmother  were  his  grandparents,  George 
Philip  Dodderer  and  Fronica  his  wife. 

3rd     A  daughter  born  New  Years  day,  1727,  but  died  soon  after. 

4th     Isaac  Alarkley,  Born  1729. 

5th     Veronica  Markley,  Born  April  1,  1732. 

6th     Rebecca  Markley. 

7th    A  daughter  born  April  9,  A.D.  baptized  and  named  

her  sponsors  in  baptism  were  her  parents. 

8th  A  daughter,  born  April  1st,  A.D.  1732,  baptized  May  4th  and 
named  Fronica,  her  sponsors  were  (German  and  unde- 
cipherable). 

9th  A  daughter,  born  May  27th,  A.D.  1736,  baptized  July  18,  and 
named  Christina. 

10th  A  daughter  born  May  9th,  1738,  and  named  Catherine.  July 
24,  1738,  the  above  named  Barbara  (late  Barbara  Dod- 
derer) wife  of  Jacob  Markley,  died. 


1  Records  Augustus  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church,  Trappe,  Montgomery  Co.,  Pa. 

2  Dotterer  Manuscripts,  Notes,  Volume  XII,  p.  3. 


THE  MARKLEY  FAMILY  349 

2nd  wife,  July  29,  1739,  the  said  Jacob  Markley  again  married 
to    Barbara    Katisch     [Rausch]     (which    said    Barbara 
Kausch  was  born  April  14th  A.  D.  1714). 
11th     A  daughter  born  February  15th,  1741. 

August  29th,  1784,  the  above  named  Jacob  Marckley  died. 

From  the  above  record  we  find  that  Jacob  Markley  died  August 
29,  1784,  in  his  84th  year.  He  made  a  will  June  10,  1779,  which 
was  probated  January  24,  1785: 

Will  of  Jacob  Markly,  1785. 

BE  IT  remem.bered  That  I  Jacob  Markly  of  the  Township  of  Skip- 
pack  and  Perkioming  in  the   County  of   Philadelphia  in  Pennsylvania 
Yeoman,  being,  (by  divine  favor)  in  my  Usual  health,  and  of  sound  dispos- 
ing mind  and  memory  but  Calling  to  mind  the  mortality  of  my  Body,  and 
that  it  is  appointed  for  all  men  once  to  die  do  think  fit  this  tenth  day  of 
June  in  the  Year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  seventy 
nine  do  make  and  ordain  this  my  last  Will  &  Testament,  the  which  I  do 
in  the  following  manner  and  form  that  is  to  say,  In  the  first  place  it  is 
my  will  and  I  do  order  that  all  my  just  debts  and  funeral  Expences  be 
duly  paid  &  discharg<i.  Satisfied  out  of  my  estate  by  my  Executors,  here- 
after named  -  -  2d.    I  give  and  Bequeathe  to  my  beloved  wife  Barbara,  hef 
Bed  Bedstead  and  all  the  beding  thereunto  belonging,  such  part  of  the 
pewter  and  Earthen  ware  as  she  shall  Judge  necessary  for  her  one  Round 
walnut  table,  two  Chairs,  two  Iron  potts,  one  Teakettle  and  all  the  Tea 
tackling,  and  one  Cow,  all  which  to  be  to  the  use  of  her  my  said  wife, 
during  her  natural  life,  and  I  further  give  unto  my  said  wife  during  the 
term  of  her  natural  life  the  free  and  uninterupted  use  of  our  present 
lodging  room  and  the  Kitchen  &  I  further  give  to  my  said  wife  the  yearly 
Interest  of  one  hundred  &  fifty  pounds  during  her  natural  life  -  -  31y,  And 
as  my  soninlaw  Jacob  Brutzman  has  agreed  to  farm  my  Plantation  and 
Render  me  the  third  Bushel  it  is  my  will  and  I  do  order  that  he  shall  have 
it  at  the  same  rate  after  my  decease  during  the  natural  life  of  my  said 
wife  he  to  keep  her  Cow  and  find  her  firewood  ready  Cut,  at  the  door  My 
wife  to  have  as  much  of  the  said  third  part  of  grain  as  will  be  necessary 
for  her  use  and  the  Remainder  to  be  deliver^  to  my  Executors  for  the 
Benefit  of  my  Children  and  if  the  roof  of  the  said  Kitchen  or  lodging 
room  shall  need  repairing  During  the  life  of  my  said  wife  I  order  my 
Executors  to  get  it  done,  and  defray  the  Expence  thereof  out  of  my  estate 
-  -  4thly  It  is  my  will  and  I  do  order  that  as  soon  as  Conveniently  may  be 


350  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

after  the  decease  of  my  said  wife  my  Executors  or  the  Survivor  of  them 
shall  sell  by  public  sale  my  Plantation  whereon  I  now  live,  for  the  best 
price  that  can  be  had  for  the  same,  and  also  sell  such  of  my  Moveables  as 
shall  then  be  Remaining  and  I  do  hereby  authorize  and  impower  my  Exe- 
cutors or  the  survivor  of  them  to  make  sale,  deliver  &  perfect  Deed  or 
deeds,  Conveyance  or  Conveyances  Sufficient  in  the  law  for  conveying 
and  assuring  all  my  lands  and  Tenaments  with  all  the  Appurtenances  unto 
the  purchaser  or  purchasers  thereof  his  her  or  their  heirs  and  assigns 
forever,  as  fully  freely  &  absolutely  to  all  intent  and  purposes  as  I  myself 
might  or  Could  have  done  when  living  and  personally  present  -  -  Sthly  I 
give  unto  my  daughter  Elianor  wife  of  Tobias  Boganer  the  sum  of  five 
shillings  -  -  6thly  And  I  do  order  that  the  monies  arising  by  the  Sale 
afores*^  and  all  other  my  Estate  shall  be  divided  into  eleven  equal  Shares  or 
parts  which  I  give  &  bequeathe  as  follows  one  share  to  my  son  Abraham, 
one  share  to  my  son  Philip  one  share  to  my  son  Isaac  one  share  to  the 
five  Children  of  my  Daughter  Vronica,  one  share  to  my  Daughter  Chris- 
tianna  the  wife  of  William  antis,  one  share  to  my  Daughter  Elizabeth 
Benner  one  share  to  my  daughter  Barbarah  wife  of  John  Smith,  one  share 
to  my  daughter  Rebekah  wife  of  Frederick  Isaac,  one  share  to  my  daugh- 
ter Hannah  wife  of  Jacob  Brutzman,  one  share  to  my  daughter  Caterine, 
and  one  share  I  give  to  my  two  sons  Abraham  and  Isaac  in  trust  only, 
and  to  and  for  the  use  of  my  daughter  Elianor  Boganer  to  be  paid  and 
laid  out  to  or  for  her  in  such  sums  and  in  such  manner  as  my  said  sons 
or  the  survivor  of  them  shall  think  fit,  but  in  case  of  the  death  of  her 
Husband  then  her  share  so  left  in  trust  to  be  paid  to  her,  and  in  Case  of 
her  death  before  the  said  share  is  expended  by  my  Executors  then  what 

remains  thereof  to  be  equally  divided  to  &  amongst  all  her  Children 

7thly  and  it  is  my  will  that  if  any  of  my  other  Children  should  happen  to 
die  before  the  division  afores*^  the  share  or  part  of  every  such  Child  shall 

be  equally  divided  between  his  or  her  Children 8th  and  it  is  also 

my  will  that  if  after  the  payment  of  my  Debts  and  funeral  Expences  any 
of  my  personal  estate  shall  remain  unapropriated  that  the  same  shall  be 
divided  in  the  same  manner  as  herein  mentioned  and  that  as  soon  as 

Conveniently  may  be  after  my  decease 9th  and  it  is  my  will  that 

what  my  Children  have  Respectively  receiv.  according  To  the  account  by 
me  kept,  and  herein  inserted,  Shall  be  deemed  and  accounted  at  the  final 
settlement  and  division  of  my  estate  as  part  of  their  respective  Shares  in 
order  that  equal  Justice  may  be  done  to  all,  that  is  to  say  my  son  Abraham 
Received  forty  pounds,  my  son  Phillip  thirty  pounds,  my  son  Isaac  twenty 
pounds  eighteen  Shillings,  Vronica  fourteen  pounds  fifteen  shillings,  Chris- 
tianna  ten  pounds  twelve   shillings  Elizabeth  thirteen  pounds  eighteen 


THE  MARKLEY  FAMILY  351 

Shillings  &  six  pence  Barbarah  twenty  seven  pounds  eleven  shillings, 
Rebekah  seven  pounds  nine  Shillings,  Elianor  thirty  pounds  eleven  shill- 
ings and  six  pence  Hannah  sixteen  pounds  ten  shillings,  Caterine  ten 
pounds  two  shillings.  And  I  do  hereby  nominate  Constitute  and  appoint 
my  two  sons  Abraham  &  Isaac  Executors  of  this  my  last  will  and  Testa- 
ment, and  I  do  hereby  Utterly  disallow  Revoke  and  disanul  all  and  every 
other  former  wills,  Testaments,  Legacies,  and  Executors  by  me  in  any 
wise  before  this  time  named,  Willed  or  Bequeathed,  Ratifieing  and  Con- 
firming this  and  no  other  to  be  my  last  Will  &  Testament.  In  witness 
whereof  I  have  hereunto  Set  my  hand  and  seal  the  day  and  Year  first 
above  written.^ 

Jacob  Markly 
Signed,  sealed,  published,  pronounced  and 
declared  by  the  said  Jacob  Markly  the 
Testator  for  and  as  his  last  Will  and 
Testament  in  the  presence  of  us  the 
subscribers 

William  Penebacer 

Jacob  Markley    Cord  weiner 

The  foregoing  witnesses  haveing  been  duly  qualified  and  the  will 
proved  probate  was  granted  unto  Abraham  Markley  &  Isaac  Markley 
they  having  first  duly  afirmed  well  and  truly  to  perform  the  same  to 
exhibit  a  true  and  perfect  Inventory  and  render  a  true  &  just  account 
according  to  law,  Given  from  under  my  hand  and  seal  this  24**^  day  of 
January  Ao  D'  1785.     Fredk  A.  Muhlenberg,  Register. 

Although  a  diligent  search  has  been  made,  the  burial  place  of 
Jacob  Markley  and  his  two  wives  has  not  been  ascertained.  In  all 
probability  they  were  buried  in  the  graveyard  belonging  to  the 
Lutheran  Church  at  Trappe,  of  which  he  and  his  family  were  for 
many  years  prominently  associated,  but  if  so,  no  tombstones  are 
now  standing  to  mark  their  graves.  Or  he  may  have  been  interred 
in  the  Falkner  Swamp  Lutheran  churchyard  with  which  congre- 
gation he  was  later  identified.  Jacob  Markley  left  many  worthy 
descendants.  Numerous  of  them  served  in  the  Revolutionary  War 
and  other  conflicts  into  which  the  United  States  later  engaged, 
while  others  entered  professional  or  commercial  life,  many  of 
whom  attained  high  positions  in  their  own  particular  field  of 
endeavor. 


1  Will  Book  No.  1,  p.  19.    Norristown,  Pennsylvania. 


352  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY     ■ 

Children  of  Jacob  Marklcy  and  Barbara  Dottereri^ 

1.  Abraham  Markley,  born  August  12,  1723;  married  September, 

1745,  Barbara  Ickes. 

2.  Philip  IMarkley,  born  August  27,  1725 ;  married  December  16, 

1746,  Mary  Johnson. 

3.  A  daughter,  born  on  New  Year's  Day,  1727;  died  soon  after. 

4.  Isaac  Markley,  born  May  24,  1729;  married  Sarah . 

5.  VERONICA  MARKLEY,  born  April  1,  1732;  married  April 

30,  1751,  GEORGE  SCHWENK;  died  October  2,  1777. 

6.  Rebecca  Markley,  married  Frederick  Isaac   (Isett). 

7.  Christina  Markley,  born  May  27,  1736;  married  Col.  William 

Antes,  of  Frederick  Township. 

8.  Catherine  Markley,  born  May  9,  1738;  married  July  13,  1757, 

Christian  Brennemann. 

Children  of  Jacob  Markley  and  Barbara  Rausch: 

9.  Eleanor  Markley,  born   February   5,   1741 ;  confirmed  June   1, 

1760;  married  Tobias  Boganer. 

10.  Elizabeth  Markley,  married  Paulus  Benner. 

11.  Mary  Magdalena  Markley,  born  November  9,  1744.^ 

12.  Barbara   Markley,  born  October  6,   1746;  married   March  28, 

1772,  John  Smith.^ 

13.  Hannah  Markley,  married  January  11,  1774,  Jacob  Brotzman. 

DESCENT  FROM  JORG  MERKLIN. 
X.     Jorg  Merklin  married  Eva . 


IX.     Abraham  IMerkle  married  Veronica 


VIII.  Jacob  Markley  married  Barbara  Dotterer. 

VII.  Veronica  Markley  married  George  Schwenk. 

VI.  Abraham  Schwenk  married  Veronica  Bauer. 

V.  Jacob  Schwenk  married  Magdalena  Ziegler. 

IV.  Elizabeth  Schwenk  married  Reuben  Y.  Strassburger. 

III.  Jacob  Andrew  Strassburger  married  Mary  Beaver. 

II.  Ralph  Beaver  Strassburger  married  May  Bourne. 

I.  Johann  Andreas  Peter  Strassburger. 


1  "The  Markley  Freundschaft,  1884."  Descendants  of  Jacob  Markley,  of 
Skippack,  Montgomery  County,  Pennsylvania.  Published  by  the  Markley  Freund- 
schaft.    1884.     pp.  5,  8. 

2  Records   Falkner    Swamp    Lutheran   Church,   Montgomery    County,    Pa. 

3  Pennsylvania  Archives,  Second  Series,  Vol.  II,  p.  196. 


Old  Mill  on  Normandv  Farm.    Oric'inallv  built  in  1744.    Rebuilt  in  1835. 


The  DOTTERER  FAMILY 


GEORGE  PHILIP  DODDERER  was  born  in  Europe  and 
came  to  Pennsylvania  with  his  wife  Veronica  and  seven 
children,  very  early  in  the  eighteenth  century.  Neither  his 
birthplace  nor  the  date  of  his  arrival  in  this  country  has  been 
ascertained. 

Several  years  before  his  death,  Mr.  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  from 
whose  collection  much  of  the  following  history  has  been  adduced, 
made  an  attempt  while  in  Germany  to  trace  the  ancestry  of  George 
Philip  Dotterer,  and,  although  he  was  unsuccessful  in  finding  the 
record  of  birth  of  the  American  ancestor,  there  seems  to  be  very  good 
reason  to  believe  that  he  came  from  the  District  of  Wurtemburg 
as  the  church  books  of  Bonningheim,  Buchelberg,  Murrhardt, 
Idestein,  and  Heilbronn,  all  in  Wiirtemburg,  show  a  great  many  of 
the  surname  Doderer,  the  Christian  names,  in  a  number  of  in- 
stances, being  identical  with  those  of  the  American  family.^ 

The  name  Dotterer  is  a  very  unusual  one,  and  very  few  of  the 
early  names  borne  by  the  German  emigrants  coming  to  Pennsyl- 
vania, appear  in  more  varied  form  upon  our  public  records.  It 
is  just  as  often  spelled  with  a  "T"  as  a  ''D",  a  "u"  as  an  "o",  while 
the  final  syllable  is  as  frequently  a  as  er.  In  each  case  we  have 
made  it  a  point  to  preserve  the  form  as  it  appears  in  the  original 
document  quoted. 

A  study  of  the  probable  derivation  of  this  name  may,  to  a  great 
extent,  explain  the  difficulty  English  clerks  seem  to  have  exper- 
ienced in  recording  it.  In  the  Teutonic  name  system  the  root  mean- 
ing affection  or  fondness  is  Dod,  Tod  or  Tot,  Old  German  Dodo  or 
Doddo,  English  Todd  or  Dodd.  When  compounded  with  Hari 
(Warrior)  in  Old  German,  the  Ninth  Century,  it  became  Dothari 
or  with  Ric  (power)  Dothrih.  The  English  forms  are  Dotry, 
Doddridge,  Dottridge." 


1  Henry  S.  Dotterer,  The  Dotterer  Family,  pp.  129,  132. 

2  Robert   Fergueson,    Teutonic  Name  System..     Applied   to   Family   Names   in 
France,  England  and  Germany. 


354  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

The  earliest  record  we  have  concerning  George  Philip 
Dodderer  is  a  deed  dated  December  22, 1722,  for  a  tract  of  one  hun- 
dred acres  of  land  lying  in  what  is  now  Frederick  township,  Mont- 
gomery County,  Pennsylvania,  which  he  purchased  of  Hans  Newes 
or  Nyce.    In  the  deed  his  occupation  is  given  as  that  of  carpenter. 

Deed:  Hans  Newes  et  ux  to  George  Philip  Duddra,  1722 

^f)i0  SntlCntUtC,  Made  the  twenty  second  day  of  December  in  the 
year  of  our  Lord  One  Thousand  seven  hundred  and  twenty  two,  between 
Hans  Newes  of  the  Northern  Liberties  of  the  City  of  Philadelphia  in  the 
Province  of  Pennsylvania,  Yeoman,  and  Yonecan  his  wife  of  the  one 
part.  And  George  Philip  Duddra  of  Falkners  Swamp  in  the  County  of 
Philadelphia  in  the  said  Province,  Carpenter,  of  the  other  part.  Witness- 
eth,  That  the  said  Hans  Newes  and  Yonecan  his  wife  for  and  in  consid- 
eration of  the  sum  of  Twenty  one  pounds  lawful  money  of  America  to 
them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  George  Philip  Duddra  at  and  before  the 
ensealing  and  delivery  hereof  the  receipt  whereof  they  do  hereby  acknowl- 
edge and  thereof  do  acquit  and  forever  discharge  the  said  George  Philip 
Duddra  his  heirs  and  assigns  by  these  presents,  have  granted,  bargained, 
sold,  aliened,  enfeoffed  and  confirmed,  and  by  these  presents  do  grant,  bar- 
gain, sell,  alien,  enfeoff  and  confirm  unto  the  said  George  Philip  Duddra, 
A  Certain  Tract  or  piece  of  land  situate  in  the  same  county.  Beginning  at 
a  post  being  a  corner  of  James  Steel's  land  thence  by  the  same  Southeast 
Eighty  perches  to  a  post,  thence  by  the  land  of  Henry  Grubb  North  east 
Two  hundred  perches  to  a  small  White  Oak  sapling,  thence  by  other  land 
of  the  said  Hans  Newes  North  west  eighty  perches  to  a  post,  thence  by 
the  said  Newes'  land  South  West  Two  hundred  perches  to  the  place  of 
beginning.  Containing  One  hundred  acres.  Together  with  all  and  sin- 
gular the  ways,  woods,  underwoods,  waters,  water-courses,  meadows, 
swamps,  rights,  liberties,  priviledges,  improvements ;  hereditaments  and 
appurtenances  whatsoever  thereunto  belonging  or  in  anywise  appertain- 
ing, and  the  reversion  and  reversions,  remainder  and  remainders,  rents, 
issues  and  profits  thereof.  To  have  and  to  hold  the  said  tract  or  piece  of 
land,  hereditaments  and  premises  hereby  granted  with  the  appurtenances 
unto  the  said  George  Philip  Duddra  his  heirs  and  assigns.  To  the  only 
proper  use  and  behoof  of  the  said  George  Philip  Duddra  his  heirs  and 
assigns  forever  Under  the  yearly  Quit  Rent  hereafter  accrueing  for  the 
same  to  the  Chief  Lord  of  the  Fee  thereof.  And  the  said  Hans  Newes 
and  his  heirs  the  said  Tract  or  piece  of  land,  hereditaments  and  premises 
hereby  granted  or  mentioned  to  be  granted  with  the  appurtenances  unto 


THE  DOTTERER  FAMILY  355 

the  said  George  Philip  Duddra  his  heirs  and  assigns  against  him  the  said 
Hans  Newes  and  Yonecan  his  wife  his  heirs  and  assigns,  and  against  all 
and  every  other  person  and  persons  whatsoever  shall  and  will,  warrant 
and  forever  Defend  by  these  presents.  And  the  said  Hans  Newes  for 
himself  his  heirs,  executors  and  administrators  doth  covenant  promise  and 
grant  to  and  with  the  said  George  Philip  Duddra  his  heirs  and  assigns  by 
these  presents  in  manner  following,  that  is  to  say,  that  he  the  said  Hans 
Newes  at  the  time  of  the  sealing  and  delivery  of  this  present  Indenture  is 
the  true,  sole  and  lawful  owner  and  proprietor  of  the  said  tract  or  piece 
of  land,  hereditaments  and  premises  hereby  granted  or  mentioned  to  be 
granted  with  the  appurtenances,  and  is  lawfully  rightfully  and  absolutely 
seized  thereof  and  every  part  and  parcel  thereof  as  of  a  good  sure,  abso- 
lute and  indefeasible  Estate  of  Inheritance  in  fee  simple,  without  any  con- 
dition, contingent  proviso,  limitation  or  other  restraint  matter  or  thing 
whatsoever  to  alter  defeat  or  determine  the  same.  And  that  he  the  said 
Hans  Newes  will  continue  so  seized  of  the  demises  and  of  every  part 
thereof  until  a  good  sure  perfect  and  indefeasible  Estate  of  Inheritance  in 
fee  simple  shall  be  thereof  vested  in  the  said  George  Philip  Duddra  his 
heirs  and  assigns  according  to  the  purport  and  true  meaning  of  these 
presents.  And  that  free  and  clear  and  freely  and  clearly  acquitted  and 
discharged  of  and  from  all  and  all  manner  of  former  and  other  gifts, 
grants,  bargains,  sales.  Leases,  Mortgages,  Joyntures,  Dowers,  Wills, 
Intails,  Annuities,  Rents,  Arrearages  of  Rent,  Titles,  Charges  and  Incum- 
brances whatsoever  (The  Quit  Rent  aforesaid  and  as  hereafter  accrueing 
only  excepted  and  preferred)  And  that  he  the  said  Hans  Newes  and 
Yonecan  his  wife  and  his  heirs  and  all  and  every  other  person  and  per- 
sons whatsoever  having  or  lawfully  claiming  or  that  shall  or  may  at  any 
time  or  times  hereafter  so  have  or  claim  any  Estate,  Right,  Title  or  Inter- 
est of  in  or  to  the  Premises  or  any  part  or  parcel  thereof  Shall  and  will 
at  any  time  or  times  hereafter  upon  the  reasonable  request  cost  and 
charges  in  law  of  the  said  George  Philip  Duddra  his  heirs  or  assigns  make 
execute  and  acknowledge  or  cause  so  to  be  all  and  every  such  further 
and  other  reasonable  Act  and  Acts,  Deed  or  Deeds,  Devise  or  Devises  in 
law  whatsoever  for  the  further  and  better  assurance  and  confirmation  of 
the  said  Tract  or  piece  o.f  land,  hereditaments  and  premises  hereby  granted 
or  mentioned  to  be  granted  with  the  appurtenances  unto  the  said  George 
Philip  Duddra  his  heirs  and  assigns  as  by  him  or  them  or  by  his  or  their 
council  learned  in  the  Law  shall  be  reasonably  devised,  advised  or  required. 
In  Witness  Whereof,  the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have  inter- 


356  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

changeably  set  their  hands   and  seals,   dated  the  day  and  year  above 
written.^ 

Hans  Nevves 

Sealed  and  Delivered  in  the  her 

presence  of  us.     By  the  said  Yonecan    X    Newes 

Cha.  Osborne  mark 

Jos.  Watson. 

On  February  3,  1725,  he  acquired  another  tract  of  fifty  acres 
from  the  same. 

Ci)i0  3n Denture,  Made  the  third  day  of  February  in  the  year  of 
our  Lord  One  thousand  seven  hundred  and  twenty  five.  Between  Hans 
Newes  of  the  Northern  Liberties  of  the  City  of  Philadelphia  in  the  Prov- 
ince of  Pennsylvania,  Yeoman,  and  Yonecan  his  wife  of  the  one  part,  And 
George  Philip  Duddra  of  Falkner's  Swamp  in  the  County  of  Philadel- 
phia in  the  said  Province,  Carpenter  of  the  other  part.  Witnesseth,  that 
the  said  Hans  Newes  and  Yonecan  his  wife  for  and  in  consideration  of 
the  sum  of  Sixteen  pounds,  thirteen  shillings  and  four  pence,  lawful 
money  of  Pennsylvania  to  them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said  George  Philip 
Duddra,  at  or  before  the  sealing  or  delivering  hereof,  the  receipt  whereof 
they  do  hereby  acknowledge  and  thereof  do  acquit  and  forever  discharge, 
the  said  George  Philip  Duddra  his  heirs  and  assigns  by  these  presents 
Have  granted,  bargained,  sold,  aliened,  enfeoffed,  released  and  confirmed, 
and  by  these  presents  do  grant,  bargain,  sell,  alien,  enfeoff,  release  and 
confirm  unto  the  said  George  Philip  Duddra  (in  his  actual  possession  and 
seizen  now  being  by  force  and  virtue  of  a  bargain  and  sale  unto  him  made 
by  the  said  Hans  Newes  and  Yonecan  his  wife  for  the  term  of  one  year 
from  the  day  next  before  the  day  of  the  date  thereof  by  Indenture  bearing 
date  the  day  next  before  the  day  of  the  date  hereof  made  between  the  same 
parties  as  these  presents,  and  by  force  and  virtue  of  the  statutes  made  for 
transferring  of  uses  into  possession)  and  to  his  heirs  and  assigns. 

A  certain  tract  or  parcel  of  land  situated  in  the  said  county  of  Phila- 
delphia. Beginning  at  a  white  oak  marked  for  a  corner,  thence  north- 
west by  vacant  land  ninety  eight  perches  to  a  post  by  a  corner  of  Michael 
Duddra's  land  thence  by  the  same  and  John  Newes  land  southwest  Two 
hundred  and  forty  six  perches  to  a  post  by  a  corner  of  John  Newe's  land 
thence  by  the  same  land  South  east  eighteen  perches  to  a  post  at  a  corner 


1  Deed  Book  F  No.  3,  p.  329.     Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


THE  DOTTERER  FAMILY  357 

of  other  land  of  said  George  Philip  Duddra,  thence  by  the  same  north  east 
two  hundred  perches  to  another  corner  of  his  other  land,  thence  by  the 
same  South  east  Eighty  perches,  thence  by  vacant  land  north  east  forty 
six  perches  to  the  place  of  beginning.  Containing  fifty  acres.  *  *  * 
In  Witness  Whereof,  the  said  parties  to  these  presents  have  inter- 
changeably set  their  hands  and  seals  hereunto.  Dated  the  day  and  year 
first  above  written.^ 

Hans  Newes 
her 

YoNECAN    X    Newes 
mark 

George  Philip  Dodderer  then  applied  to  the  Proprietaries  of 
the  Commonwealth  for  a  survey  and  confirmation  of  these  two 
tracts.  Accordingly  on  March  24,  1736,  he  was  granted  a  patent 
for  the  same.  This  patent,  as  on  record  in  the  Land  Office  at  Har- 
risburg,  reads: 

Patent  to  George  Philip  Totherah  Al^  Duddera,  1736 

JOHN  PENN,  THOMAS  PENN  and  RICHARD  PENN,  Esquires, 
true  and  absolute  Proprietaries  and  Governors  in  Chief  of  the  Province 
of  Pennsylvania  and  the  Counties  of  Newcastle,  Kent  and  Sussex,  on 
Delaware. 

To  all  unto  whom  these  Presents  shall  come,  Greeting : 
CO|)0t0^0,  in  and  by  Deeds  indented  of  Lease  and  Release  bearing 
Date  respectively  the  eleventh  and  twelfth  days  of  October  in  the  year  of 
our  Lord  1681  for  the  consideration  therein  mentioned  our  late  Father 
William  Penn  Esq*"  then  Proprietary  and  Governor  in  Chief  of  our  said 
Province  did  grant  and  release  unto  William  Bacon  of  the  Midle  Temple 
Gen*  the  quantity  of  five  thousand  acres  of  Land  to  be  surveyed  within  our 
said  Province  To  Hold  to  him  his  Heirs  and  Assigns  forever  Under  the 
yearly  Quitrent  of  one  shilling  (sterling)  for  every  hundred  acres  of  the 
same  And  WHEREAS  in  and  by  other  Deeds  of  Lease  and  Release  bear- 
ing date  the  nineteenth  and  twentieth  days  of  February  Anno  1718  For  the 
consideration  therein  mentioned  he  the  said  William  Bacon  did  grant 
and  release  the  same  quantity  of  Five  thousand  acres  of  Land  and  prem- 
ises with  the  appurtenances  unto  Humphry  Murry  and  John  Budd  then 


1  Deed  Book  F  No.  3,  p.  330.     Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 


358  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

of  the  City  of  Philadelphia  To  Hold  to  them  their  heirs  and  assigns  for 
ever,  And  to  the  end  and  purpoe  that  the  same  quantity  of  Land  might  be 
accordingly  surveyed  two  several  Warrants  at  the  instance  and  request 
of  the  said  Humphry  Murry  and  John  Budd  were  granted  by  the  late 
Commissioners  of  Property  under  our  lesser  seal  bearing  date  respec- 
tively the  fifth  day  of  the  third  month  and  the  twenty  eighth  day  of  the 
sixth  month  Anno  1719  And  the  said  Humphry  Murry  and  John  Budd 
haveing  by  like  Deeds  of  Lease  and  Release  of  the  twenty-fifth  and  twenty- 
sixth  days  of  October  Anno  1720  granted  unto  Hans  Newes  then  of  the 
Northern  Liberties  of  Phil^  since  deceased  the  quantity  of  seven  hundred 
twenty-five  acres  part  of  the  said  five  thousand  acres  of  Land  the  same 
was  surveyed  and  laid  out  unto  the  said  Hans  Newes  in  two  several  tracts 
one  of  five  hundred  the  other  two  hundred  twenty  five  acres  on  the  second 
and  third  days  of  November  then  next  ensuing  lying  near  the  Branches  of 
Parkeawming  Creek  in  the  County  of  Philadelphia  as  in  and  by  the  sur- 
veys thereof  remaining  in  our  Surveyor  Generals  Office  may  appear  And 
WHEREAS  in  and  by  two  certain  Deeds  the  one  bearing  date  the  twenty 
second  day  o.f  December  1722  and  the  other  the  fourth  day  of  February 
1725  he  the  said  Hans  Newes  and  lonecan  aP  Yonecan  his  wife  For  the 
consideration  therein  respectively  mentioned  did  grant  and  convey  unto 
George  Philip  Totherah  aP  Duddera  his  heirs  and  assigns  the  quantity  of 
one  hundred  and  fifty  acres  of  the  tract  of  Five  Hundred  acres  surveyed 
as  aforesaid  being  since  circumscribed  within  the  bounds  of  Fredericks 
Township  Beginning  at  a  White  Oak  in  a  line  of  the  said  George  Philip 
Totherah's  other  land  thence  by  land  now  or  late  of  Henry  Grubb  south 
west  two  hundred  forty  six  perches  to  a  corner  of  the  land  late  of  James 
Steel  then  north  west  ninety  eight  perches  part  thereof  by  the  land  last 
mentioned  and  part  by  land  of  John  Newes  thence  by  the  said  John  Newes 
Land  and  land  of  Michael  Totherah  North  East  two  hundred  forty  six 
perches  to  a  line  of  the  said  George  Philip  Totherah's  other  land  thence  by 
the  same  South  East  ninety  eight  perches  to  the  place  of  beginning  Con- 
taining one  hundred  and  fifty  acres  as  in  and  by  the  survey  and  division 
of  the  same  remaining  in  our  Surveyor  General's  Office  and  from  thence 
certified  into  our  Secretary's  Ofiice  may  appear. 

Now  at  the  instance  and  request  of  the  said  George  Philip  Totherah 
that  we  would  be  pleased  to  grant  him  a  confirmation  of  the  said  one  hun- 
dred and  fifty  acres  of  Land  according  to  the  situation  and  survey  afores'^, 
Know  Ye,  That  in  consideration  of  the  several  grants  matters  and  things 
herein  before  recited,  and  for  the  Yearly  Quit-Rent  hereinafter  mentioned 
and  reserved,  We  have  given,  granted,  released  and  confirmed,  and  by 
these  presents,  for  us,  our  heirs  and  successors,  Do  give,  grant,  release  and 


THE  DOTTERER  FAMILY  359 

confirm  unto  the  said  George  Philip  Totherah  and  his  heirs  the  said  one 
hundred  and  fifty  acres  of  land,  as  the  same  is  now  set  forth,  bounded  and 
limited   as   aforesaid;    with   all    Mines,    Minerals,   Quarries,    Meadows, 
Marshes,   Savannahs,  Swamps,  Cripples,  Woods,  Underwoods,  Timber 
and  Trees,  Ways,  Waters,  Water-courses,  Liberties,  Profits,  Commodities, 
Advantages,  Hereditaments,  and  Appurtenances  whatsoever  to  the  said 
one  hundred  and  fifty  acres  of  land  belonging  or  in  any  wise  appertaining 
and  lying  within  the  bounds  and  limits  aforesaid,  (all  Royal  mines  only 
excepted  and  hereby  reserved,)  and  also  free  leave,  right  and  liberty  to 
and  for  the  said  George  Philip  Totherah  his  heirs  and  assigns,  to  hawk, 
hunt,  fish  and  fowl,  in  and  upon  the  hereby  granted  land  and  premises  or 
upon  any  part  thereof :  To  Have  and  to  Hold  the  said  one  hundred  and 
fifty  acres  of  land  and  premises  hereby  granted,  (except  before  excepted,) 
with  their  appurtenances  unto  the  said  George  Philip  Totherah  his  heirs 
and  assigns.  To  the  only  use  and  behoof  of  the  said  George  Philip  Toth- 
erah his  heirs  and  assigns  forever :  To  be  holden  of  us,  our  heirs  and  suc- 
cessors, Proprietaries  of  Pennsylvania,  as  of  our  Manor  of  Springsbury 
in  the  County  of  Philadelphia  aforesaid,  in  free  and  common  socage  by 
fealty  only,  in  lieu  of  all  other  services,  Yielding  and  Paying  therefor 
yearly  unto  us,  our  heirs  and  successors,  at  the  City  of  Philadelphia,  at  or 
upon  the  first  day  of  March  in  every  year,  from  the  first  day  o.f  this  instant 
March,  one  English  silver  shilling  for  the  one  hundred  acres,  and  in  pro- 
portion for  the  fifty  acres,  or  value  thereof  in  coin-current,  according  as 
the  exchange  shall  then  be  between  our  said  province  and  the  city  of 
London,  to  such  person  or  persons  as  shall,  from  time  to  time,  be  appointed 
to  receive  the  same.     And  in  case  of  non-payment  therein  within  ninety 
days  next  after  the  same  shall  become  due,  that  then  it  shall  and  may  be 
lawful  for  us,  our  heirs  and  successors,  our  and  their  receiver  or  receiv- 
ers, into  and  upon  the  hereby  granted  land  and  premises  to  re-enter,  and 
the  same  to  hold  and  possess  until  the  Quit-rent,  and  all  the  arrears 
thereof,  together  with  the  charges  accruing  by  means  of  such  non-pay- 
ment and  re-entry  aforesaid,  be  .fully  paid  and  discharged. 

IN  WITNESS  WHEREOF,  the  said  Thomas  Penn  by  virtue  of  the 
powers  and  authorities  to  him  granted  by  the  said  John  and  Richard  Penn 
and  of  his  own  right  caused  the  Great  Seal  of  the  said  province  to  be 
hereunto  affixed  at  Philadelphia,  this  twenty  first  day  of  March  Anno  D" 
1736  the  tenth  year  of  the  reign  of  King  George  the  Second  over  Great 
Britain,  &c.,  and  the  nineteenth  year  of  our  Government.^ 

Tho.  Penn     (L.  S.) 


1  Patent  Book  A,  Vol.  8,  p.  201.     Harrlsburg,  Pennsylvania. 


360  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

In  pursuance  of  another  warrant  from  the  Proprietaries  dated 
May  29,  1734,  he  was  enabled  to  add  still  another  one  hundred 
acres  to  his  possessions.  This  third  tract  was  surveyed  and  finally 
confirmed  to  him  by  patent  March  24,  1738. 

Patent  to  George  Philip  Totherah,  1738 

JOHN  PENN,  THOMAS  PENN  and  RICHARD  PENN, 
Esquires,  true  and  absolute  Proprietaries  and  Governors  in  Chief  of  the 
Province  of  Pennsylvania  and  Counties  of  Newcastle,  Kent  and  Sussex, 
on  Delaware.     To  all  unto  whom  these  Presents  shall  come.  Greeting: 

WHEREAS,  in  pursuance  and  by  virtue  of  a  warrant  under  our 
lesser  seal  being  date  the  twenty-ninth  day  of  May  in  the  year  of  our  Lord 
1734  there  was  surveyed  on  the  sixth  day  of  November  then  next  following 
unto  George  Philip  Totherah  of  the  County  of  Philadelphia  a  certain  tract 
of  land  situate  in  Frederick  Township  in  the  said  County  Beginning  at  a 
White  Oak  at  a  Corner  of  the  said  George  Philip  Totherah's  other  land 
and  extending  thence  by  the  same  and  by  Land  of  Michael  Totherah 
North  West  one  hundred  eighty  nine  perches  to  a  post  thence  by  vacant 
land  North  East  ninety  perches  to  a  post  and  South  East  one  hundred 
eighty  nine  perches  to  a  post  in  a  line  of  George  Trumbauers  land  thence 
by  the  same  and  by  vacant  land  South  West  ninety  perches  to  the  place 
of  beginning  containing  one  hundred  acres  and  the  allowance  of  six  acres 
for  Roads  and  Highways  as  in  and  by  the  survey  thereof  remaining  in  our 
Surveyor  General's  Office  and  from  them  certified  into  our  Secretaries 
Office  may  appear.       *      *      *      ************ 

Now  at  the  instance  and  request  of  the  said  George  Philip  Totherah 
that  we  would  be  pleased  to  grant  him  a  confirmation  of  the  same :  Know 
Ye,  That  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  fifteen  pounds  ten  shillings  law- 
ful money  of  Pennsylvania,  to  our  use,  paid  by  the  said  George  Philip 
Totherah  the  receipt  whereof  we  hereby  acknowledge  and  thereof  do 
acquit  and  forever  discharge  the  said  George  Philip  Totherah  his  heirs 
and  assigns,  by  these  presents,  and  also  of  the  Yearly  Quit-rent  herein- 
after mentioned  and  reserved,  We  have  given,  granted,  released  and  con- 
firmed, and  by  these  presents,  for  us,  our  heirs  and  successors,  Do  give, 
grant,  release  and  confirm  unto  the  said  George  Philip  Totherah  his  heirs, 
the  said  one  hundred  acres  of  land,  as  the  same  is  now  set  forth,  bounded 
and  limited  as  aforesaid. 

IN  WITNESS  WHEREOF,  the  said  Thomas  Penn  by  virtue  of  the 
powers  and  authorities  to  him  granted  by  the  said  John  and  Richard  Penn 
and  of  his  own  right  hath  caused  the  Great  Seal  of  the  said  province  to  be 
hereunto  affixed  at  Philadelphia,  this  twenty  fourth  day  of  March  in  the 


THE  DOTTERER  FAMILY  361 

year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  thirty  eight  the  twelfth 
year  of  the  reign  of  King  George  the  Second,  over  Great  Britain,  &c.,  and 
the  twenty-first  year  of  our  Government.^ 

Tho.  Penn    (L.  S.) 


By  virtue  of  a  Warrant  from  the  Proprietaries  dated  the  twenty 
ninth  day  of  May  1734  Surveyed  unto  George  PhilHp  Totherah  a  Tract  of 
Land  situate  in  Frederick  Township  in  the  County  of  Philad^  Begining 
at  a  large  white  oak  a  corner  of  his  other  Land  thence  by  the  same  and 
Land  of  Michael  Totherah  North  west  one  hundred  eighty  nine  perches  to 
a  post  thence  by  Vacant  Land  north  east  ninety  perches  to  post  thence  by 
vacant  land  South  east  one  hundred  eighty  nine  perches  to  a  post  in  a  line 
of  George  Trumbaurs  land  thence  by  the  same  and  vacant  land  South  west 
ninety  perches  to  a  place  of  Begining  Containing  one  hundred  acres  with 
the  usual  allowance  of  Six  p  Cent.  Surveyed  9  br.  6  1734.^ 
By  NicHo,  Scull. 

1  Patent  Book  A,  Vol.  9,  p.  47.     Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania. 

2  Survey  Book  A-73,  p.  275.     Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania. 


362  THE  STRASSBURGER  GENEALOGY 

These  three  purchases  were  adjoining  tracts,  forming  a  planta- 
tion of  two  hundred  and  fifty  acres  located  on  the  east  and  west 
side  of  Society  Run,  in  the  present  Frederick  Township,  Mont- 
gomery County.  Up  to  1731,  the  territory  comprising  Frederick 
Township  was  known  as  Falkner's  Swamp,  a  name  given  the  ex- 
tensive region  drained  by  Swamp  Creek  and  tributaries  within  the 
old  limits  of  Philadelphia  County.  These  early  conveyances  show  a 
wide  variation  in  the  spelling  of  the  name  Dodderer.  In  the  first 
mentioned  deeds,  he  is  described  as  "George  Philip  Duddra  of  Falk- 
ner  Swamp,  Philadelphia  County,  carpenter,"  while  in  the  patents 
as  "George  Philip  Totherah."  In  1728  his  name  appears  on  the 
records  of  the  Reformed  Church  as  George  Philip  Totterer. 

Hans  Newes  (de  Nyce,  Nice)  was  a  large  landowner  who 
resided  in  the  Northern  Liberties,  Philadelphia,  and  never  occu- 
pied his  lands  in  Montgomery  County.  Tradition  claims  that 
George  Philip  Dodderer  was  the  first  settler  on  the  banks  of  Society 
Run,  and  that  the  Indians  were  the  only  neighbors  of  himself  and 
family  at  the  beginning. 

Following  are  reminiscences  handed  down  from  father  to  son 
for  more  than  a  century  and  a  half,  as  received  from  the  late 
Michael  D